UKH

Lee filters

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 jethro kiernan 20 Oct 2017
Any one use lee filters, I have been using a Cokin Z pro filter system but intend to swap for a Lee system mainly because of the wide angle adaptor but also I'd like to use some better quality filters
What's the UKC experience
 Jon Read 21 Oct 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

Have used them for years, they are very well made (British made, a rarity) and will serve you well. I made the commitment to Lee system early on and have never regretted it. You can get good 2nd hand adaptors and holders from Ffordes, but the ND grads (if that's what you're after) are harder to find 2nd hand.
 Brian 21 Oct 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan: I have used them for years as well, solid kit and they now have reverse ND grads which are really handy

 jethro kiernan 21 Oct 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

I presume the Lee system will work with my existing cokin filters (100mm)
I have a Lee big stopper that I use already in the z pro system
 Jon Read 21 Oct 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

yes, they'll take any 100mm filter, unless it's really very thick.
 chrisprescott 21 Oct 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

Starting with a bit of disclaimer as i'm supported by LEE Filters but that aside I think they're great, I use them extensively for shooting landscape but also high contrast climbing/ biking/ skiing shots. A lot of the images here were taken using LEE - http://www.darksky-media.com/
In reply to jethro kiernan:

I always used the Lee system on my Hasselblad, with the Lee lens hood, for tripod situations. Very good and well made. On hand-held shoots, I'd go with the smaller, removable Hasselblad lens hoods for each lens. I very rarely used fancy filters beyond 81a & b and the polarizer, apart from three different grades of ND graduated filter for some landscape shots. Very early on I rejected coloured grads.
 jethro kiernan 21 Oct 2017
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Cheers
I will mainly be using a selection of nd grads and a lee big and little stopper, the polariser I will have to save up for :-/ I'm using a screw on 77mm at the moment.
 jethro kiernan 21 Oct 2017
In reply to chrisprescott:

Great website Chris
 Adam Long 23 Oct 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

I've had them for a few years, glad I got in before they jacked the prices up. I guess they couldn't keep up with the demand. The new reverse grads look great but are £150!!

I think the Heliopan polariser is a better option than the Lee - much slimmer and a bit cheaper. Edit, may be out of date here: http://richdysonphotography.com/2014/11/the-lee-landscape-polariser-v-heliopan-slim-circular-polaris...

Make sure you buy a proper pouch and triple-wrap etc. At the price you can't afford to scratch them.
 jethro kiernan 23 Oct 2017
In reply to Adam Long:

ive already got a decent pouch, the lee big stopper is always a bit of a worry being glass :-/

at the moment i'm using a circular screw in polarizer but will try and stretch to a lee one in the future.
The reverse grads look pretty cool especially for sea scapes
 jethro kiernan 25 Oct 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

Thanks for the help, will be ordering the wide angle adaptor and a little stopper starter kit on payday :-/
 jethro kiernan 03 Nov 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

Cheers everybody
Got the Lee set and much prefer the handling and ease of use over the Cokin and no vignetting
 Big Ger 03 Nov 2017
In reply to chrisprescott:

Very impressive stuff mate.
 kevin stephens 04 Nov 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

Reading this I've resurrected by Cokin P series holder and graduated ND whuch I bought in the days of 35mm film and got a new adaptor ring to fit my prime lenses.
I appreciate Lee filters are probably a lot better but also a lot more expensive. For now I'm going to work with and get used to my Cokin system which gives me a low cost route to learning how to get the most out of Filters leaving the option of upgrading to Lee if it becomes worth it for me.

What would you recommend as a basic set of filters (in addition to ND grad) for climbing and mountain photography for use on a DSLR?
 jethro kiernan 04 Nov 2017
In reply to kevin stephens:

For landscapes a ND for slowing down the exposure for that moving water look, you can go for a 10 stop for daylight to a 3 stop for dawn dusk
It's a nice effect but pretty overused at the moment.
A polariser is pretty useful, ones to fit a filter holder are pretty expensively, I use a 77mm screw on that fits both my most used landscape lenses which is a cheaper option.
Amazon is a pretty good source for cheap filters, it will allow you to experiment before you commit to a more expensive option
 Fraser 04 Nov 2017
In reply to kevin stephens:

> What would you recommend as a basic set of filters (in addition to ND grad) for climbing and mountain photography for use on a DSLR?

Kind of same recommendations as jk above. The Cokin P filters I got were the 0.3 ND grad. soft and hard and the 0.6 soft. I also got a cheapo 10-stop filter by some other company I'd never heard of:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00DHH42HK/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's ok, but I rarely use it due to a noticeable colour cast and slight vignetting for some reason.

 kevin stephens 04 Nov 2017
In reply to jethro Kiernan and Fraser:
Thanks

 chrisprescott 04 Nov 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

I'd definitely recommend keeping the Big Stopper in the tin it comes in, I've broken 3 over the past couple of years! (Although that's more an indication of how little I look after my gear and not the build quality!)
 jethro kiernan 04 Nov 2017
In reply to chrisprescott:

Yes, it's almost inevitable I keep it in the tin but I tend not to pamper my gear

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