/ Acclimatisation profiles for standard treks at altitude

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JohnV - on 23 Aug 2017
Is there a medically approved "safe"acclimatisation profile published anywhere? Something which trekking companies adhere to for standard popular climbs / treks at altitude such as Everest Base Camp, Kili, Kinabalu etc.? I am after some evidence to support a 3 night ascent profile of 0m - 2700m - 3300m as being within what would generally be seen as acceptable in terms of safe ascent rates.
Thanks in advance!
kmhphoto - on 23 Aug 2017
JohnV - on 24 Aug 2017
In reply to kmhphoto:

Superb, just the ticket, thanks.
splat2million on 24 Aug 2017
In reply to JohnV:
The Wilderness Medicine Society recommends that once above 3000m, you should stick to a maximum ascent of 500m per day, with a rest day (no ascent) every 3-4 days or 1000m.
You can climb higher each day (including the rest day) but should sleep no higher than this.
This is "safe" for most people - some people will still get AMS, especially if other factors are involved (stomach bugs, colds, strenuous activity, etc.)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20591379

What trekking companies actually do is not necessarily in line with this, for example a 5-day ascent of the Coca-Cola route on Kilimanjaro is much faster (and causes very high rates of serious altitude-related illness).

0m - 2700m - 3300m would probably be an acceptable ascent profile. Altitude can be unpredictable and still cause problems on "safe" ascent profiles, so a bit of common sense is still necessary.
Post edited at 01:06

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