/ never climb again ?

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Amroly-Poly 17 Sep 2019

have managed to rip the ligament of my big toe (off the bone) so cant really bend my toe i have had 3 months of climbing and a course of steroid injections etc, doctors say i wont be able to climb again as i cant put any weight on it, but has anyone in the community had know of similar situations and people making a recovery.

thinking of rolling the dice and getting some stem cells/ PRP treatment anyone know anything about these aswell

best wishes

In reply to Amroly-Poly:

Of course you will. Lower grades and using the outside edge of that foot more, maybe, but so what? 

Doctors just say this stuff for motivational purposes, I reckon.

jcm

mff513 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

Maybe a pair of flat shoes and a splint might help ie taping it to your other toe

Dave Cundy 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

In these days of miraculous recoveries from ACL ruptures, I wonder if they are simply fobbing you off in order to ease pressure on underfunded waiting lists. 

I'd suggest a consultation with a private surgeon.  They might be optimistic (cos they want your money) but it might provide some balance to the doctors you've seen so far.

Happy hunting.

EdS 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

People learn to walk and climb again following big toe amputation so of course you will

James Oakes 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

I have torn a collateral ligament in my finger (not fully off the bone though I think). I have been having shockwave treatment at the physio and I am cautiously optimistic that it is helping. Not sure if it will be useful in your case but may be worth looking into.

pass and peak 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

Reinhold Messner lost 6 toes on Nanga Parbat, still seamed to do OK after that!

summo 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

It's far more likely you will rather than won't climb again in the future. But in the meantime broaden your sports to what you can do now. They'll keep you occupied, plus maintain strength and fitness etc. 

Iamgregp 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

Everybody told Tommy Caldwell he was done as a climber when he lost a finger.  

Do what it takes but you can overcome this.

Dan Arkle 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

Never climb again sounds too dramatic - you almost certainly will if you want to enough. 

However this one might take a while - it could be a great time to get into sea kayaking, road biking, gravel bike touring etc.

All of these can give excellent adventures while being kind on the feet. 

cb294 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

I am not a medic but a biologists working in a stem cell intistute. From my POV I would forget stem cell treatments. With very few notable exceptions (hematopoietic system / bone marrow transplants and bone reconstruction for gaps in long bones or worn out hip prostheses) they are still highly experimental. This is also true for using stem cells as anti-inflammation reagents, e.g. when co-infusing mesenchymal stem cells for suppression of acute graft versus host disease. Anything on offer for fixing a torn tendon is a criminal rip off at best. 

Let the toe heal as good as it goes, and rather spend money on custom made shoes or insoles that help spread the load. As others have said, many climbers have continues after toe amputations. 

CB

nuts and bolts 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

I am certain that you will climb again . Never underestimate the healing powers of the body. In your position I would probably get the opinion of a podiatrist for a more specialised opinion than that of a GP (the clue is in the name - "general" practitioner). Hope you get back climbing as soon as possible.

Bob Kemp 18 Sep 2019
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

I think doctors also try to manage expectations, and to get people to take one step at a time. I asked about climbing again after smashing my pelvis and was told 'I'd concentrate on whether you'll walk again first.' 

Martin Haworth 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

Give it time to heal and see how well you can function. If it’s still a problem to climb then either accept climbing at a reduced level or get it amputated or fused.

Most doctors don’t really understand climbing/climbers.

JamieA 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

My 80 year old dad's got a fused ankle and big toe, and he still leads VS.

Good luck with it!

Amroly-Poly 18 Sep 2019
In reply to JamieA:

good man

Alkis 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

Cheque has done 7a a year after smashing pretty much the entirety of his body to bits, so I’m sure you’ll climb again.

im off 18 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

Not sure which joint you're on about exactly but could joint fusion arthrodesis sort it out. Common to have this done for bunions. If it gives you enough on going probs maybe nhs will do?

Neil Williams 18 Sep 2019
In reply to EdS:

> People learn to walk and climb again following big toe amputation so of course you will


People learn to walk (with a prosthetic) and climb again following the amputation of their entire leg.

It's understandable that you feel as you do - an injury is never good - but you'll get there in some form.

Post edited at 17:24
Capricorn One 19 Sep 2019
In reply to Amroly-Poly:

I broke my ankle a couple of years ago and as a result of the injury I couldn't bend my left big toe (different to your situation, my tendon was effectively shortened, but still attached). I started climbing inside again, but wearing mountain boots. Clumsy, but an effective way of getting back in to climbing. (I since had an op to lengthen the tendon and have some movement back, so I'm back in rock shoes and climbing just below my pre-accident level.) I obviously don't know the details in your case but presumably the tendon can be reattached? Then hopefully it's just physio, patience and time. Best of luck!


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