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Vizslas?

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020

Anyone got one? Recommend the breed? Recommend a breeder?

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 Agar Jelly 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

For a moment Stitch, I thought you were having a poke at them face visors that peel off from the sponge mount like a damp cigarette paper at the most inopportune moments.

Good luck finding a friendly canine companion fella.

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to Agar Jelly:

Apparently they’re the World’s most affectionate dog breed. Don’t know why but I kinda feel I’m missing a little unconditional love at the moment 😁

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In reply to Stichtplate:

I wouldn't have a new dog at the moment as introducing it to the world as it is at the moment is going to bring about all kinds of problems with socialising and using public transport, etc.

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 SouthernSteve 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

> Apparently they’re the World’s most affectionate dog breed

advertising spin!

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to FactorXXX:

> I wouldn't have a new dog at the moment as introducing it to the world as it is at the moment is going to bring about all kinds of problems with socialising and using public transport, etc.

Waiting lists of around 12 months for reputable breeders. Just after a bit of a steer really

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 Blue Straggler 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

No advice from me about breeders etc but an unscientific anecdotal observation from me would be that every Viszla owner I've met (approximately three in the UK) has been a) really full of themselves generally and b) really full-on about Viszlas (and the high maintenance aspect of them) to the point where I began to wonder if they had much else going in their lives  

YMMV

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to Blue Straggler:

> No advice from me about breeders etc but an unscientific anecdotal observation from me would be that every Viszla owner I've met (approximately three in the UK) has been a) really full of themselves generally and b) really full-on about Viszlas (and the high maintenance aspect of them) to the point where I began to wonder if they had much else going in their lives  

> YMMV

Super Awesome! Sounds like I’ve picked a winner!

Edit: seriously, you know 3 Vizsla owners socially? I’ve only come across two walking their dogs. My main dog specifications were a pointer, family friendly, likes lots of exercise and a bit smaller than a Doberman.

Post edited at 13:52
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 gravy 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

They have a tendency to separation anxiety so only suit some lifestyles.  Also they don't really understand "up" and a climbing couple I knew had to deal with the dog feeling it was abandoned every time they left the ground despite being in plain view to the rest of us.

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 petemeads 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

The Countryfile presenter-farmer Adam Henson has a couple of them, one smooth and one hairy, as pets rather than as working dogs. He seems to think they are great, the ones I have met have all impressed me.

Good luck getting hold of one!

Post edited at 13:57
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 Blue Straggler 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

No, I've MET three! Over the decades. For a multitude of reasons, I don't KNOW these people any more. Make of that what you will

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to Blue Straggler:

> No, I've MET three! Over the decades. For a multitude of reasons, I don't KNOW these people any more. Make of that what you will

Fair do, but from your somewhat 'spiky' posting style (pot kettle black?) I suspect it doesn't take a lot to get crossed off your Christmas card list.

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 Agar Jelly 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

Sometimes it can take me weeks to realise Blue's taken the p*ss

It cuts deep

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 marsbar 21 May 2020
In reply to FactorXXX:

I don't think I ever took mine on public transport.  I guess it depends where you live. We did go in a steam train once which was fine.  

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to marsbar:

> I don't think I ever took mine on public transport.  I guess it depends where you live. We did go in a steam train once which was fine.  

You had a Vizsla! That has totally reassured me after Blue’s earlier comment. Would you recommend them though?

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 deepsoup 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

> Recommend a breeder?

I know nothing about dogs really, or breeders.  But when did complete ignorance of the subject ever stop anyone from offering advice around here?  With that in mind, would it be out of order to recommend that you have nothing to do with a breeder and adopt a rescue dog instead?

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 marsbar 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

They look like lovely dogs.  There are a couple of breed specific rescues that you could look at.  

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to deepsoup:

> I know nothing about dogs really, or breeders.  But when did complete ignorance of the subject ever stop anyone from offering advice around here?  With that in mind, would it be out of order to recommend that you have nothing to do with a breeder and adopt a rescue dog instead?

I am well aware that a rescue dog would be the morally sound choice but With two kids in the house I’m wary of potentially mistreated hounds with temperament issues. And in all honesty I’m fairly shallow and overly swayed by aesthetics, Vizslas are a very good looking breed.

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In reply to Stichtplate:

> Waiting lists of around 12 months for reputable breeders. Just after a bit of a steer really

12 Months!
You could have a new human quicker than that...

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to marsbar:

I have looked at a couple but they mainly seem to be rehousing dogs in the 12-18 month age range that the original owners couldn’t cope with. I’m well aware of how much work it’ll be training and socialising a puppy and really don’t want to bite off more than I can chew with a dog someone else has failed with. 
Once we take on a dog that’ll be it, we won’t be hading it on no matter how much of a pain in the arse it might turn out to be, but saying that, I’d rather start with a blank slate and the knowledge that any failures are my own.

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In reply to marsbar:

> I don't think I ever took mine on public transport.  I guess it depends where you live. We did go in a steam train once which was fine.  

I've got a rescue dog and even though she's lovely most of the time, she does have certain problems that were probably caused by poor training/socialisation, etc. in her formative years. By far better than she was, but she still has her moments...

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 Blue Straggler 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

> Fair do, but from your somewhat 'spiky' posting style (pot kettle black?) I suspect it doesn't take a lot to get crossed off your Christmas card list.

My phrase "multitude of reasons" was used quite deliberately....to cover a multitude of sins!

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 Blue Straggler 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

> You had a Vizsla! 

Has marsbar stated this unambiguously? I might have missed it but I thought she was replying to FactorXXX's comment about dogs in general.

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to FactorXXX:

> 12 Months!

> You could have a new human quicker than that...

True. I think my last one took about 12 minutes. It shows though as it’s totally untrainable, hugely expensive and barely housebroken after over a decade of blood, sweat and tears.

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to Blue Straggler:

> Has marsbar stated this unambiguously? I might have missed it but I thought she was replying to FactorXXX's comment about dogs in general.

I think you’re correct. Not concentrating that much as I’m ostensibly catching up on work stuff whilst lounging in the garden drinking beer

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 marsbar 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

No sorry, I had a dog.  It was a general response to the public transport thing.  He was some sort of shepherd mix, Border Collie size and shape and German Shepard colour and maybe a bit of Belgian Shepard.  

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 marsbar 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

Fair point about rescue dogs and kids. Worth keeping an eye out as they may have a puppy occasionally.  

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 marsbar 21 May 2020
In reply to FactorXXX:

Mine was also unofficially rescued and he was bonkers to start with, but he did calm down eventually.  It took a lot of hard work though and I didn't have children when I got him.  

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 mike reed 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

They are a lovely looking breed. 
They’re also a ton of work, need serious training and a huge amount of exercise. They are one of the more highly strung gun dogs and need to be worked to see their full potential. 

Are you serious about getting one because “they look good”? Please say you were joking! 

There are thousands of lovely rescue pups that need homes that will love and care for them. Save yourself a lot of money, time, and grief and go visit some dog homes (whenever thats allowed!). 
 

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 Yanis Nayu 21 May 2020
In reply to petemeads:

> The Countryfile presenter-farmer Adam Henson has a couple of them, one smooth and one hairy, as pets rather than as working dogs. He seems to think they are great, the ones I have met have all impressed me.

> Good luck getting hold of one!

He’s a farmer you know. 

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In reply to Yanis Nayu:

> He’s a farmer you know. 

What ever gave you that idea?

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to mike reed:

> They are a lovely looking breed. 

> They’re also a ton of work, need serious training and a huge amount of exercise. They are one of the more highly strung gun dogs and need to be worked to see their full potential. 

> Are you serious about getting one because “they look good”? Please say you were joking! 

Aesthetics are just one of a bunch of characteristics I’d outlined up thread and yes as with most potential partnerships or life changing purchases, looks are a consideration. Are you telling me you make such choices based purely on price, personality and practicality?

So have you owned one or just Googled one?

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In reply to marsbar:

> Mine was also unofficially rescued and he was bonkers to start with, but he did calm down eventually.  It took a lot of hard work though and I didn't have children when I got him.  

I took Floss on a bus with the ex and she went absolutely nuts.
Running up and down the bus, jumping up on the seats/over people and peeing everywhere.
Not sure who was more embarrassed, me or the dog...

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 mike reed 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

I made my choice based on family suitability, and the option of giving a dog another chance in a loving home. It did take us 2 goes due to one thing or another. 
We, as a family also did lots of research, including a few dog shows, and luckily a friend at work had a couple of Vislas.
To be fair, the internet wasn’t so available back then so we couldn’t just ask everyone else to do our work for us. 
Each to their own, But forewarned is forarmed as they say. Good luck with your choice. 

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to mike reed:

Cheers for that. We’ve not made a firm choice, just looking for info

Edit:

>To be fair, the internet wasn’t so available back then so we couldn’t just ask everyone else to do our work for us. 

I know, Lazy Bastards eh! It's like all those people reading guide books... they should get out there and climb stuff for themselves, slackers!

Post edited at 17:16
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 wildebeeste 21 May 2020
In reply to FactorXXX:

Same here. Two rescues-one pit bull x catahoula, one rottie. Both adorable but would never leave alone with kids. The rottie is an absolute love sponge with us but has to be on (metaphorical and some times literal) short leash around any body else. She was clearly mistreated in the past and I think will always have a defensive streak that can manifest as aggression. I can’t blame anyone with kids for not wanting to take a gamble on a shelter dog.

Post edited at 17:28
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 Blue Straggler 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

WRT my initial comments and to those from others with more experience of this breed, I seem to recall hearing that they are particularly expensive to kennel (and you might extrapolate from this, that they are "difficult" to leave with a friend or relative if the household is going on a holiday that the dogs can't join)

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 Yanis Nayu 21 May 2020
In reply to FactorXXX:

> What ever gave you that idea?

Some sort of intuition. He never mentions it...

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In reply to Yanis Nayu:

> Some sort of intuition. He never mentions it...

It's like a 'The Fast Show' sketch at times...

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 marsbar 21 May 2020
In reply to FactorXXX:

Awkward.   I shall remember that if (hopefully when) I  get another dog.

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 marsbar 21 May 2020
In reply to wildebeeste:

Generally it's not advised to leave any dog unattended with children.  Even the loveliest dog can snap in pain or fear.   

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 marsbar 21 May 2020
In reply to Blue Straggler:

As I recall my kennels charged based on dog size, because big dogs eat more. I don't think it was any more complicated than that.  

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 Fozzy 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

From what friends with them have told me, the wire-haired ones tend towards being slightly less insane than the short-haired.  

However, all HPRs take a lot of training and need a very firm & consistent stance to stop them being utter hooligans. 

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 Roadrunner6 21 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

You can get rescue, breed specific.

A high energy dog, so need exercise. I've known a few, always great dogs, just high energy and if you dont exercise those breeds they end up in rescues.

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 Ridge 21 May 2020
In reply to marsbar:

> Generally it's not advised to leave any dog unattended with children.  Even the loveliest dog can snap in pain or fear.   

^ This.

We're on our second rescue, lovely gentle dog with people, but far more damaged than we thought (or were told). He's massively better than he was, and he'll make a good dog (but not one I'd trust around stock, or kids). 

But as you say, any dog, regardless of type, background, how cute it is or how much it cost shouldn't be left unattended with kids. 

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 Stichtplate 21 May 2020
In reply to Fozzy:

So the general consensus is highly strung, affectionate, needs loads of exercise and a ton of training or it’ll eat the house.

I’m onto a winner. Me and Mrs Sticht have been together since 1996.

(comparison works both ways)

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 a crap climber 22 May 2020
In reply to gravy:

>... a climbing couple I knew had to deal with the dog feeling it was abandoned every time they left the ground despite being in plain view to the rest of us.

That's cos dogs can't look up. 

At least that's what Big Al says

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 Blue Straggler 22 May 2020
In reply to marsbar:

The vizsla owner who told me about the price of her kennels was a lady who liked to tell everyone the price of all the expensive things in her life, so it’s possible that she simply chose a very expensive kennel and also bigged up her vizslas. I won’t say that she was a truly awful self centred deluded spoiled brat, as that would not be kind. I’ll just say that she and I were chalk and cheese 

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 wildebeeste 22 May 2020
In reply to marsbar:

> Generally it's not advised to leave any dog unattended with children.  Even the loveliest dog can snap in pain or fear.   

True, the difference is the amount of damage either of mine could do in a short space of time compared to say a Westie.

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In reply to Stichtplate:

My brother has them. Horrible animals.

jcm

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 Timmd 22 May 2020
In reply to wildebeeste:

> True, the difference is the amount of damage either of mine could do in a short space of time compared to say a Westie.

I guess it depends on how dog aware the child is, too, and the age and the personality of both.  An elderly dog which likes to snooze could be no danger at all, if it's understood to leave it to snooze. It's definitely a good rule of thumb though.

Post edited at 03:24
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 Timmd 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

Get a mongrel rescue puppy. It'll be healthy and saved from a dreary life in a kennel.

Post edited at 03:24
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 Fozzy 22 May 2020
In reply to Timmd:

> Get a mongrel rescue puppy. It'll be healthy and saved from a dreary life in a kennel.

https://www.dogstrust.org.uk/rehoming/dogs/dog/filters/~529~~~~n~~/1233061/tess

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 veteye 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

I have a client whose youngest is probably their 8th or 9th, so that probably tells you of their consistency. Certainly their dogs are not highly strung. When the family had a death, I offered to keep the 3 dogs for a day for them, and I wouldn't do that with some dogs.

Obviously they're handsome. Some can appear a little skinny. Yet I would go for one, from what you say.

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 veteye 22 May 2020
In reply to a crap climber:

> That's cos dogs can't look up. 

So how come, occasionally dogs catch birds?

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 Stichtplate 22 May 2020
In reply to veteye:

> I have a client whose youngest is probably their 8th or 9th, so that probably tells you of their consistency. Certainly their dogs are not highly strung. When the family had a death, I offered to keep the 3 dogs for a day for them, and I wouldn't do that with some dogs.

Cheers for that. After UKC, quite uncharacteristically, failed to turn up anyone with direct experience as owners I took the extreme measure of joining a Vizsla FB group and having a chat with some people who've spent a few years living with the beasts. General consensus seems to be that they're very similar to many pointers but a little more family orientated and with an extended puppy phase that sees them remain boisterous well into their third year. The 'highly strung' label seems to be a facet of this combined with a relatively small gene pool leading to problem litters from less fastidious breeders. All in all, reports sounded remarkably similar to the consecutive Dobermans I grew up with. One thing has given me paws though, common reports of early years separation anxiety if you enjoy a couple of weeks away on holiday and the fact that the waiting list with reputable breeders is now up to 2 years.

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In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

My sister in law has one. It's like a ginger sack of retarded springs.

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 Stichtplate 22 May 2020
In reply to Timmd:

> I guess it depends on how dog aware the child is, too, and the age and the personality of both.  An elderly dog which likes to snooze could be no danger at all, if it's understood to leave it to snooze. It's definitely a good rule of thumb though.

I'm starting to doubt some of your advice Timmd. Elderly dogs can become unpredictable in their dotage and small children should never be left alone with dogs. I've attended two patients, an adult and a child, who were attacked by dogs, both were left with life changing injuries.

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 Stichtplate 22 May 2020
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

> My brother has them. Horrible animals.

> jcm

Can you be more specific?

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 Fozzy 22 May 2020
In reply to veteye:

Go and watch ‘Shaun of the Dead’ immediately. 

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 Blue Straggler 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

Only STARTING to doubt Timmd’s advice?! 

He has the best intentions but often (not always) “advises“ from a position of zero experience on the topic at hand, just suggesting what he thinks is “morally right” I think. Have you not noticed this before? 

NB many of us, including me, are occasionally guilty of the same

Post edited at 08:25
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 Blue Straggler 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate

>. One thing has given me paws though, 

If you’re here all week with jokes like that, I am glad it’s Friday 😃

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 chadogrady 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

One of my friends has a Vizsla, I have a German Shorthaired Pointer. We take them trail running together with us.  They are both great dogs quite similar. They can easily run all day and it seems like it is nothing to them. Easily clocking up 20 milers. I would say the vizsla seems to suffer more form separation anxiety. Although my GSP did in her first 2 years too. I’m sure you know this but these dogs really need a lot of exercise or they are a nightmare. Unless they are getting a minimum of 2-3 30min off lead runs a day (games of fetch really help them expend their energy), they will find ways to burn off their energy themselves which usually ends up being destructive chewing. I have unfortunately met a few people that have decided to get gun dogs as puppies (because they look amazing) and totally underestimated the amount of work they need and have ended up with a dog they just can’t control. 


My GSP is about to turn 3 and is just now starting to get out of the puppy phase. So be prepared to have a full size dog (30kgs) that acts like a puppy (bouncy) until they are 2-3 years old. At the same time if you make sure they burn off that energy they are really lovely dogs to have around the house. Mine loves a good cuddle on the sofa after a long day on the hills. 
 

On a side note my dog recently got attacked by a Vizsla in our local park (a few cuts and bruises nothing too serious). Having met quite a few other Vizslas this was an unfortunate one off, the owner also said that the dog had never done anything like that. Of course any dog can turn and this is no reflection of the breed. 

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 Stichtplate 22 May 2020
In reply to Blue Straggler:

> In reply to Stichtplate

> >. One thing has given me paws though, 

> If you’re here all week with jokes like that, I am glad it’s Friday 😃

Aahh, you're on the ball this morning

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 Stichtplate 22 May 2020
In reply to chadogrady:

Thanks for that. Exactly the sort of informed and specific advice I was looking for.

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 Blue Straggler 22 May 2020
In reply to chadogrady:

> the owner also said that the dog had never done anything like that. 

I wonder if the owner of a dog that has attacked something, has EVER said "oh yeah it's done that before"  

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 Timmd 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

> I'm starting to doubt some of your advice Timmd. Elderly dogs can become unpredictable in their dotage and small children should never be left alone with dogs. I've attended two patients, an adult and a child, who were attacked by dogs, both were left with life changing injuries.

That was why I said it depended on the age and personality of both. In that it wasn't small children I had in mind, or dogs which were capable of attacking because of their age.

Post edited at 10:52
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 marsbar 22 May 2020
In reply to Timmd:

When dogs get old, like people it can be gradual or sudden.  An older dog who has been perfect all his life might suddenly do something out of character due to pain or dementia.  It isn't predictable.  

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 Siward 22 May 2020
In reply to chadogrady:

We have a Weimerarner/GSP cross, she sounds very similar to your in temperament and athleticism.. However, she's 10 now and still fit and active as ever, no signs of slowing down just yet! She was rescued, by us at 6 months old from someone who was keeping her caged, no exercise, small children, in a flat. She took a fair bit of socialising but is now fine (unless you're a cat, bird, rat etc). 

Mr brother has a Vizsla and she's a lot smaller and does seem to suffer the separation anxiety thing, quite unlike our Ruby who is happy left alone (although still very much a lapdog given half a chance).

Our dog, I think, looks nicer

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 Tringa 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

Can't help with the breed and I can understand wanting a particular breed but can I make a plea for considering a rescue dog?

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of dogs that are in need of a decent home.

You would not necessarily get the breed you want, though as with nearly every other breed there are Vizsla rescue groups.

There is the concern that you might get a load of trouble, but I think that is unlikely from a good rescue organisation as the last thing they want is someone to return a dog to them.

Adopting a rescue gives a better chance to a dog that needs it.

Dave

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 Timmd 22 May 2020
In reply to Blue Straggler:

> Only STARTING to doubt Timmd’s advice?! 

> He has the best intentions but often (not always) “advises“ from a position of zero experience on the topic at hand, just suggesting what he thinks is “morally right” I think. Have you not noticed this before? 

> NB many of us, including me, are occasionally guilty of the same

On the other hand it might be from my having been around aged ten, and been in the same room as an elderly dog which struggled to move about, and my knowing that it liked to be left to snooze in peace.  Does one really need to spell out every single detail on here to not be taken for a doofus? I'd have thought it was obvious that it would depend on the age etc of both. 

I like how it's often for me, but occasionally for yourself, people can read what you post about them on here...

Post edited at 12:59
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 Blue Straggler 22 May 2020
In reply to Timmd:

Calm down. I haven’t been unpleasant or inaccurate. 

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 Stichtplate 22 May 2020
In reply to Tringa:

> Adopting a rescue gives a better chance to a dog that needs it.

Currently looking at a UK and a Cypriot Vizsla rescue charity.

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In reply to Stichtplate:

They are sweet dogs but are usually incredibly high energy, needing a lot of stimulation. Don't get one unless you plan on doing a LOT of walks and a lot of training. Also if you look around it's possible you could find a rescue puppy, they do come about sometimes. 

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 Anoetic 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

Hi

they are a very high energy playful breed, but you could also do what I did and go for a cross.  A vizslador where the dad is a vizsla and mom a Labrador is supposed to calm things down a little 🤦‍♂️. Just don’t believe it...😂.

however he is the most gentle dog I’ve had, and completely chilled out in between short bouts of madness.  He also doesn’t care about going out and Is quite happy sleeping 16 in a day if he wants to.....

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 Siward 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate:

I am very wary of these foreign rescue charities, having heard some very dodgy and concerning tales about them. Ask, why does a rescue charity have so many pedigree dogs available? Why not numerous mongrels instead?  How can you verify the history? I think they're often a case of dodgy puppy farms, breeding 'rescue dogs' for gullible folks, and happy to pocket the few hundred quid you pay. Unless you can be certain it's a genuine rescue, avoid like the plague. (one of our dogs is a rescue from an Irish puppy farm selling 'assistance' dogs for £000s which were nothing of the sort. Buyers would return them, be told that it was essentially their fault they couldn't provide a suitable environment, get no refund and the dog gets sold on again).

Post edited at 16:15
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 SouthernSteve 22 May 2020

In complete agreement with Siward:

Please please please don't import dogs as rescues. This practice should be stopped.

1. There are so many dogs in the UK that need looking after, even more potentially after COVID19.

2. You risk a poor description (family friendly -  suitable for children etc) when they are often street dogs

3. You may inadvertently import diseases such as Leishmaniasis, Ehrlichia or Bartonellosis. 

Please support you local Dog's Trust, RSPCA or UK Breed specific society. They may be fussy about the rehoming, but that is a good thing.

Post edited at 17:14
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In reply to Stichtplate:

Not quite on your precise theme, but I am going to join in as the thread dog fearer. 

They mess me up, the dogs I meet on my runs with their people in train.

Unless they are a springer. I know when I meet one of those I know that it go all over the place but will never hurt me, or even notice me. 

I am at peace with springers.

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 Timmd 22 May 2020
In reply to SouthernSteve:

Yes indeed, a friend used to work in re-homing dogs and you're absolutely right. I don't know why you have a dislike, especially when there is criminality involved in procuring dogs in other countries for people in the UK to rescue because they know people here are 'a soft touch' for dogs.

Post edited at 22:38
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 Stichtplate 22 May 2020
In reply to Timmd:

> Yes indeed, a friend used to work in re-homing dogs and you're absolutely right. I don't know why you have a dislike, especially when there is criminality involved in procuring dogs in other countries for people in the UK to rescue because they know people here are 'a soft touch' for dogs.

Maybe because there are loads of highly reputable charities with dedicated personnel rescuing dogs from places where casual animal cruelty is nothing unusual and tarring all these outfits as criminal and unsafe is as ill judged as any other blanket prejudice?

https://thecheshirepetcharitynetwork.co.uk/animals-needing-a-home/dogspuppies/

https://www.nowzad.com/adoptions

After several posters urged me to look at a local rescue charity I did just that. Tons of staffies that aren't safe in houses with other pets or children, loads of lurchers with emotional issues. Zero pups or indeed any dogs suitable for our home and outdoors activities.

and after being advised against a Cypriot dog rescue charity as a probable scam a very short google revealed just why there seem to be so many organisations based out there.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/nov/09/cyprus-dog-deaths-push-animal-abuse-on-to-election-agenda

Post edited at 22:58
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 Timmd 22 May 2020
In reply to Stichtplate: The dislike you mean? That makes sense, 'do your research' would have been better.

Post edited at 23:20
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 Stichtplate 23 May 2020
In reply to Timmd:

> The dislike you mean? That makes sense, 'do your research' would have been better.

Perhaps, but the dislike wasn't mine.

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 Roadrunner6 02:50 Sat
In reply to Stichtplate:

I've always had rescues but it takes time.

In the UK its much easier but here we get the dogs from southern kill shelters, local rescues have almost none. 

https://www.marysdogs.org/our-dogs/

You can't see the dog before you 'order' them up, and they cost a lot and get shipped up normally. Mine wasn't wanted at all so he got shipped to the state to a foster home. I then paid $100 non-refundable just to see him but I'd already been sent loads of pictures and videos of him with kids and cats. He then cost $600 in total. For that price I could have got a pedigree pup. He then came with heart worm so cost another $1000 to treat.

He's awesome. He's a lab cross tree hound thing. https://www.instagram.com/p/CAaWXzrnU6W/

But it seriously took months of searching and asking for video's until I felt confident he was worth the risk. He's great with our kids. he's crazy anxious and scared of his own shadow unless he's out in the woods running then he's a beast. He was probably a farm dog, he'll live in my truck if given the chance. 

I'll probably get a sheep dog next, I miss collie's. He's great but not the smartest dog in the world. But he's hyperactive and is a constant excuse to get out the house and run/hike.

I meant look at vizsla specific rescues. Breeds like that have lots in rescues who are just poorly trained and under exercised, people get them because they look cute but have no idea that a daily 5-10 minute walk on the leash just is not enough for a breed like that.. With rescue dogs though I think it takes a good 3-6 months for the dog to feel at home and you see the dogs true personality.

Post edited at 03:04
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In reply to FactorXXX:

Dare to be different, don't have a dog. 

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 EdS 09:25 Sat
In reply to Stichtplate:

A few keepers around here had them and /or vizsla lab crosses for a while. 

Good for running across the heather as tall but buggers for running off /no recall once on scent. 

They've gone back to to labs or spaniels (Cockers and small springers in fashion at moment).

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In reply to Stichtplate:

> and after being advised against a Cypriot dog rescue charity as a probable scam 

Really?  I'd be interested to know which charity this is.

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In reply to no one in particular:

A lot of posts here seemingly designed to put people off rescues.  Had 3 in the last few years - all excellent family dogs.  Also have one non-rescue - more problematic needing an experienced hand.  Just for balance....

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 Stichtplate 11:24 Sat
In reply to Andy Gamisou:

> > and after being advised against a Cypriot dog rescue charity as a probable scam 

> Really?  I'd be interested to know which charity this is.

Vizsla rescue Cyprus. Seems legit on the face of it. One of the U.K. admins lives just up the road from me and likes to meet potential families and lots of traffic on the Facebook group.

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In reply to Stichtplate:

I've been involved in game shooting for years. In the pub one night after the shoot I got talking to another member. He asked me if I knew Tony. 'Tony with the visla?', I replied. 'I don't know what he drive's' was what I got back.

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In reply to Andy Gamisou:

> A lot of posts here seemingly designed to put people off rescues. 

Or “several posts advising to check the credentials of any OVERSEAS rescue charities as there have been some dubious practices” 

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There is good and bad in most situations but I, as stated, do not think we should be importing 'rescued' dogs. 

First, there are thousands of dogs euthanised in rehoming / stray circumstance each year in the UK, some simply because they don't have a microchip! If you are black and tan you have a poor chance compared to a white or yellow dog.

Second, most vets have concerns over disease spread through imported dogs (source BVA)

Lastly, some rescue organisations do not do as much checking of the rehomer as others or match the dog carefully to the families circumstances. Regardless of the people, are these dogs going to a home with the five freedoms that should be afforded an animal? However, people who want a dog can feel very frustrated by such rules and this may have fuelled this 'heroic rescue market' from abroad. You can be a local hero

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In reply to Pete Pozman:

> Dare to be different, don't have a dog. 

Ever tried walking a goldfish?

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 Yanis Nayu 16:56 Sat
In reply to Andy Gamisou:

All of our dogs (we’re on number 5 now) have been rescues and have all been wonderful. 

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 Fozzy 19:19 Sat
In reply to EdS:

The ‘pennine pointer’ is apparently gaining some popularity, formed by crossing a GSP & a springer. I’d not use one in the woods (I’m a cocker man), but I’m sure they come into their own on the moors. 

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In reply to Stichtplate:

> Vizsla rescue Cyprus. Seems legit on the face of it. One of the U.K. admins lives just up the road from me and likes to meet potential families and lots of traffic on the Facebook group.

I'll look into it.  Their FB page is private.  Seems odd they get much traffic.  What makes you think they aren't legit?  If they are going to the trouble of meeting potential families - or this part of the scam?  Cheers.

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In reply to Blue Straggler:

> Or “several posts advising to check the credentials of any OVERSEAS rescue charities as there have been some dubious practices” 

Um - no, I only saw only ONE.  I was commenting on posts suggesting that rescues tend to be problematic and bred animals not.  My experience is the direct opposite.  If you're looking for a fight then, frankly, you can f*ck off.  I really can't be arsed. 

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 Stichtplate 07:18 Sun
In reply to Andy Gamisou:

> I'll look into it.  Their FB page is private.  Seems odd they get much traffic.  What makes you think they aren't legit?  If they are going to the trouble of meeting potential families - or this part of the scam?  Cheers.

I wrote "Seems legit on the face of it". It was someone else who suggested they were dodgy.

Edit: Handsome chap in your profile pic (passenger seat, obviously )

Post edited at 07:29
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 Tringa 07:50 Sun
In reply to Stichtplate:

Agree with the posts about avoiding overseas dog rescue organisations.

Apart from all the potential difficulties of knowing anything about the organisation, there are plenty of home grown ones, with loads of dogs, that I don't see a need to look abroad.

Any good rescue will be more than happy to discuss the sort of dog you want and also more importantly your personal situation. They will welcome visits from you so they get a feel for you and you for them.

Unless you spend a lot of time and money this will not be possible with an overseas dog charity.

Dave

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 EdS 09:15 Sun
In reply to Fozzy:

English Springers here. But proper old style tall one. 

Most of the grouse keeper here have labs - local strain. Very sleek. Plus a mix of Cockers or springers

Pheasant tends to be cocker or springer, but still a fair few labs

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In reply to Andy Gamisou:

> If you're looking for a fight then, frankly, you can f*ck off.  I really can't be arsed. 

Wow, major misinterpretation and escalation there. Calm down. No, I was not looking for a “fight”. Should I have put an smiley face emoticon on my post to remove ambiguity? 

(also I saw two, Siward’s and SouthernSteve’s. Fair enough, two isn’t “several”, my apologies, it seemed like more as they were long posts. Similarly I did not see “a lot” of posts saying not to get a rescue dog, quite the converse. But we see and interpret as we want, I suppose. Enjoy your Sunday) 

Post edited at 09:42
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 wbo2 14:01 Sun
In reply to Stichtplate: Not a vizsla but spent some time dogsitting a Gross Munsterlander.  Wonderful dog but I got the impression that if youleft home to go to work it wasn't the dog for you - ridiculous capacity, requirement for exercise .  Also you couldn't take it climbing - too much standing around in farmland.

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 Tom V 08:03 Mon
In reply to Pete Pozman:

I think I've found the solution, Pete:  walk someone else's dog.

They pay food/vet bills and you get half the fun and a fair bit of gratitude thrown your way.

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