UKH

NEWS: Kilian Jornet Summits Everest

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 UKC/UKH News 22 May 2017
Kilian Jornet everest montage, 3 kbCatalan ultra runner Kilian Jornet has summited Everest from the Tibetan side in a time of 26 hours, climbing without fixed ropes or oxygen.

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 Bwox 22 May 2017
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

> 'I have moved slowly and stopping every few steps to recover'

Isn't that pretty much normal on Everest?


Also, UKC, should it not be ...Rongbuck monastery
3
 ianstevens 22 May 2017
In reply to Bwox:

> Isn't that pretty much normal on Everest?Also, UKC, should it not be ...Rongbuck monastery

Arguably yes, but.... Kilian.
1
 Purple 22 May 2017
In reply to Bwox:

Also, UKC, should it not be ...Rongbuck monastery

Nope, it's Wrongbuk monastery


 Michael Gordon 22 May 2017
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Interesting, any more info? (where/how long he stopped for rests/sleep on the descent etc)
 L.A. 22 May 2017
In reply to Michael Gordon:

http://blog.summitsofmylife.com/

Everest Base Camp (5,100m) – Everest Advanced Base Camp (6,400m): 4h35

2h rest at Everest Advanced Base Camp

Everest Advanced Base Camp (6,400m) – Summit (8,848m): 26h (15’ rest in Field Campo 3 on the way up and 1 hour on the way down)

Summit (8,848m) – Everest Advanced Base Camp (6,500m): 38h

Everest Advanced Base Camp (6,500m) – Everest Base Camp (5,100m)

1
 Michael Gordon 22 May 2017
In reply to L.A.:

Thanks. If my maths is correct then excluding breaks it looks like he took just over 19 hrs Advanced Base to Summit, then 21 hrs descending
 Hardonicus 22 May 2017
In reply to L.A.:

Strava or it didn't happen...
2
In reply to Michael Gordon:

I'm reading the information that he took 26 hrs in total from base camp to summit, then 12 hrs back to advance base camp where he stopped.

Given the 4.35 he took from BC to ABC and the 2 hrs rest he had at ABC, that means he took 19hrs 25mins from ABC to summit and 12 hrs back k down.

He seemed pretty set on starting and ending and base camp, I get the impression that most ascents on the north side are considered as starting from ABC.
 L.A. 22 May 2017
In reply to Michael Gordon:
Your maths isnt correct though 12 hrs Summit to ABC including a one hour rest at C3
Post edited at 16:31
In reply to Hardonicus:

That's one more kom section I'm never going to beat.
 Michael Gordon 22 May 2017
In reply to L.A.:

Thanks, I must be having a bad day. I couldn't work out how he took longer to descend than ascend! Thought he really must have been ill...
 Doug 22 May 2017
How does this compare to Troillet & Loretan in the 1980s ?

 Fergal 22 May 2017
In reply to Doug:

Hans Kammerlander 1996 16hrs ABC to summit sans bottled gas.
 thommi 22 May 2017
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

Incredible stuff! Congratulations kilian! ????
 Chris Harris 22 May 2017
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

>The orignal intention was to set a total speed record for the ascent and descent; but being ill, he chose to stop the clock at ABC, 38 hours in, rather than returning immediately to Base Camp.

Punter. When's he going back for the full tick?

Also, there's an "i" missing from "original".

1
 Damo 23 May 2017
In reply to Doug:

> How does this compare to Troillet & Loretan in the 1980s ?

They did 38hrs up, 3hrs down the Japanese/Hornbein Couloir route (the 'Supercouloir'), from their camp near the bottom of the north face.

But they were on a totally different route - shorter but steeper - that was totally unprepared, no track made, no ropes at all, and in deep(ish) monsoon snow (Aug 1986) that involved unroped climbing well above 8000m in the upper Hornbein Couloir.

IMO there are too many differences to make any truly clinical comparison, but in climbing terms the '86 climb was far superior. And it was over 30 years ago :-o

 Hardonicus 23 May 2017
In reply to Damo:

Didn't they bum slide most of the way down?
 Damo 23 May 2017
In reply to Hardonicus:

> Didn't they bum slide most of the way down?

Yep. And not usually mentioned is that a couple of hours after they got back to their camp, an avalanche swept the couloir.

The Supercouloir has ice up to 60 degrees near the bottom (they actually climbed a line to the left of the gully itself in the lower part) and rock steps in the upper couloir, so it really is much more of a climb than the normal north ridge route.
In reply to Damo:

> IMO there are too many differences to make any truly clinical comparison, but in climbing terms the '86 climb was far superior. And it was over 30 years ago :-o

Yes, in mountaineering terms there really is no comparison. I'm afraid I find the treatment of Everest (or any mountain) as little more than a race track little more edifying than the rest of the Everest circus, however physically impressive the times are.

 Damo 23 May 2017
In reply to Robert Durran:

> ... I find the treatment of Everest (or any mountain) as little more than a race track little more edifying than the rest of the Everest circus, however physically impressive the times are.

I don't see the harm that much. I do find funny the use of 'fastest known time / FKT'. I understand this was initiated to head-off the kind of arguments that follow claims, that someone that nobody knew of did the thing faster some time previously. Often such inaccurate claims were simply the result of poor (or non-existent) research.

While I think this might have been justifiable some years ago, the likelihood of someone now - at least since the advent of social media, Strava etc - clocking up some super fast time on anything significant and not broadcasting it to the world is unlikely. So I think it's a bit of false humility now, a bit disingenuous, despite its justifiable origins.

It can also be used to legitimate odd routes or non-standard Start/Finish points, and I can already see elsewhere on the web people asking questions comparing Kammerlander and Stangl's 16hr north ridge Everest climbs (ABC to Summit). Jornet's self-imposed rule of going to/from the last place of civilisation is a nice one in some ways, but quite a rod for his own back, as shown now when sickness prevented him from completing his self-determined 'route'.

I noticed from the short videos published, he seemed to be in incredibly good shape as he got back down, hardly tired at all, and apparently he spent plenty of time at ABC signing autographs before having a rest. Climbing traditions be damned, it's an amazing feat he's pulled off.
 thommi 23 May 2017
In reply to Robert Durran:

Please prescribe to us how you'd like mountains to be treated... for our collective edification of course.

1
In reply to thommi:

> Please prescribe to us how you'd like mountains to be treated...

In impeccable alpine style, accepting the challenge of the mountain as it is without the externally contrived "race" against a stopwatch.

Having said that, I accept that speed climbing against the clock in the "playgrounds" of the Alps and Yosemite has resulted in the development of the techniques and confidence which have made truly ground breaking impeccable ascents possible such as Steck's route on Annapurna and the Fitzroy traverse by Caldwell and Honnold.
 ianstevens 23 May 2017
In reply to Robert Durran:

> In impeccable alpine style, accepting the challenge of the mountain as it is without the externally contrived "race" against a stopwatch.

By "alpine style" I assume you mean fast, light, and in a single push? Surely a speed attempt is the epitomy of this?
 Damo 23 May 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

> By "alpine style" I assume you mean fast, light, and in a single push? Surely a speed attempt is the epitomy of this?

I believe for the level of purity Robert is aiming for, one cannot use the beaten path, route marked by ropes, and the Chinese ladder up the Second Step, for it to be alpine-style.

And Kilian went on the route before he climbed it, and drowned some kittens, and therefore must die...
1
In reply to ianstevens:

> By "alpine style" I assume you mean fast, light, and in a single push? Surely a speed attempt is the epitomy of this?

No, by "alpine style" I mean in a single push carrying everything with you. This need not necessarily be particularly fast or particularly light, though obviously there are limits to how "heavy" it can be and therefore how long you can carry supplies for.
In reply to Damo:
> I believe for the level of purity Robert is aiming for, one cannot use the beaten path, route marked by ropes, and the Chinese ladder up the Second Step, for it to be alpine-style.

It certainly makes it flawed.

> And Kilian went on the route before he climbed it, and drowned some kittens, and therefore must die.......

I wouldn't go that far, but he certainly ought to be reported to the RSPCA if that is true.
Post edited at 12:29
 Damo 23 May 2017
In reply to Damo:

> ...It can also be used to legitimate odd routes or non-standard Start/Finish points, and I can already see elsewhere on the web people asking questions comparing Kammerlander and Stangl's 16hr north ridge Everest climbs (ABC to Summit).

Such as:


"Climbing Everest in 26 hours, Kilian Jornet successfully met his challenge to reach the Roof of the World, 8848 meters alone and without oxygen. Kilian Jornet announces, via his news agency, that he has established a new fastest known time (FKT), ie a new speed record: 26 hours from Rongbuk Monastery (5100 M) to the top. But if this FKT is innovative, the schedules of Kilian Jornet show that it did not really beat the record of ascension held by Hans Kammerlander and Christian Stangl....

...a few days ago Kilian Jornet climbed up to 8400 meters in record time. Rodolphe Popier believes that "if he had left the ABC and not Rongbuk, he would have exploded the records of Kammerlander and Stangl, within ten hours perhaps! ". Moreover, the time of departure - 22h the previous day - tends to suggest that Kilian did not imagine reaching the summit at midnight, but much earlier, probably mid-afternoon at the latest. Kilian Jornet therefore established a new reference time between the "end of the road" and the summit; Without breaking the "official" record, he set his own record, in his own way, as he set his records at Mont Blanc from the church of Courmayeur or Chamonix: Kilian Jornet climbs the mountains in his own way.


http://www.widermag.com/news-pourquoi-kilian-jornet-battu-record-everest-meme-il-capable
 thommi 23 May 2017
In reply to Robert Durran:

But he drowned them in capsule style!!!

 Niblet 23 May 2017
So did he set a new record or not? Or is it impossible to compare because he chose different starting points and then didn't go all the way down to base camp? I haven't been keeping up.
 Michael Gordon 24 May 2017
In reply to Niblet:

It seems unlikely, reading Fergal's post above. 16 hrs vs 19 hrs. Particularly since he stopped the clock at Advanced Base.
 Damo 24 May 2017
In reply to Michael Gordon:

I have a feeling he'll try again, but from ABC this time.

I reckon, weather permitting, he could go ABC-summit in under 10hrs.
 tony 24 May 2017
In reply to Damo:

> I have a feeling he'll try again, but from ABC this time. I reckon, weather permitting, he could go ABC-summit in under 10hrs.

Try again this year, or is that too much to ask, even for someone of his ability and fitness?
 Damo 24 May 2017
In reply to tony:

> Try again this year, or ...?

No, I mean this week.

 tony 24 May 2017
In reply to Damo:

I did wonder ...
 JuneBob 28 May 2017
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

He just had another go. 17hrs from ABC.
 Jack 28 May 2017
In reply to JuneBob:

> He just had another go. 17hrs from ABC.

Is that up and down?
 leon 1 28 May 2017
In reply to Jack:
Looks like that was one way. From his blog...
Kilian Jornet summited Mount Everest twice in a week without using supplemental oxygen. For this ascent, Kilian Jornet left on May 27th from Advanced Base Camp (6.500m) and it took him 17 hours to the summit in a very windy day. From there, he returned to the Advanced Base Camp where he is resting with Seb Montaz. More info soon.

 leon 1 28 May 2017
In reply to leon 1:
His blog now reports it as 28 1/2 hrs up and down
http://blog.summitsofmylife.com/

 Topper Harley 28 May 2017
In reply to UKC/UKH News:

I would be really interested to see what he could have done if he had continued to the summit on his first 'acclimatisation' trip when he went from ABC - 8400m in under 6 hours. Surely that would have meant he could have got to the summit in around 10 hours total?

While 17h for ABC to summit is obviously an exceptional time for most people, especially after what he did a few days ago, it looks like his previous effort has taken a toll on him.
 Damo 30 May 2017
In reply to Niblet:

This article gives something like a decent summary:

http://trailrunnermag.com/people/news/kilian-jornet-summits-everest.html

"According to his website, Jornet is claiming a “new speed record” and a “new fastest-known time” for the May 21 ascent from Base-Camp. However, Jornet’s public relations representatives say that, “There is no evidence of an existing FKT [starting from Base Camp], and [so] we are not talking about breaking records at any time, as there was no record to be broken.”

Indeed, it is nearly impossible to compare Jornet’s May 21st ascent to Stangl and Kammerlander’s ascents, given their different starting points. The May 21st ascent is, in fact, the only known speed attempt via this particular route.

The May 27th ascent is comparable to the previous Northeast Ridge ascents, but it is on par with Kammerlander’s 1996 record—still 18 minutes shy of Stangl’s 2006 record, which is the current time to beat."
weeve 30 May 2017
In reply to UKC/UKH News:
when is he coming up here to the lake district to do the Bob Graham Round? Im more suited to 13 days than 13 hours something - but I might have my 2 year old take him
Post edited at 09:43

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