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Nasal sprays to defend against Covid

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 Hooo 12 Jan 2021

Someone just told me about these. Originally developed for allergies, they coat your nasal passages and supposedly help protect against viruses. However, I can't seem to find any good information about them. Google results are all mumsnet and ads, so I am pretty dubious.

Does anyone have any reputable data on whether they make a difference? There's a new one called Taffix which is supposed to be Covid specific, but there's also Vicks and Boots Dual defence, which appear to be very similar and a lot cheaper.

I've barely been out of the house since lockdown started, but I have to go to a building site in London next week I want all the protection I can get.

In reply to Hooo:

Go ahead, they aren't going to cause harm. If there is any efficacy from them it will be an end term in the polynomial of protection. 

You are probably better served not drinking alcohol and avoiding strenuous exercise for a couple of days prior and taking some vit D to ensure your immune system is as strong as possible. 

 Cobra_Head 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

There is a nasal spray which has been found to help I think, but it's a specific one AFAIK.

But still, I'd want a bit more research before I thought I'd be safe.

 Lankyman 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

Wouldn't you have to gargle with it as well since the virus could enter through your mouth?

Post edited at 14:27
In reply to Hooo:

I think a can of pepper spray to squirt into the face of unmasked knobheads who get too close in the supermarket is probably the most effective way to defend against Covid.

 Hooo 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Ridge:

I agree it would be effective, but if I try that at work I suspect I might be asked to leave.

 Hooo 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

I had to go to the pharmacist today so I asked their opinion. They'd not heard of it, but reckoned it would be a waste of money. If it was a tenner I'd do it anyway, but Taffix is £52.

 mondite 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

> I agree it would be effective, but if I try that at work I suspect I might be asked to leave.


Spray whoever asks you as well. Its a gift which keeps giving.

At least until the armed response unit turns up.

 Hooo 12 Jan 2021
In reply to mondite:

Yeah but this is a construction site... Being "asked to leave" would probably end with me taking up a valuable ICU bed.

 Huddy 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

I remember listening to a scientist on inside science (bbc radio4) last year discussing the importance of moist mucosal membranes with respect to trapping the virus using mucins chains with in the mucus itself. 
I think he recommended moistening Mucosal membranes in rooms which have dry warm air (centrally heated rooms etc). Simple saline nasal spray would achieve this. 

 Billhook 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

There was an article in the Times/or Telegraph this last weekend about a similar nasal spray being developed.  The makers appeared to claim it gave almost 100% protection against any virus.

Since reading the article I've noticed a cojuple of advers with nasal sprays claiming the same thing.

(but as Lankyman said - it won't stop viruses entering the mouth)I

In reply to Billhook:

> There was an article in the Times/or Telegraph this last weekend about a similar nasal spray being developed.  The makers appeared to claim it gave almost 100% protection against any virus.

This stuff?

https://tinyurl.com/Covid-protection

 Hooo 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Billhook:

I found the article and from the first paragraph this looks like it's genuine. It's starting clinical trials. However it's not available yet, and the ones that are available don't appear to have been trialled against Covid at all. I now strongly suspect that Taffix is nothing but snake oil, and it's being boosted by stories like this about genuinely promising nasal sprays.

 Billhook 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

That  sounds like the bit I read from your summary. (I didn't keep the 'papers.

 Billhook 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Ridge:

Brilliant!!!  

Probably best using a bathroom one with fungal protection.  I believe fungal infections on the lung can be quite serious too.

 Cobra_Head 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Ridge:

> I think a can of pepper spray to squirt into the face of unmasked knobheads who get too close in the supermarket is probably the most effective way to defend against Covid.


A lot of snot is produced though, after administration. Who's cleaning that up?

In reply to Huddy:

> I remember listening to a scientist on inside science (bbc radio4) last year discussing the importance of moist mucosal membranes with respect to trapping the virus using mucins chains with in the mucus itself. 

First Defence and Boots own brand contain carrageenan as the active ingredient. This probably works in the way you describe, by preventing the mucosal linings from getting too dry.

This is a clinically proven prophylactic treatment.

 Bilberry 12 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

> Someone just told me about these.

Why oh why is this kind of vague snake oil rumour shit so internet sticky, yet solid evidence so easily ignored?

In reply to captain paranoia:

> This is a clinically proven prophylactic treatment.

Should stress: for cold and flu...

 freeflyer 13 Jan 2021
In reply to Ridge:

You should go on Dragon's Den with that.

Cracker

 Chris Craggs Global Crag Moderator UKH Supporter 13 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

We have (had) been using Vicks First Defence, plus hand sanitizer, on every flight for 10+ years. The lack of colds caught compared to when we flew less and were ill more often suggests there is something to be said for it,

Chris

 Greenbanks 13 Jan 2021
In reply to Hooo:

The way the printed news media operates, more likely that the paper published what in essence is a press release from a commercial, on condition that advertising revenue follows...harsh & cynical, maybe. But widespread in the industry.

 Bilberry 13 Jan 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Yes - for hand sanitizer.  There's evidence behind that.

I can't find anything credible on nose sprays.  Your experience was just as credibly down to the change in your passport colour...

 Chris Craggs Global Crag Moderator UKH Supporter 13 Jan 2021
In reply to Bilberry:

> Yes - for hand sanitizer.  There's evidence behind that.

> I can't find anything credible on nose sprays.  Your experience was just as credibly down to the change in your passport colour...

Unlikely, I have had the same coloured one for years,

Chris


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