UKH

/ Low midge-risk crags Eastern Grit

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RosieYates - on 30 Aug 2018

Looks like very low wind tomorrow across Eastern Grit. Does anyone have any bright ideas for crags that are less terrible with midges this time of year?

jb2006 on 30 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

Yarncliffe might be better than the high edges - or "shock horror" you could go to Stoney, not many midges there

The Reaper on 30 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

Looks like a sunny day is forecast so I'd take my chances anywhere tbh. Not been midged once this summer even on a still evening.

 

Bulls Crack - on 30 Aug 2018
In reply to The Reaper:

Yep, low midge year

Don't worry about it

EarlyBird - on 30 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

Well, sorry folks, but Millstone was dreadful this evening.

RosieYates - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

Thanks all for the suggestions. Yeah I've definitely been midged on still evenings in the Peak this year, and I heard Thursday eve was bad for it.  

Chris Craggs - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

Higgar Tor always seems to be less midgy than most - it can catch a bit of a breeze and there isn't much in the way of nearby swampiness.

There is a decent little set of routes there - aside from the steep stuff on the Leaning Block,

Chris

mrphilipoldham - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

This might be controversial but I've barely seen a single midge on the western grit this year, let alone been bothered by any. Worth a shot?

danm on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to EarlyBird:

Yup, even Apparent North, my go-to for getting any breeze going was still and midgey hell. The Heeley boulder is a good option for urbanites right now!

Offwidth - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

On windless humid days go south... Black Rocks, Rowtor Rocks, Eastwood, Turning Stone, Matlock Bank, Shining Cliff, Alport Stone etc. Or Limestone, although it will usually be no better than these. If there is any light wind stay high and facing it (why Higgar can be good.. only really sheltered from N winds).

ChrisBrooke - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

I must have got lucky - I've been out on the Eastern edges multiple times a week (more or less) since May, often around sunset, and haven't really had any serious midge problems apart from one grim evening at Gardoms. It has really been the most fantastic summer. 

The forecast for the weekend looks sunny and windy enough that I'd just go wherever I fancied and try my luck. 

 

Webster - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

the combination of long cold winter and dry hot summer has done wonders for the midge problem this year! fewest midges i have ever seen in scotland, there must be practically none down south! those complaining of midge hell on grit recently have probably never been to Skye or Glen Nevis in may!

planetmarshall on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to Webster:

> ...those complaining of midge hell on grit recently have probably never been to Skye or Glen Nevis in may!

You would be incorrect on that assumption

 

RosieYates - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to Webster:

Yeah I was on Skye in May. They are a different breed up there.

Still, I've had a few evenings made less enjoyable by the midges here on Eastern grit this summer. I was just trying to get some advice. 

 

steveb2006 - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

Like quite a few others here Ive had no problems with midges on the eastern grit.  Ive not been climbing in the evenings though which tends to be the worst time.  Presumably you are intending to climb in the day time over the weekend so Id have thought you'd be ok anywhere.

Bulls Crack - on 31 Aug 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

Sorry but the consensus does seem to be 'nesh'  - this is a good year!

Offwidth - on 01 Sep 2018
In reply to Bulls Crack:

If nesh is a consensus I must have missed it and those thinking there are no midges in the Peak must be stupid people. Just because this has been a good year,  being both drier and consitently windier than normal,  it doesn't mean the buggers are not waiting for the light levels and wind to drop (as some posters here rightly confirm is the case now). Summer midges on Stanage in particular can be dreadful... maybe not Scottish dreadful but certainly so bad  that you will want to stop climbing very soon, if not immediately (even if mainly covered up), when they come out. Thinking about wind direction or these altermative venues can be very useful in avoiding a ruined day.

RosieYates - on 01 Sep 2018
In reply to Bulls Crack:

It's almost like people have different experiences, no? Either way this wasn't intended to be a poll nor a request to be told that I must be imagining it. I just wanted to see if anyone had any advice to alleviate a problem that I and others have occasionally had during the evening at various crags. 

I was close to stating in my original post that I know it hasn't been a terrible year, that I know the basics of midge avoidance, that I wasn't too interested in hearing about Scottish midge, etc - but I thought that I should probably think better of UKC forum users and not go into the post expecting to patronised. Clearly I was wrong. 

Si dH - on 01 Sep 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

I think you being overly sensitive. Almost any question on ukc seems to spark a debate or disagreement; it doesn't mean they are aimed at you.

Wrt the original question, I don't think there are low-midge-risk grit crags without wind. You need good conditions (some wind, some sun) or else you need to go to the limestone instead. However, if you are desperate to climb grit and willing to put up with a bit of pain then the crags furthest from the moors and peat are on average best. Cratcliffe and some of the others in that area would be my bet, but personally I think it's still a bad idea.

Offwidth - on 01 Sep 2018
In reply to Si dH:

Those southern crags I listed are low (not zero)  risk. I've worked on all the BMC Peak grit guides and thats my experience at least. On really bad days Limestone will be just as bad as these.

Post edited at 09:04
Si dH - on 01 Sep 2018
In reply to Offwidth:

Yes, I had missed your list - agree they are a good suggestion

Bulls Crack - on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

I apologise but I was being flippant rater than patronising....and just enjoying my local grit quarry being midge free this year!

olddirtydoggy - on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to RosieYates:

A great place to avoid the midges is Wharcliffe crags in N Sheff. It might not be Peak district but it's in the E grit guidebook and has some wonderful routes. I've had light midges on there only once and we're up there a lot.

Offwidth - on 06 Sep 2018
In reply to olddirtydoggy:

I'd agree with that. Not as good as the southern crags though. Wharncliffe is also somewhat in tne rain shadow of the peak, exposed at a lowish altitude and has a rocky base so makes a great quick drying winter crag.


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