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Camera for Climbing and General Use

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I have a now ageing Canon 450D DSLR for general use and I also have an Olympus TG-5 which I take on routes. However, the results I get from the Olympus are poor, the pictures have a lot of noise, the flare is awful and I find it hard to control focus and the aperture in A mode, so I often get blurred pictures when I shouldn't.

I would like one camera that I can use both for climbing and other photography (mainly landscapes). I am wondering if a mirrorless camera would be a good compromise? Ideally it would need to be compact and light enough to take on a climb, with weather sealing, and a good system of interchangeable lenses so that I can take a compact lens on routes and use other lenses for landscapes etc when I am not climbing.

Until recently I had been considering upgrading to a used 80D for my general use camera, but I doubt I would want to take it on routes, even if I got a pancake lens for it. I am somewhat invested in Canon lenses, so would like to stick with Canon if possible.

I do mostly single pitch routes, but I would want to take my camera on multi-pitch routes too.

Can I have my cake and eat it?

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In reply to Rob Jarratt:

Olympus OMD -EM-5 mk II//III

😏

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 The Lemming 15:17 Sun
In reply to Rob Jarratt:

Do you want to go full frame or micro four thirds?

I went micro four thirds because the cameras and glass were smaller, lighter and arguably just as good image wise.

At the moment, Sony are the brand to consider first and then work your way from there.

I'm a Panasonic fanboy.

Post edited at 15:18
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 redjerry 15:46 Sun
In reply to Rob Jarratt:

I got the Canon Full-frame mirrorless (EOSR). It's a great camera for stills and IMO a big step up from the 80D. Far too big to take on routes though.

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In reply to The Lemming:

Can't say I had ever considered the micro four thirds format before. I don't know a lot about this format as I have not been keeping myself informed about the progress of camera technology. I had always wanted to get back to full frame from the 35mm film camera days and using APS-C already felt like I was compromising, purely because of the expense of full frame DSLRs. But given my desire to have something small and light that can still serve as my main non-climbing camera too, then perhaps that is the change I should make and consider other formats.

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 The Lemming 16:27 Sun
In reply to Rob Jarratt:

Unless you enjoy pixel peeping, or if you are a professional who's clients demand the best then I bet you could not tell the difference between ff and m43 images viewed side by side.

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In reply to The Lemming:

Definitely not a pro!

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 The Lemming 20:34 Sun
In reply to kevin stephens:

> I'm not convinced by mirrorless, but it's a great marketing ruse getting people to ditch their perfectly good DSLR systems and buy a new set of lenses.

> Image quality of modern APS-C or Micro 4/3 cameras is so good that full frame seems pointless unless you make your living from selling very large prints.

My brain hurts over these two statements.

However the marketing fashion/trend at the moment, especially in vlogging YouTubeLand is for full frame mirrorless cameras. I believe that camera companies want to sell more cameras with the emphasis on full frame cameras at the moment because full frame sounds more sexy that micro something or other. And, where possible sell new glass to go with those cameras. Lets not beat around the bush, such cameras are power-houses. Even the prosumer full frame Panasonic S1, is on the list of cameras allowed by Amazon to film blockbuster Box Sets.

But the physics problem is still there, full frame cameras demand big expensive full frame lenses.

If the OP want's to jump down the rabbit hole of micro four thirds cameras then this discussion may prove interesting.

https://www.ukhillwalking.com/forums/photography/camera_upgrade_but_which_system-723750

I still stick by the recommendation of putting Sony at the top of the list and then check out who can compete with them.

And I'm seriously thinking of this bad boy if I don't want to take my big camera out to play

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGRMOXCE9TQ&

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DNsaSaEKMc&t=18s

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In reply to The Lemming:

Well I guess neither the OP nor me are interested in making motion pictures

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 The Lemming 23:36 Sun
In reply to kevin stephens:

> Well I guess neither the OP nor me are interested in making motion pictures


I'm interested in taking stills, always have and always will. I was just confused by you starting off saying you were not convinced by mirrorless and then saying that for most people that they were as good as each other.

I still maintain that a Sony camera should be at the top of anybody's shopping list and way ahead of Canon or Nikon on that list.

Post edited at 23:36
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In reply to kevin stephens:

I see video as nice to have, but far from essential.

Thanks for all the replies so far, I have some reading and thinking to do. I can't say I am super keen on formats even smaller than APS-C, but perhaps that is the compromise I would have to make.

I could stick with two cameras, as I do now, but I would really want to replace the TG-5. I struggle with the concept of compact digital cameras (like the suggested Ricoh GR III) that cost more than some DSLRs and have a fixed focal length lens. Although I am sure they must produce very good images. I would want a compact for routes to have at least some weather sealing, it doesn't seem like the Ricoh does from what I can see.

Re the suggestion for Sony, these are full frame cameras aren't they? Presumably far too big and heavy to climb with on a route, surely?

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 The Lemming 00:42 Mon
In reply to Rob Jarratt:

Sony do different sized sensors.

Have a look at a Panasonic gx85. It may very well tick both boxes of main camera and climbing camera.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDt4YMcrsuU&

Its also weather sealed. Olympus also make outstanding m43 cameras

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In reply to Rob Jarratt:

>... and using APS-C already felt like I was compromising, purely because of the expense of full frame DSLRs. 

The Landscape Photographer of the Year has just been won by a bloke shooting a Nikon D7500 APS-C camera, so the compromise can't be so bad there? 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/oct/19/landscape-photographer-of-the-year-2020-in-pictures

... I now use a Panasonic LX100 II Micro Four Thirds camera, for when I want something very compact and lightweight when I'm out walking/climbing/cycling. It produces great images that are barely discernibly any different from my more expensive kit:

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonic-dc-lx100-ii

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In reply to Rob Jarratt:

Did you consider using a aps-c mirrorless M-series Canon with the lenses you already have via an adaptor. I doubt the adaptor would cause you any issues for the applications you mentioned.

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 The Lemming 18:18 Mon
In reply to Rob Jarratt:

Here is an explanation of M43 cameras.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m072i-jDSg4&

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 timparkin 18:31 Mon
In reply to The Lemming:

> Sony do different sized sensors.

> Have a look at a Panasonic gx85. It may very well tick both boxes of main camera and climbing camera.

> Its also weather sealed. Olympus also make outstanding m43 cameras

The GX85 isn't weather sealed (not like the GX8 and others) 

https://www.tomsguide.com/us/panasonic-lumix-gx85,review-3511.html

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 The Lemming 20:06 Mon
In reply to timparkin:

Sorry it's the g80

Very similar spec to gx80

Post edited at 20:07
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