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Please help out some uni students with a climbing project if you can!

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 joecmorris 15 Nov 2022

Please help out some uni students with a climbing project if you can by answering a few quick multiple choice questions!

https://forms.office.com/r/YRejJUMCbn

1
In reply to joecmorris:

Sounds like you are looking at a working on a rope inspection device.

Climbers may not be the best target market, working at height industry could well be more interested. They have requirements for scheduled inspection and tracking of ropes, even a small outfit might have kilometres worth of rope to inspect, its tedious to do by hand.  

best of luck

 Basemetal 15 Nov 2022
In reply to joecmorris:

Completed. Couple of problem questions though...

"Q6.How concerned are you about the condition of your rope(s)? (1 = not at all concerned, 5 = extremely concerned)"

The ambiguity of 'concerned' here could give you a nonsense range of answers. Do you mean worried about my present rope's condition; or 'do I take my rope(s)' condition seriously, even though I know it to be good"?

And Q7

"Q7.How often do you change your rope?

Weekly/Monthly/Seasonal/Yearly/Never"

My answer would be around 10 years use (some manufacturers' recommendations) for normal wear, barring any incidental damage. 

 Cobra_Head 15 Nov 2022
In reply to joecmorris:

People sort of inspect their rope on every use, at least if you have your wits about you.

Not a full on inspection but, most people would notice a lump, cut or void while either coiling or feeding out.

 jkarran 15 Nov 2022
In reply to joecmorris:

Sorry to be blunt but the survey is garbage. If you're actually interested in capturing how rock climbers use and think about their ropes I'd pull it and have another go.

There's a huge gap between yearly and never whereas nobody replaces or fully inspects their personal kit weekly.

What exactly does "concerned about my rope" mean? "Do you worry about the condition of your rope?" would capture how I feel more generally about my rope, my 'concern' could be justified or not, by its actual condition and history.

When I get rid of a rope I could be near certain it's safe because I'm still happy using it on the day I decide but it's tired, time for a new one. Or I can be near certain it's unsafe because it came out of a pool of battery acid. I've done both, it's about the individual rope, not me.

What is expensive or not changes fast with personal financial circumstances, the value of the thing less so.

The when do you dispose of a rope question would probably capture more information if it were open or a multi-tick option with an open 'other' line. 'After a personal decision' covers all three options anyway!

Out of curiosity though, what's your course/background? What would assisted/automated NDT of a climbing rope even entail, AI visual assessment, mechanical stress-strain analysis, some sort of spectroscopic chemical analysis? It's pretty hard to beat running a rope through your hands, especially since we do it every time it's used, they're incredibly sensitive.

jk

Post edited at 16:24
1
 mrjonathanr 15 Nov 2022
In reply to Basemetal:

> "Q7.How often do you change your rope?

> My answer would be around 10 years use (some manufacturers' recommendations) 

Which ones recommend retiring after 10 years of use? Thanks,

 Basemetal 16 Nov 2022
In reply to mrjonathanr:

Good summary here: https://blog.weighmyrack.com/lifespan-of-a-climbing-rope-when-to-retire/

My answer based on how I use my ropes, not a blanket recommendation.

 mrjonathanr 16 Nov 2022
In reply to Basemetal:

Thanks, good article.  That graphic is good, summarises what I have always thought/ been taught, although in practice, there's a good margin of safety in those recommendations.

No manufacturers I know of recommend using ropes regularly for up to 10 years; 7 is the standard limit for ropes in occasional use.

The 10 year recommended limit is due to inherent decline of strength in nylon strength over the period. ie unused, in packaging, but 10 years old = in the bin. Although as said, they may well be serviceable for longer, but ... your call.

 Brass Nipples 16 Nov 2022
In reply to Basemetal:

Ha, time to retire some of my older ropes.


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