/ How cold for LS Nepal Extreme's?

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edunn 06 Nov 2019

I have a pair of the classic La Sportiva Nepal Extremes which I used to use for summer alpine stuff.

I've been doing much more winter Ski-Mo stuff recently so have been clattering my way up climbs and scrambles with the Dynafit TLT6's, which are plastic with a nice insulated booty.

I know the Dynafit's are much warmer than the Nepals, but there's a likelihood I'll need to use the Nepals for some winter alpine stuff in Kyrgyzstan (lots of ridge scrambling).

I haven't worn the Nepals for ages so can't remember how comfortable they're likely to be in some potentially quite cold conditions. What do people think? Will the Nepals be OK for winter alpine stuff (c 4,000m) with temperatures around -20 at night (highly likely to be out after dark some days).

Thoughts welcome 

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pass and peak 06 Nov 2019
In reply to edunn:

Used my Nepal evo's (basically an extreme) Beginning of April time in 2017 on a couple of 3800m routes in Alps. Would say they were OK when moving, but when stuck on a belay for an excessive time they were struggling, had to stamp feet, do the disco shuffle, swear a lot under my breath at my partner etc! Think If I were to repeat those climbs I'd prefer something warmer, as I rather cherish my toes.

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dunnyg 06 Nov 2019
In reply to edunn:

I would buy some warmer ones. I always think how much are your toes worth to you? I was glad to have warmer boots in Kyrgyzstan in the summer (Baturas I think). Getting frostbite in kyrgyz is more likely to have higher consequences due to the distance to, and quality of medical facilities in the country, than the same in the Alps, where you are a chopper ride away from quality healthcare. etc..

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Tim Davies 06 Nov 2019
In reply to dunnyg:

Another vote for Warmer boots. Friend used them in the alps one January and still suffers now from where he got frost nipped toes. 

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Tom Ripley 06 Nov 2019
In reply to edunn:

I’d get some warmer double boots if I were you. 

Its worth having boots with removable inners as you can dry them out, over night, in your sleeping bag. Plus they stay warm so you don’t start the day with cold feet.

I’d also consider wearing vapour barrier socks if I were you. 

Double boots might seem expensive,  but they’ll be a lot cheaper than frostbite, and you can sell them on after your trip.

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Misha 06 Nov 2019
In reply to edunn:

Being out in -20 at night sounds like double boots territory. Haven’t used the Nepals for years but wouldn’t fancy anything alpine in them outside the summer. 

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Damo 07 Nov 2019
In reply to edunn:

> ... for some winter alpine stuff in Kyrgyzstan (lots of ridge scrambling).

A few years back it got down to -50c in Bishkek. Dog only knows what it would have been at 4000m.

Doubles, not Nepals, no question.

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TobyA 07 Nov 2019
In reply to edunn:

I've used Nepals in temperatures down to about -20, but for single pitch ice climbing with mainly short walk-ins, and where you go back to your car at the end of the day and drive home. I've used them with super gaiters on them at maybe around -15 for much longer days in the Norwegian arctic multipitch ice climbing, but if you need to camp out (which I have done a few times) you can expect either to sleep with your boots or have very cold and probably rather frozen boots to put on in the morning. Warming them over a stove sort of works, but is a hassle.

I got a pair of Sportiva Baruntse which are brilliant - they are basically a double boot version of the Nepals. Still listed on LA's North America site but not on the global site - which is odd.

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edunn 07 Nov 2019
In reply to edunn:

Thanks all. Doubles it is!

Cheers.

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