/ Last Year in Marienbad

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Blue Straggler 28 Sep 2019

Is this film basically just a bloke spending an hour and half trying to get a woman to sleep with him on the basis that he (unlike her) is sure he met her a year ago?

Or have I missed some major allegory? 

Bob Kemp 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

I think it's supposed to be a mystery, and if there's any allegory it's that in the end making sense of our lives is a bit of a mystery, one which we can never solve. (To be interpreted in the context of French existentialism, black polo-necks, cafes, coffee and Gauloise smoke.)

Blue Straggler 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Bob Kemp:

I watched in a cool independent cinema in Portland, Oregon (the hipster/black-turtleneck/Gauloises/thick-rimmed-glasses capital of the USA) whilst drinking expensive Oregon craft beer and wearing a surplus discounted t shirt marking the cinema’s earlier screening of a 7.5 hour edit of Bondarchuk’s 1968 War and Peace 

Bob Kemp 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Prime conditions for liking it then... What went wrong?

Blue Straggler 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Bob Kemp:

I didn’t say I didn’t like it! I was just wondering if I “got it”! 

Bob Kemp 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Ah, I see... your original post hinted at disappointment. I suspect if you're mystified you probably got it.  

If you look at the reviews, then and now, some people thought it was a load of cobblers whilst some, more so now it seems, thought it was a masterpiece. I take the superficial approach - it does look fantastic!

Mick Ward 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

I remember watching it in either Bradford or Sheffield film theatres (both superb venues, with great films, both closed down!)

As we trooped out, a lady behind me exclaimed, "My God, it was wonderful - absolutely wonderful! But... what did it mean?"

As Tallulah Bankhead once opined, "There's less to this than meets the eye."

Mick

BnB 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

The original writer of the film, Alain Robbe Grillet, the most eminent exponent of the Nouveau Roman* movement, does not intend that the spectator leaves with a firm view. He observed of the viewer's experience and his own intentions: "Two attitudes are then possible: either the spectator will try to reconstitute some 'Cartesian' scheme – the most linear, the most rational he can devise – and this spectator will certainly find the film difficult if not incomprehensible; or else the spectator will let himself be carried along by the extraordinary images in front of him [...] and to this spectator, the film will seem the easiest he has ever seen: a film addressed exclusively to his sensibility, to his faculties of sight, hearing, feeling."

In other words you can fight to construct a logic that will continually elude you. Or sit back and enjoy. The choice is yours.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nouveau_roman

Blue Straggler 30 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

The woman was hot and the man was handsome 

Bob Kemp 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Good to see you're  with me in the 'superficial' camp!

Blue Straggler 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Mick Ward:

> As we trooped out, a lady behind me exclaimed, "My God, it was wonderful - absolutely wonderful! But... what did it mean?"

> As Tallulah Bankhead once opined, "There's less to this than meets the eye."

Tallulah Ok with the bons mots but Sheffield/Bradford lady is understandable, you can apply that to a lot of films. David Lynch’s Lost Highway is the example that springs to my mind right now 

Mick Ward 01 Oct 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

I simply found her response hilarious!

She probably made professor of media studies by the mid 1990s. Then the honours list by the early 2000s. Then the charity commission...

Cynical - moi?

Mick

Stichtplate 01 Oct 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

> Or have I missed some major allegory? 

French bloke sees beautiful unaccompanied woman. Gives it the old "excuse me, don't I know you from somewhere?" (hackneyed even in 1960). Relentlessly pursues the same line hoping to wear her down through sheer persistence.

No allegory, it's basically a documentary. 


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.