/ Camera bag for the mountains

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
Smelly Fox - on 13 May 2019

Im getting into full frame photography, and was looking for some advise as to what people use to bring their kit into the mountains? 

I’ll be taking a telephoto, and a couple of primes, as well as a tripod. At the moment I’m just using socks to pad out the lenses, and a camera bag, but I’d quite like something a bit more easy access for the lenses. I figured some sort of insert bag might be useful, rather than a dedicated camera bag, then I can use whatever sized pack I want depending on what I’m doing. Any thoughts?

Cheers!

Report
balmybaldwin - on 13 May 2019
In reply to Smelly Fox:

I have a Lowepro Flipside AW400 which is very good as a camera bag, and I happilly use it on sizeable treks, but it's not a mountaineering pack, and whilst ok stomping up a hill, I certainly wouldn't want to use it if climbing as it's wide and a little restrictive.

I did notice the other day that Lowepro do a range of bags designed for hill walking/mountaineering which is probably where I would look first.

The issue with a insert bag will be finding one that fits in an ordinary day pack without making the whole thing a chore to access... you might as well use separate lens bags and one for the body?

Report
Mac fae Stirling - on 13 May 2019
In reply to Smelly Fox:

I take two cameras {Fuji X Series} up the hills; one with a wide angle and one with a telephoto. I also take a tiny bag wth spare batteries, SD card & cleaning cloth.  I just put them in a 45 litre rucksack along with my normal kit. I don’t bother with a tripod anymore but I used to strap one on the outside without too much fuss.

If it looks wet I put each in a waterproof bag.

Post edited at 14:09
Report
Smelly Fox - on 13 May 2019
In reply to Mac fae Stirling:

Thanks for the reply’s.

> I take two cameras {Fuji X Series} up the hills; one with a wide angle and one with a telephoto. I also take a tiny bag wth spare batteries, SD card & cleaning cloth.  I just put them in a 45 litre rucksack along with my normal kit. I don’t bother with a tripod anymore but I used to strap one on the outside without too much fuss.

> If it looks wet I put each in a waterproof bag.

This is pretty much what I’m doing at the moment, although I can afford an extra body, hence the need for some easy access options for the lenses.

balmybaldwin - I get your points there. I’ll have a look at the Lowepro range, although I was hoping for a solution that doesn’t involve more rucksacks, as the wife is already complaining about the number I have cluttering the house! Maybe I can sneak another one under the radar though...

Report
nathan79 - on 13 May 2019
In reply to Smelly Fox:

"It's a camera bag dear/not a rucksack!". Guaranteed to work, no?!

Report
OwenM - on 13 May 2019
Frank R. on 14 May 2019
In reply to Smelly Fox:

All the dedicated "wilderness camera backpacks" I have looked at before have been heavy, uncomfortable to carry and with downright stupidly designed back systems, compared to normal outdoor packs from the likes of Millet, Deuter and others. Might have changed in the recent years, but I still think a camera bag company can't make a backpack that would be actually good to carry on your back...(I would love to be proven wrong, though!)

I would just get a lightly padded insert or a couple of lens pouches, like others suggested. It's more versatile, you can still put the insert or pouches into a small ultralight summit pack. If on easy terrain, I just attach the camera with my favourite lens via a couple of biners and short cord to my shoulder straps (to take the pain out of my neck). Works a treat and is essentially free and more secure than those overpriced backpack shoulder strap attachment systems as well. The nice thing about lens pouches is that you can just put them together on a sling, and have a lens bandolier for short excursions out of camp.

Report
Marc Langley - on 14 May 2019
In reply to Smelly Fox:

Hi Smelly.

I would suggest you look at Shimoda Designs. Working as a professional adventure photographer I have often battled against this issue. These bags has resolved all my problems. Owned by the previous designer of F Stops bags Ian Miller they are truly epic bags. 

I use the 60 litre and can carry all my camera gear plus a trad rack. 100 meter static line, food and clothes and it is super comfy.

https://www.shimodadesigns.com/

https://www.dalephotographic.co.uk/search?controller=search&orderby=position&orderway=desc&search_query=shimoda&tm_submit_search=

Report
Marc Langley - on 14 May 2019
In reply to Frank R.:

F-STOP or Shimoda have been doing this for years. 

Report
Frank R. on 14 May 2019
In reply to Marc Langley:

Thanks. It has been a while since I looked at some camera backpacks I heard about the F-Stop ones, but thought it was mostly an urban focused brand. And Shimoda is a new one for me. Back in the day I looked there were mostly just those so-so packs from Lowepro, and for normal photography I just toted an overfilled Domke F2, issued by the paper, like everybody else... (my spine does not thank me for that now!). Finally upgraded to ThinkTank and the then excellent Newsvest (Are these still made? Before all the terrorism craze, now it looks a bit too militaristic to be comfortable carrying one in the city), although it was not outdoorsy at all. But since I mostly leave the heavy full frame DSLR and take just a small Fuji for any trips nowadays, lens pouches inside normal backpack work quite well for me. After lugging two 1D-style DSLRs with 2.8 zooms for years, a small Fuji feels like Pentax MX or Leica film days again!

Post edited at 19:14
Report
Tringa on 10:40 Fri
In reply to Frank R.:

Agree about inserts and/or padded pouches. There are loads of them on Ebay. The only drawback I can see is that although the adverts for them give the dimensions you can't be absolutely sure they will fit your rucksack until you get them. I think the dedicate camera rucksack are just way too expensive.

Dave

Report
Mike7 on 17:51 Fri
In reply to Smelly Fox:

Also worth thinking about your carry system when you're moving through the mountains.

If all you intend to shoot are static, long exposure style tripod captures - then great.  Get bag recommendations.

If you're also going to shoot while (somewhat) mobile, then it's worth looking into a clip system.

Some of the better options are repurposed solutions that have been attached to shoulder & camera.

Quick to secure/release, stable when moving, and readily accessible.

Report

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.