/ Warm waterproof gloves.

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Fredt 05 Dec 2019

Looking for warm and waterproof gloves for my Christmas present, mainly for hiking, I already have some big mountaineering gloves, but these are too bulky to stuff in my pockets for a walk.

I looked at Sealskinz, but they seem to get mixed reviews.

What do the good and great of UKC and H recommend?

(touch screen capability would be useful)

Ta.

bouldery bits 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

I like my sealskins. 

They keep the water and wind off pretty well. No such thing as a genuinely waterproof Glove  inmy book - unless you want marigolds! 

Billhook 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt

:http://www.moandco.com/workwear/gloves/skytec-argon-thermal-gloves.html

Cheap, warm, waterproof and excellent grip.  The only problem is if you do end up with damp hands due to sweating they may take a while to dry out.  Most larger builder's  merchants stock them in various makes.  

1
bouldery bits 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

Oh, and they have touchscreen too.

These ones: https://www.sealskinz.com/gloves/stretch-fleece-nano-gloves-black.htm 

For anything proper cold, it's always pile mitts for me

Fredt 05 Dec 2019
In reply to bouldery bits:

> I like my sealskins. 

> They keep the water and wind off pretty well. No such thing as a genuinely waterproof Glove  inmy book - unless you want marigolds! 

Which model do you have?

DaveHK 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Billhook:

> Cheap, warm, waterproof and excellent grip.  

I love my argons for hard mixed climbing. They're cheap, warm enough and dextrous like you say but not even remotely waterproof. The fingers and palms are but there is a knitted section on the back that lets water in very quickly.

featuresforfeet 05 Dec 2019
In reply to DaveHK:

Similarly, tried these a few times and they’re not bad, pretty waterproof. Take forever to dry if the do get wet though. 

https://www.screwfix.com/p/uci-aquatek-thermo-full-dip-latex-thermal-gloves-orange-large/182gx

OwenM 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

I've just got some Rab Vapour-rise gloves, I'm really impressed with them. Not thick but very windproof with a micro-fleece lining. They also have leather palms, I wanted this as I do cross-country skiing, which eats gloves.

Deadeye 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

OK.  I'm going to predict the future here.

This will happen:

I'm going to say go and get a pair of Skyteck Argon gloves.

You're going to be skeptical - but your curiousity will pique you to google.

You'll see that they're about 10% of the price of usual mountaineering gloves.

You'll be more skeptical.

Then you'll think, "for a fiver, what's really to lose?"

Then you'll order some, try them, and thank me later.

I received a similarly worded challenge over a decade ago and have skiied, mountaineered, cleared gutters and walked in winter to my hearts content with them since.

DaveHK 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Deadeye:

> OK.  I'm going to predict the future here.

> This will happen:

I like them but I think you're overconfident in them. I know plenty of people who've tried them and not got on with them and I only like them in certain situations.

Deadeye 05 Dec 2019
In reply to DaveHK:

> I know plenty of people who've tried them and not got on with them and I only like them in certain situations.

Why?  They're warm, durable, light, waterproof, stay-waterproof-under-duress, cheap, allow quite fine control (I can easily tie laces/do crampons).  I carry two pairs - one to wear and one sealed in a bag to break out dry if I need it.

Genuinely interested why folk don't get on with them.  I'd prefer a mitt though...

DaveHK 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Deadeye:

> Genuinely interested why folk don't get on with them.  I'd prefer a mitt though...

In wet conditions your hands get soaked very quickly due to the knitted backs, the water can't escape due to the waterproof fingers/palm and even wringing them out doesn't really work. Wet hands are cold hands.

If you have very sweaty hands they get pretty wet pretty quickly as fingers and palm are not breathable.

The cuff is not very long so if climbing you get a gap between jacket and glove.

For a pitch or 2 of hard climbing I've never found anything better but for most other applications (winter walking/running, skiing, easier climbing, longer climbs) I find other things do the job better.

Post edited at 21:25
ElArt 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

Sure I’ve seen another thread that said it’s best to have more than one pair of gloves. That way your gloves don’t have to be the best, they just have to be easy to dry somewhere  - like under your armpits!!

Caveat: I’m not a winter climber!

Deadeye 05 Dec 2019
In reply to DaveHK:

> In wet conditions your hands get soaked very quickly due to the knitted backs, the water can't escape due to the waterproof fingers/palm and even wringing them out doesn't really work. Wet hands are cold hands.

So you mean they let water in but not out?  There should be an application for that!  I've not found them to leak but a mate washes them in caggie-proofer.

> If you have very sweaty hands they get pretty wet pretty quickly as fingers and palm are not breathable.

I thought I had pretty sweaty hands, but obviously not.  You'd need sewriously sweaty hands for this to be a problem.

> The cuff is not very long so if climbing you get a gap between jacket and glove.

The cuff comes up to cover the antebrachial faschia on me; my caggie comes to almost the first joint of my thumb, so ?8cm overlap?

> For a pitch or 2 of hard climbing I've never found anything better but for most other applications (winter walking/running, skiing, easier climbing, longer climbs) I find other things do the job better.

I think the disadvatages of ordinary gloves need weighing too: seams (shocking idea), fragaile membranes, and very pricey.

2
Myfyr Tomos 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

 I suffer from seriously cold hands and find warm and dry gloves to be an elusive item. In winter I use Buffalo mitts - warm and damp and reasonably dextrous, without the bulk. And for super cold, another pair of XXL Buffalo mitts over the top. Works for me.

PFitz 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Myfyr Tomos:

Agree 100% about Buffalo gloves

Often carry a spare pair in bad conditions and have handed them out so often to help friends whose gloves have failed them - getting them to hand them back is sometimes a challenge 

A pair lives in the running pack all winter - snow, rain, sweat - no problem they just work

Even use them On the smallholding in the snow for sheep feeding duties - perhaps the very definition of cold and wet - just brilliant mitts

DaveHK 06 Dec 2019
In reply to Deadeye:

Obviously you use them differently to me and find them to be fine. I find them to be good for some things but to have really serious limitations. That's the problem with outdoor kit recommendations, people use it in different ways so have different experiences.

Just because they work for you doesn't mean they'll work for everyone and however hard you try you're not going to convince me I didn't actually have cold, wet hands in them or gaps at the cuffs!

Post edited at 04:52
DanielJ 06 Dec 2019
In reply to DaveHK:

Ive got similar experience, wet and cold that is. I gave my Argons away. Now climbing mostly with Camp and BD gloves who’s warmer, drier and better fitting for my hands.

And yeah, they’re well expensive, so that’s the downside.

DaveHK 06 Dec 2019
In reply to DanielJ:

> Ive got similar experience, wet and cold that is.

I now take a pair for the crux of a hard route (not below VII mostly) but use other gloves for the vast majority of my climbing. I found that they were pretty damp and therefore cold after a single hard pitch. Unless it's really damp I find I can usually get a whole day out of my Simond leather gloves without changing them and they're only £20.

Although the op was asking about walking so a lot of that won't be relevant.

Post edited at 07:35
Toccata 06 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

OX Thermal Latex. Amazing kit for £4. Warm, extraordinarily puncture resistant and perfect for winter climbing. Reversible inner meaning they can be dried out on a radiator.

https://www.buildingsuppliesdirect.com/ox-group-ox-waterproof-thermal-latex-glove-size-9-large-ox-s483909?gclid=CjwKCAiA8qLvBRAbEiwAE_ZzPV6z19G9lL2rgRMbMnRLUYBRjLIKhdhiDz1MW6eU5WJRUbBH-7NGvRoCwhwQAvD_BwE

nufkin 06 Dec 2019
In reply to bouldery bits:

>  pile mitts for me

Is that just a euphemism for warming your hands in your arse crack?

oldie 06 Dec 2019
In reply to Myfyr Tomos:

>In winter I use Buffalo mitts - warm and damp and reasonably dextrous, without the bulk. <

Another agreement for this type of mitt (pile+permeable shell). Good for hiking as OP requires, not so good for climbing. I find the (pre-Buffalo) Helly Hansen Polar mitts a bit warmer (more windproof?) and they are still available if you search on internet.

olddirtydoggy 06 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

Keeping in mind your question is posed as a hiker I'd also side with mitts. I use a Montane showerproof pair and if I need to use the phone they slide off much easier than gloves so isn't a big deal to take them off briefly. Very light and compress well.

olddirtydoggy 06 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

Just got a mailshot from PH Designs. They are selling off a mitt with fingers that flap open to access a phone for £29. Not something I would personally need to own but seems to fit your request.

Climbing Pieman 07 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

Re SealSkinz gloves, I’ve got a three different models and whilst you can’t doubt the waterproofing of them whilst they last, I have never found any of them warm enough for what the company claim and certainly not for the colder hill walking days out. 
The “warmest” of SealSkinzs I have is the Extreme Cold Weather gloves, admittedly now a few years old version, but I get cold fingers in them even at zero C or just below within a couple of hours. I’ve tried even with another glove inside and still get cold fingers.

Best gloves I’ve used in the hills for really cold conditions are both Montane models that have primaloft and pile inners. Warm even when they get damp, one is actually waterproof, but you always get some wetting out when taking on and off, etc. Old models now but suggest you check out Montane’s latest equivalents as they seem to have primaloft gold now.

MrToffee 10 Dec 2019

sealskinz snow leopard gloves i use. Wind/waterproof hands stay warm enough 

Mac fae Stirling 10 Dec 2019
In reply to Deadeye:

> OK.  I'm going to predict the future here.

> This will happen:

> I'm going to say go and get a pair of Skyteck Argon gloves.

> You're going to be skeptical - but your curiousity will pique you to google.

> You'll see that they're about 10% of the price of usual mountaineering gloves.

> You'll be more skeptical.

> Then you'll think, "for a fiver, what's really to lose?"

> Then you'll order some, try them, and thank me later.

> I received a similarly worded challenge over a decade ago and have skiied, mountaineered, cleared gutters and walked in winter to my hearts content with them since.

Interesting. I tried these once in winter. Hands got soaked and cold really quickly. Thought they were hopeless. Glad you have had a positive time with them though. 

ebdon 10 Dec 2019
In reply to Fredt:

Another vote for buffalo mitts, sure they get wet but they stay warm, dry super quick and there comparatively cheap. I use mine all the time in winter, even for cycling! They  are crap for actually climbing in though.

oldie 10 Dec 2019
In reply to Mac fae Stirling:

I find Argons fine if its not too cold and conditions aren't such that water gets through the porous non-windproof glove back. They are quite dextrous but don't have a long warm cuff. I've started taking at least two pairs so I can change to a dry pair if necessary (as recommended in other threads). A pair of the light featherweight Buffalo mitts or similar provide good backup.

Upthread similar gloves but with a waterproof back were recommended which presumably decrease water ingress and vulnerability to wind, albeit at the expense of more sweating.

Over the years I've seen many expensive winter gloves sliding past after being dropped by other parties and experience a degree of smug satisfaction that I'm using cheapos.

George Ormerod 10 Dec 2019
In reply to Mac fae Stirling:

I agree, I've tried numerous Argon type gloves and they were all shite.  The Argons felt like they were sucking the heat out of my hands, so now I use a range of stuff, but the OR Bitterblaze gloves are good - warm and waterproof.  You should caveat all this with the fact that I get very cold hands.

climber34neil 10 Dec 2019

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