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Food processor recommendation

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On a damp May Bank Holiday Monday, it has come to this. I am researching kitchenware via UKC. 

 

OK, I have finally hit the limits of my little Russell Hobbs jug-style blender and need to get a "proper" food processor.

4 times now, trying to follow a recipe that involves making "patties" and then just frying them (sweet potato and chickpea "burgers" twice, beetroot and chickpea rosti, and a butternut squash skewer thing, it's been at best a salvaged disaster and at worst just a disaster, as I have to keep adding water so the blender doesn't jam.

Blender still has its place (smoothies, houmous, carrot puree for a soup base, making breadcrumbs etc) but clearly I need something with a bit more horsepower.

Hit me with your recommendations please.

I'd rather be in the £150 range than the £750 range

 ianstevens 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

I picked up (whined until I got give one for my birthday) a Kenwood MultiPro Classic (note - not compact!) last autumn. It’s been great for everything I’ve thrown at it - soup, pesto, grating, chopping and pastry making. Deals with the burger making you describe perfectly. Different model numbers come with different accessories (I’d recommend the glass blender) but are all the same base unit. 3L bowl by default so plenty big enough. It’s £150 on AO at the moment.

Only criticism is that the numerical scale only goes up to 9. Either make it 1-10 or 1-11 for comedy value/‘more power’.

Post edited at 12:15
 MonkeyPuzzle 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Cuisinart. American brand not so well known over here so you're not paying the Kitchen Aid or Sage premium. Used them for fifteen years or more and never once had one break, only upgraded. Easy Prep Pro is the one I have which is very simple but great for the tasks it does - blending, slicing, grating. A bit more money (£225 at Hart's of Stur) is the Expert Prep Pro which is what I would have got if we didn't already have a stand mixer.

 Hardonicus 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Magimix surely? Built like a tank, powerful induction motor, will obliterate anything and last for years (mine is 8 years and counting)

Post edited at 12:21
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Thanks so far! Three sensible and reasonable suggestions already. All three brands are the ones that have been leaping out at me already. I see there are plenty of Magimixes on eBay, used or refurbed, sub £100!

I'll see what other recommendations come out. I keep reading (in Good Housekeeping reviews) about how great they are chopping cucumbers. Isn't that really easy to do by hand, with a knife? I am more interested in "can it do the heavy duty stuff that makes my blender stick" . I know you addressed this Ian Just surprised that it isn't mentioned more elsewhere...

 ianstevens 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

But once you own a machine to do it with little effort you will never chop by hand again! The second bonus of this (in my experience) is that my partner also gets annoyed at me for not doing it by hand. Double value!

In reply to ianstevens:

Oh I know that phenomenon well. Put it to good effect on Saturday in a totally different context with the first use of my extravagant "Metolius Personal Anchor System" after years of "just tie off a sling to the right length". No more stuck knots for this Straggler  

 MonkeyPuzzle 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

If by heavy duty you mean blending smooth then get a good and powerful stick blender. If you want it to do slicey dicey stuff as well then you'll compromise on power at your price point.

 Greenbanks 03 May 2021
In reply to ianstevens:

Chopping by hand is one of my vicarious pleasures - we have a posh blender (which no doubt will play a musical accompaniment to suit any combination of veg, fruit or other foodstuff...) but I never use it. Use blender - give up on life...

PS. Being indoors on a BH might be resulting in my take on this.

In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

One of those hand held things? I am talking about blending about 1kg of butternut squash, sweet potato and/or chick peas into a "thick paste"

Aren't those hand held stick blenders just for smaller jobs like a quick smoothie or crushing ice? 

 MonkeyPuzzle 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Yep. Pro kitchens use bigger versions for pureeing/blending gigantic stockpots full of stuff and you can get really powerful home versions that'll do that job well. Problem with thick purees is that they cake onto the sides on wider food processors and leave the blades blending thin air. Stick blenders you can point at whatever you want blending and it gets blended.

KitchenAid do a cordless one I'm eyeing up when my old Braun one kicks the bucket.

Edit, you make a smooth paste for veggie patties? What recipe is that? My partner's veggie so I'm always on the lookout.

Post edited at 17:13
 Tony Buckley 03 May 2021
In reply to Hardonicus:

> Magimix surely? Built like a tank, powerful induction motor, will obliterate anything and last for years 

Ours is of the order of 25 years old.  The worst I can say about it is that you spend some of the time you save in preparation on washing up afterwards.  Otherwise it hasn't missed a beat.

T.

In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

> Yep. Pro kitchens use bigger versions for pureeing/blending gigantic stockpots full of stuff and you can get really powerful home versions that'll do that job well. Problem with thick purees is that they cake onto the sides on wider food processors and leave the blades blending thin air. Stick blenders you can point at whatever you want blending and it gets blended.

> KitchenAid do a cordless one I'm eyeing up when my old Braun one kicks the bucket.

Thanks! Hope it didn't look like I was being argumentative - I wasn't  

> Edit, you make a smooth paste for veggie patties? What recipe is that? My partner's veggie so I'm always on the lookout.

From a book by the "BOSH" chaps. Sweet potato and chickpea burger. I'll take a quick pic and upload it (sorry, BOSH guys). I think I tried a similar online one. Both of them relied on a nice blended paste you could shape into patties and just lightly fry (or in one case, bake slightly and then fry). My unsuitable "jug" blender (£30 Russell Hobbs thing from Lidl - great for what it is supposed to do, I was just pushing it too far) just jams with the thick paste and I had to keep adding water to get it to keep going, and then my paste was too sloppy and I had to bake these really sloppy wet patties to get rid of water. And THEN fry them! Gaaah

In reply to Blue Straggler:

correction, the Bosh one is black beans, must have been the online one that was chickpeas. Same issue each time, I need to be able to make a thicker paste 


 MonkeyPuzzle 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

This one? https://www.bosh.tv/recipes/healthy-vegan-burger 

Their method makes it sound easy but yeah a normal processor would need loads of water adding to get it to blend smoothly

Stick blender, potato ricer or old school potato mill would do it.

 Hardonicus 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

A stick blender is an essential but different tool. Saves on washing up if your pureeing in the pot, blending soups etc. You can get a good one for 25 quid, some come with a mini chopper which is ace for small amounts of stuff that don't warrant a Magimix e.g. ginger garlic paste for curries. Check for high wattage motor.

A stick blender ain't gonna wash for the big gun jobs like chopping mince up or making pastry though.

The point about washing up made above is a good one. I find the Magimix gets much more use since I moved to a house with a dishwasher, but then I'm quick with a knife.

Post edited at 18:13
 nufkin 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

I've been pondering the same thing myself - currently back-and-forthing between a Magimix and a Sage, on the basis that it will hopefully last a good amount of time and so paying a wee bit more might be better in the long run.
There's a nice review of a few here:

https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/10/best-food-processor-equipment-review.html

(Breville sells as Sage in the UK, I believe. I think Cuisinart aren't available in Europe in the suggested model, officially at least)

 ianstevens 03 May 2021
In reply to Greenbanks:

Haha could well be a contributing factor! In contrast I am lazy and own a 3 pack of IKEA knives which were around £10... so aren’t the best.

 mbh 03 May 2021
In reply to Hardonicus:

>some come with a mini chopper which is ace for small amounts of stuff that don't warrant a Magimix e.g. ginger garlic paste for curries.

I found ours was good for sloppy things like hummus and guacamole, but too big for jobs like ginger garlic paste. As others have said about other bits of kit, the blades just ended up  spinning in air while the paste was splatted all over the sides. Same with our smaller but otherwise excellent and 10+ years old Cuisinart.

I'd love a Magimix.

For pastes I go back to my really heavy pestle and mortar. After 20ish years I still can't recall which is the pestle and which is the mortar, but it is just great to have a thing of beauty that just works.

 MonkeyPuzzle 03 May 2021
In reply to mbh:

> After 20ish years I still can't recall which is the pestle and which is the mortar, 

Like the pre-Roman histories of the Celtic, Brythonic and Germanic tribes, it's been lost forever which is the pestle and which is the mortar. You just need to know you have both together before you can accurately refer to it.

In reply to Blue Straggler:

Washing up isn’t an issue. I weirdly like it. I have put a “reward:effort ratio” spin on it 

 MonkeyPuzzle 03 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

In which case never buy a garlic press.

In reply to MonkeyPuzzle: I learned the garlic press trick on these forums a few months ago and brought mine out of its premature long retirement. Frozen garlic is the trick 

 Hardonicus 04 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Chop your garlic, add a pinch of salt, then scrape it across the board with the flat of your knife pressed down hard. Pureed garlic in 30 seconds.

In reply to Hardonicus:

If I didn't already own a garlic press, I would do this  

 kevin stephens 04 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Ask JCT formerly (?) of this parish. She bought a posh one with her winnings on TV’s Come Dine With Me

In reply to kevin stephens:

> Ask JCT formerly (?) of this parish. She bought a posh one with her winnings on TV’s Come Dine With Me

Ha! Sadly I don't have time to listen to yet another regurgitation of her entire biography leading up to the selection of a food processor. 

In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

We’ve got the KitchenAid cordless blender which has an attachment which looks big enough to mix plaster. Big thumbs up for their food processor too

 Jamie Wakeham 04 May 2021
In reply to Blue Straggler:

I reckon it's three separate devices.  A decent stick blender does one thing; the hefty machine another.  But the Kenwood mini chopper kind of sits between the two, and of the three it's the one that gets the lion's share of the work!  I could conceive of not having the stick blender or the big food processor, but you will pry my mini chopper from my cold dead fingers.  Yes, I get that the smutty will read that sentence differently.

Our big processor is a Kenwood Multipro, and I think I'll need to decide which niece or nephew will inherit it.

Post edited at 21:16
In reply to Blue Straggler:

>  I'd rather be in the £150 range than the £750 range

You're probably going to hate me for this, but consider a Thermomix. If you like eating the sort of stuff it makes then it could be the thing for you. We've had one for 8 years and it gets used every other day.

https://www.vorwerk.co.uk/thermomix/home/

Post edited at 13:27
In reply to Toerag:

That looks pretty awesome, if a bit "all your eggs in one basket"

I knew about InstaPot and their ilk but not this. 

If I'd seen this maybe a year ago then it might have been investigated further, but I just got a new "smart" combi (convection and microwave) oven and single zone plug-and-play induction hob both of which are excellent. 

I think I am going for a second hand Magimix 3200XL (barely used, advertised locally on Gumtree)

 nikoid 08:35 Thu
In reply to Hardonicus:

> but then I'm quick with a knife.

What, like Steven Seagal?

 Hardonicus 09:26 Thu
In reply to nikoid:

Like Michael Gove...

In reply to nufkin:

Oh, I bought my Cuisinart 14-Cup Food Processor not so long ago from Amazon. It was important for me that there was an opportunity to cut into small particles. I have had success chopping less than a clove of garlic. I do this often and sometimes i add a bit of coarse salt to help.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07FNJKCM7?th=1&ascsubtag=5121915%7Cn0b7828318f034ada983480a86383792313&linkCode=gs4&tag=seriouseats03-21

Post edited at 15:03
In reply to Blue Straggler:

May I jump in with a related question please, seeing as we're having this discussion.

Ive finally decided that its time to buy a magimix, which I hope will last as long as I do. I gave away a inherited 20 year old one when I immigrated, and I've regretted it ever since!

For a small household, are there any drawbacks to buying a smaller model over the standard version, or vice versa? I'm tempted just to get the standard, but don't want to be forever scraping down the sides. But if I buy the smaller one, will I be able to fit everything in? It's quite an investment,  so I'd appreciate advice from those with experience. 


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