UKH

NEWSFLASH: Doug Scott dies aged 79

New Topic
This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
 UKC/UKH News 07 Dec 2020

Mountaineering and climbing legend Doug Scott has died at the age of 79 after a battle with cancer.

Read more

Doug Scott, passed away peacefully at home early hours of this morning.

An amazing man and a brilliant mountaineer, RIP.


Gone for good 07 Dec 2020
In reply to andyb211:

This is very sad news. RIP Doug, your spirit and outstanding climbing achievements will live on in the mountains and in the mountain communities around the world. 

 GrahamD 07 Dec 2020
In reply to andyb211:

One of my early climbing heroes.  Sad news.

 Lankyman 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

A legendary climber where the word 'legendary' is most appropriate. I saw some of his lectures as a kid and a young man and read all about his expeditions. Inspired me to go and have a look at the Himalayas, even if it was just to walk and look up in awe. His Big Wall book was my main source of information about how to actually use basic climbing gear.

Post edited at 13:38
 Eagle warrior 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

The Just Giving page is still up for the Community Action Nepal Everest Challenge 2020

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/caneverest2020

 Rob Exile Ward 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Yeah, a real moment for reflection. I never met him, but I followed his career since I first started - his account of the first Brit ascent of Salathe Wall - On The Profundity Trail - was inspirational, a masterpiece of self deprecation, understatement and imagination.  In fact, I was misled by it, and maybe had less respect for his solid and powerful climbing ability than I should have ... attempts at the Big Overhang and contemplating his early Alpine achievements gradually set me straight.

Seems to me he was a bloke who organised his life very well, and made the most of every opportunity that then came his way. All the more credit for that; and the sheer unremitting understated boldness that he showed on so many ascents, whether an early ascent of the Bonatti Pillar, first ascent of the horrific Big Overhang, and of course all his later climbs in the Greater ranges. A real hero of the climbing community.

 NickK123 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

We had our differences, but without question you were an outstanding mountaineer Doug.  My positive thoughts go to your family at this difficult time.  RIP

 Sean Kelly 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Scott was also a very able photographer. His photo of Haston on the summit of Everest hasn't been improved upon. An iconic image of a past era that ushered in the bold Alpine style approach to the major ranges for which he was very much a moving force. Of course he was the first Englishman to tick both Everest & K2. It's been bad year in so many ways.

Post edited at 14:32
 emily roo 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

"Have this signed poster of Angel Peak for being such an angel" - after 22 year old me had helped arrange a logistically complicated lecture for Doug... His photos and stories definitely played a large part in my desire to climb high snowy peaks. Very sad news.

 Carless 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Sad news - another legend

 jezmartin 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Very sad at the passing of such a brilliant mountaineer .. he was a great rugby player to at Notts Moderns, he played second / back row and I had the pleasure in playing against him on a number of occasions. As you might imagine he was robust and as strong as an ox. RIP Doug

 Pekkie 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Do not crawl gentle into that good night...

 Pekkie 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Actually, Doug Scott's main claim to fame is not crawling down the Ogre and all that stuff but rescuing Gary Smith at Pex Hill after a fall. Gary was lying moaning with a broken leg, skull, etc, etc when two elderly climbers ran up, made him comfortable and called the ambulance. Doug Scott and Ken Wilson. After recovering, Gary invited them to a party at his house. His mother was carrying a tray of tea and scones, but tripped depositing the trayful into Doug Scott's lap. 'Aye,' the Ogre crawler remarked drily. 'I see it runs in the family.'

 Harry Jarvis 07 Dec 2020
In reply to Sean Kelly:

> Of course he was the first Englishman to tick both Everest & K2. 

Are you sure you're right about that? 

Notwithstanding, he was a hugely important figure in world mountaineering, and it was greatly to his credit that he put so much effort into his charitable activities. He was made of stern stuff. 

In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Sad news. For those of us of a certain generation he was an absolute giant, not only for the SW face of Everset but more especially for the Ogre `crawl'. 


 Sean Kelly 07 Dec 2020
In reply to Harry Jarvis:

I got that from the bbc site which appears to be wrong. 8000metre site has all the ascentionists of Everest & K2 and Scott is not listed. Did he not climb Kachengunga which is where the beeb got it mixed up.

Post edited at 16:51
 John2 07 Dec 2020
In reply to Sean Kelly:

He did climb Kangchenjunga, but of course was not the first Englishman to reach the summit.

 jcw 07 Dec 2020
In reply to andyb211:

Doug was always friendly with no side to him. Unlike another leading British climber who clearly decided I would be of no use to him when I was introduced, Doug always came and talked to me whether in the Nash or in more formal gatherings. He took people for what they were and his leadership reflected that approach, as I am sure others will testify. He had flaws, but these in some measure helped endear him to many;  his friends will  remember him with affection as well as celebrate him for the great climber and mountaineer he was.  

 Stu Tyrrell 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

RIP Doug!

 Trangia 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Very sad news. Another "Legend" has passed away. I enjoyed going to a number of his lectures, and always held him in awe as brilliant mountaineer. His famous Crawl down the Ogre was a tale of amazing courage and endurance.

Post edited at 17:47
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Absolute legend. Met him when he was attempting the NE ridge in 1987. We'd trekked up to Rongbuk and rocked up to base camp. Brews were made and we were made welcome, cheers mate. RIP.

 Deleted bagger 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Good man down.

RIP Doug.

 GCO 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

I met him when he came back from the Makalu trip with Messner. A real legend and not just as a mountaineer. He genuinely cared about the communities in Nepal and elsewhere. A very sad day.

 Sean Kelly 07 Dec 2020
In reply to andyb211:

Obituary from the Guardian by Ed Douglas...

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/dec/07/doug-scott-obituary

 andrew ogilvie 07 Dec 2020
In reply to Sean Kelly:

Sad news. He seemed like a decent, humble, compassionate man when I met him briefly in the 90s...the proper way to be a hero. 

In reply to andyb211:

The man came from an era now lost to us, and made the most of it. RIP Mr Scott.

 Doug 07 Dec 2020

I knew he'd been ill but the news is difficult to comprehend.

I only met him once but was always impressed by what he did.  The only time we met was after a talk he gave when somehow I was in a group with him & a few others around a table in a nearby pub. A journalist who had clearly not bothered going to the talk but had been told that Doug was easily recognisable (John Lennon specs, long hair, beard... - this was the mid 70s, lots of us fitted that description). For some reason the journalist tapped me on my shoulder & asked if I was Doug - I said yes not knowing who he was. He then started asking questions about Baffin & Everest & Doug Scott realised what was going on & said nothing for a while before eventually owning up to being Doug Scott

 mcrtchly 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

So sorry to hear this news. I met him twice. Once as a teenager doing rock climbing in Derbyshire with his brother who was a teacher in my school in Nottingham. Much later when he gave a talk in Dublin. Always a gentleman and engaging to talk with. He will be sadly missed. 

 Le Sapeur 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

I knew Doug quite well, initially from a professional relationship then as ocassional friends.  His 79 years were packed with more life than most of us would manage in 3 lifetimes. Lets not be too sad that he has died at a fine old age and after a (relatively) short illness. I will try to think of his achievements and friendship with a smile on my face. I'll miss the old grump, but, what a life.

 Tom Last 07 Dec 2020
In reply to andyb211:

Doug came and stayed at our house a few years back when he gave lecture down here in Cornwall. He was great company and we had a good old piss up - he was a hit with everyone. We went out climbing the day after at my local crag in Roche, which to my delight he really enjoyed - talk about the seal of approval for little old Roche Rock. A kind, generous and gentle man and of course a true legend. Rest in peace Doug. 

 Timmd 07 Dec 2020
In reply to Southvillain:

> Sad news. For those of us of a certain generation he was an absolute giant, not only for the SW face of Everset but more especially for the Ogre `crawl'. 

Yes, I like the story of him breaking his legs on the Ogre, and saying 'Okay, now the rules have changed'. It indicates a certain amount of grit and and lack of panic, of doing what needs to be done. I can only really amount to telling myself  'Don't f*ck about Tim' towards getting on with things, but his observation lurks in the back of my mind as a positive nudge. My thoughts are with all who met and knew him.

Post edited at 21:37
 waitout 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

My dad took me to see him talk in the late 80's. From the moment that skinny guy with long scruffy hair walked out I knew who I wanted to be like.

In reply to Tom Last:

Lovely to read that.

 Cornish boy 07 Dec 2020
In reply to Trangia:

> Very sad news. Another "Legend" has passed away. I enjoyed going to a number of his lectures, and always held him in awe as brilliant mountaineer. His famous Crawl down the Ogre was a tale of amazing courage and endurance.

Agree with your sentiments entirely. He always seemed genuinely happy to chat to us in the Siabod Cafe after his lectures, despite it being late and him facing a long drive back home. We always found his talks inspirational and he was always so modest about his incredible achievements. 

His book ‘UP AND ABOUT’ is also a great read. I didn’t have any cash to pay for a signed copy of it after one such lecture, and he wasn’t able to take a card payment, so he just gave me the signed copy along with his business card and told me to send him a cheque in the post! I was quite shocked. Trust like that is rare these days. 

I seem to remember a great story about him once being asked what he found the most difficult thing about Himalayan mountaineering. He replied. “Trying to piss through six inches of down clothing with a four inch c*ck!” 

It really has been a bad year as we have now lost another true legend and a great man. 

Sincere condolences to his family.

RIP Doug 

Post edited at 22:18
 JSTaylor 07 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

A live well lived. RIP Doug. 

 Richard Smith 08 Dec 2020
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

A great climber and supporter of all in Nepal.  RIP Doug.

In reply to UKC/UKH News:

One of the best. RIP.

jcm


New Topic
This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Loading Notifications...