UKH

Photographing Slides

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 Chris Craggs Global Crag Moderator  UKH Supporter 18 May 2021

I know there are regular threads about scanning old slides, but in experimental mode I tried photographing a few today - I did it outside in full sunshine, holding the slides in front of an illuminated sheet of white papers and using the camera's 'close-up' mode. I thought the results and the system might be of interest. A basic improvement would be to clean the slides before I started, the sun highlights the dust!

Chris

Post edited at 15:34

 Andy Manthorpe 18 May 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Those have come out surprisingly well.

 SouthernSteve 18 May 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

They have done very well. Have you done much photoshopping or is this raw?

 Myfyr Tomos 18 May 2021
In reply to SouthernSteve:

Very impressed. I'm a fan of low-tech.

 Chris Craggs Global Crag Moderator  UKH Supporter 18 May 2021
In reply to SouthernSteve:

> They have done very well. Have you done much photoshopping or is this raw?


I have used Photoshop to straighten them and trim the edges, the originals only fill about half the frame - I may experiment with using the zoom end of the lens in but I will probably need someone else to hold the slides,

Chris

 HeMa 18 May 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

There actually used to be a slide adapter you could screw on the filter threads of a close focus macro lens (might have required some extenders in between).

But those do indeed look really good.

In reply to Chris Craggs:

Astonishingly good - the flat bed scanner I was using until it blew a tube in the backlight (I think) would not have done so well. And nor would the Nikon Coolscan I used at the turn of the century - it was so slow that you could die of boredom. 

 SouthernSteve 18 May 2021
In reply to pneame:

I remember long evenings with the Coolscan for work - a film took about 90 minutes and I suspect here, higher pixel count and much wider dynamic range and perhaps matrix metering are all having good effects and a better output.

 Andy Kassyk 19 May 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Hi

What camera and lens? What was the set up - distance from lens to slide?  

I have a pile of slides going back to the late 70s that I'd like to digitise at some point. I quite liek the idea of a "reverse" slide projector.   

Thanks

I scan slides by using a 100mm macro lens, a Canon DSLR and a lightbox with a vertical camera mounting. Way faster than a slide scanner and sufficiently good quality.

 SouthernSteve 19 May 2021
In reply to David Barlow:

Nikon used to make a slide copier (Slide copyer ES-1) that looked appealing although the number of compatible lenses was small from memory.

 Chris Craggs Global Crag Moderator  UKH Supporter 19 May 2021
In reply to Andy Kassyk:

Sony RX10 - the lens is 24-600. I have it at 24mm and the slides maybe 5cm from the front of the lens.

Chris

 Fraser 19 May 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Those look really good! Just so I understand the set up,  did you use the reflected sunlight off the paper to act like a light-box, back-lighting the slides, or am I misunderstanding the technique?

 Chris Craggs Global Crag Moderator  UKH Supporter 19 May 2021
In reply to Fraser:

Yes, sun shining on a piece of A4 and the slide held in-front of it at an angle - quite a bit of fiddling to get everything right, but still quicker than scanning. I suspect the bright sunlight is the key,

Chris

 Fraser 20 May 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Thanks for clarifying. I recently came across a load of old family slides I'd like to digitize and this sounds like a good way to do so efficiently. I might set up a basic cardboard jig to hold the slides in place to speed up the process.

In reply to Chris Craggs:

That is really impressive. Did you have some sort of slot to put the slides in. Autofocus?

 nikkormat 20 May 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Nikon make the ES-2 film copy adapter. It's designed to work with a couple of their macro lenses, but with the help of extension rings and adapters it can be made to work with other macro lenses.

The method I use at the moment is to place the negative or slide on a light box. If you do not have a light box, you can get a light panel app for a phone/tablet. Camera on a tripod, and I use a bullseye spirit level to get the camera back and the film parallel. Holding the film flat is the difficult bit.

Lomography make a frame called a DigitaLIZA, intended for scanning, which can be used to hold the film flat. There are other frame designs, too; the Pixl-latr looks good: https://www.pixl-latr.com/

 Chris Craggs Global Crag Moderator  UKH Supporter 20 May 2021
In reply to Robert Durran:

Hand-held, auto-focus, and a bit of fiddling. The unedited shot + final versions below.

Chris

Post edited at 09:45

 Baz P 31 May 2021
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Just to get a digital record of several hundred slides, some of which were discoloured, I photographed them on the screen as they were running through the projector. Took about 5 seconds per shot. Not perfect but I've not looked at them for 15 years.


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