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Which waterproof/tough camera

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 andrew549 17 Nov 2020

I'm looking at buying a waterproof camera for use when canoeing and climbing. Ideally something fairly simple to use as will often be used whilst wearing gloves and probably spend a fair amount of time living in my buoyancy aid and.

The Olympus TG6 seems to be top lots of reviews so was looking for peoples experience and what other options are worth looking at.

Thanks

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In reply to andrew549:

I'm on my third TG camera (upgrades, not damage). Use it for caving, kayaking and winter or wet climbing. The TG5 that I have does Raw as well as jpeg. The lens is a little soft in some situations but I've done several A3+ prints which have been of excellent quality. The only thing to watch, if you keep it in a pouch, is that the exposure compensation dial can turn without you noticing so you need to check it hasn't before taking that first picture. They have a reputation for having an easily scratched screen but a protector soon sorts that and you can get a cheapish lens cap from Amazon that fits in place of the accessory ring to protect the lens with a UV filter. I won't be ungrading to the TG6 as it doesn't differ that much from the 5 so you might find some 5's at a good price.

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 ring ouzel 17 Nov 2020
In reply to andrew549:

I also have the TG5. Cracking wee camera. I got it to photograph moths in my trap as it focuses down to 1cm. It produces really nice images. As its waterproof I've also taken it sea kayaking, snorkelling and on my SUP.

Its a nice size so you can always have it on you. 

Recommended!

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 kevin stephens 17 Nov 2020
In reply to andrew549:

TG series are excellent as fully waterproof cameras. I use My TG4 for sea kayaking. It’s not as good as many compacts with bigger sensors and better lenses for climbing, particularly in difficult lighting conditions, but adequate 

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 andrew549 18 Nov 2020

Thanks for the replies, looks like the TG cameras are the popular option so will start having a look for one.  Fortunately I've got an older fujifilm X-T10 for good weather climbing and walking photos so only really after it for wet weather use and canoeing.

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 jmerrick21 18 Nov 2020
In reply to andrew549:

I've just picked up the canon ivy rec. It was a bit of a gamble but it's tuning out to be a fairly useful little tough, waterproof camera. Picture quality is no better than a phone but I plan to just leave it clipped to my harness/rucksack/canoe. 

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 craig h 19 Nov 2020
In reply to andrew549:

I often get asked to chose robust waterproof, shock proof cameras for work (Rope access both on and offshore) as well as using a few myself outdoors over the years.

The Olympus range has always come out top for overall performance and image quality even in a low light environment. We are still using some TG5's, but researched and bought some replacements this year. As we don't need all the functions Olympus cameras offer the alternative we have been trialling for the last couple of months is the RICOH WG-70. I've used older RICOH industrial shock proof cameras in the past and we did trial an off the shelf RICOH about 6 years ago and was not impressed with any of them. 1 came out the box broken and we killed the other 2 within a couple of weeks. Same with the Nikon, Panasonic and FugiFilm Toughs (either broke quickly or the image quality was poor).

The RICOH WG-70's we currently have are not that great, poor performance in low light, screen and lens easily scratched and hatches to the battery and cable ports seem a bit flimsy.

I'm not sure how much better the Olympus TG6 is over the TG5, but seems some nice features like an integral flash ring for macro shots. I have always been impressed with the Olympus Tough range for work and play and not found anything that comes close for robustness and photo quality. 

Post edited at 04:32
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 oliwarlow 20 Nov 2020
In reply to andrew549:

Looks like you have some good advice on what takes the best pictures and is durable.  One thing that is a factor for me is ensuring I have my camera at hand in those epic situations, this normally means on a sling or clipped somewhere handy (I.e. can get to with one hand whilst clinging on for dear life with the other hand) which also puts it as risk of getting smashed.  The more expensive the camera for me the less likely it is going to be kept in that situation, I have a £100 tough lumix (very light too ) which fits this job for me.  Pictures ok for capturing the moment but not going to win any awards.  Totally personal choice though, I just thought I would through that out there as another option rather than spending 3-4x that on something you might then be worried about breaking 

o.

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 Steve Woollard 20 Nov 2020
In reply to andrew549:

I've got a TG3. A few years ago I dropped a 100m down the route and I found it at the bottom of the cliff a bit scratched and some trim missing but still working fine.

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