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September film thread

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Five Graves to Cairo, Billy Wilder's second film as a director.

The war film that Hitchcock never made (in fairness Hitchcock made the brilliant Foreign Correspondent). Pretty much four characters talking in a room, plus a “chorus/narrator” and some extras, clearly based on a play, but actually a brilliant war film with cracking intelligent dialogue and plotting, and it really keeps you on your toes. Amazing that it was made during the Second World War!
Eric von Stroheim hamming it up as Rommel, is superb, and it's astonishing that Anne Baxter was only 20 when they made this film. 

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In reply to Blue Straggler:

Hitchcock comparison because there is a main protagonist somewhat haphazardly thrown into the midst of a complex plot and having to try to stay one step ahead of the antagonists, and there is quite a MacGuffin. 

Post edited at 14:22
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 toddles 03 Sep 2020
In reply to Blue Straggler:

There is a good film on BBC iplayer called Dirt Road to Lafayette, you might have to search for it under films, it's from BBC Scotland.

It's about a young Scottish boy who plays the accordion and he is visiting relatives in the deep South of the USA with his Dad, they are both grieving.

Nice gentle film, about how music heals and brings people together.

Nice Cajun and Zydeco music

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In reply to toddles:

Sounds nice! Thanks

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In reply to Blue Straggler:

Un Coeur en Hiver (Claude Sautet, 1992)

French tale of deliberate repression of love which makes The Remains of the Day look like a Sandra Bullock rom-com. 

Great stuff. 

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 toddles 12 Sep 2020
In reply to Blue Straggler:

I watched Flawless on Netflix the other night, it's like Robert de Niro meets Ru Paul's drag race.

It's from 1999 so might be a bit non pc in today's terms but it is funny.

Robert de Niro plays a retired homophobic, hero cop living in the same  apartment building as Philip Seymour Hoffman who plays a drag queen singer called Rusty.

The hate each other at first but gradually become friends, singing lessons bring them together.

Puzzle on Netflix is quite watchable, it's about a woman who has a rather unfulfilled life, cooking and cleaning for her husband and two adult sons.

She gets a 1000 piece jigsaw as a birthday present and finds she is exceptionally quick at doing them.

This begins to open up opportunities for her to start to assert herself and change her life.

Bit slow moving at times but it's thought provoking.

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In reply to Blue Straggler:

The Devil All The Time.

I read Pollock's "The Heavenly Table"  last year and really enjoyed it . I haven't read this, his debut novel, so I didn't know what to expect . Overall it has the makings of a good film but seems to lack cohesion. One critic says it would nave beenn better as a mini series and I can see that.

Good performances all round, though, lovely to look at and listen to: I particularly like the device of using the author as narrator and am wonderring now which other film adaptations would ( or would not) benefit from this treatment.

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 Offwidth 09:41 Sun
In reply to Tom V:

I re-watched  Casablanca yesterday. After a but of a silly start I still think it justifies its classic status. My main reason for raising it here is I accidentally turned the subtitles on and noticed a problem so left them on.  They were plain terrible... butchering the screen dialogue and I wonder how the deaf who lip read and the partially deaf would deal with this. Has anyone else noticed such shoddy treatment of a major film.

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In reply to Offwidth:

Have you noticed that Sofia Helin is back on Saturday night BBC4 but not as Saga Noren? ( Not strictly a film comment but it's the third spin off from the original Mystery Road film, I think. All very confusing)

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 Offwidth 11:44 Sun
In reply to Tom V:

Set to record

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In reply to Blue Straggler:

Tenet: sixis/10

I thought someone else would have reviewed this by now, but I guess a lot of people are still avoiding the cinema. I was a little reluctant to write it up because I prefer to be positive and I'm a big fan of a lot of Nolan's work, but I don't think this is up there with his best. It's undoubtedly visually spectacular and conceptually ambitious. A fairly deadpan John David Washington stars as The Protagonist, who works for a mysterious agency attempting to combat attacks from the future with weapons capable of reversing the flow of time: guns suck bullets out of walls, fist fights go simultaneously backwards and forwards, attack squads execute temporal pincer movements from different points in the time stream. Hence the palindromic title. The simultaneously opposing time streams do produce some excellent actions scenes, but also make for an ultimately rather tangled narrative. The Protagonist goes out of his way to rescue the wife (Elizabeth Debicki)  of Kenneth Branagh's megalomaniac villain, which makes for exciting plot development, but without any motivation I found particularly convincing.

We watched the reissue of Inception the previous week, and in my view that's a much better movie. Having said that, Tenet has divided the critics and it's certainly worth seeing to make your own mind up. Either way, I do think Nolan is to be admired for putting out this visually striking megabudget blockbuster now, and so doing his bit to get people back into the cinema in such difficult times. Bond franchise take note.

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