/ Tuna mayonnaise - the Skoda Octavia of sandwiches

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hpil 02 Dec 2019

Easy to batch make & assemble. Indestructible if the correct proportion of mayo to tuna is applied, so a half eaten sandwich can be placed safely on a rucsac for bites in between gearing up. Still edible and appetising when cold or with snow on (tho a mate in Sweden tells me they freeze below about -12C). 1/2 a tin and 2 dessert spoons makes 3 sandwiches, then cut in half, giving you snacks throughout the day and some left over for the drive home. Or, if you have some left over at the end of the day then put them in the toaster the following day for a quick rejuvenation, to enjoy with a cup of tea whilst you reminisce on yesterday's fun!

What do you reckon, UKC?

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what the hex 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Sweetcorn adds texture and flavour to a tuna mayonnaise buttie. Onion for additional crunch?

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Durbs 02 Dec 2019
In reply to what the hex:

and some dashes of hot sauce

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muppetfilter 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Im sorry but my experiences with Tuna mayo have always seen sandwiches descend into a liquid pulp. For a snack with the longevity of Dwarf Bread.... Pitta and Primula is the solution

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The Wild Scallion 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

A most repulsive concoction. Yuck

Cheese and pickle all the way. 

Lasts way longer,  no danger of poisoning yourself  with minging past it fish bits.

:-D

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Lusk 02 Dec 2019
In reply to Durbs:

> and some dashes of hot sauce


This stuff http://www.enconasauces.co.uk/product-range/americas/encona-limited-edition-carolina-reaper-chilli-sauce/ is divine!  Surprisingly not that hot but beautiful flavour.

Thanks for reminding me to stock up

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Iamgregp 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

I hate vinegar and don't have it on anything, but a few drops of white wine vinegar in the mix really lifts it...

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nathan79 02 Dec 2019
In reply to The Wild Scallion:

I'm with you on the cheese. A good cheddar cheese piece lasts for days at all but the hottest time of year.

I don't mind tuna, but I'd rather not have a fishy rucksack. 

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hpil 02 Dec 2019
In reply to what the hex:

but would sweetcorn reduce the adhesion between the bread, and thus compromise the indestructibility...? Might try a dash of tabasco for the next outing tho

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what the hex 02 Dec 2019
In reply to The Wild Scallion:

Your weakness for greasy udder based products could also be interpreted as atypical.

Are you familiar with the aquatic ape hypothesis?

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Neil Williams 02 Dec 2019
In reply to what the hex:

> Sweetcorn adds texture and flavour to a tuna mayonnaise buttie. Onion for additional crunch?

Bell pepper also adds to it.

You can also mix it with cooked cold pasta for a very nice pasta salad.  Or use some sort of spiced mayonnaise.

A bit of grated cheese mixed in if you really want to push the boat out (on the basis that the addition of cheese enhances pretty much everything).

Post edited at 13:48
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The Wild Scallion 02 Dec 2019
In reply to what the hex:

> Your weakness for greasy udder based products could also be interpreted as atypical.

> Are you familiar with the aquatic ape hypothesis?

I've "herd" of it before now.  

:-D 

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Pursued by a bear 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Combining one thing I dislike with another thing I dislike doesn't make either of them more appealing.  I'd rate them more as the 20-year old Ford Focus diesel estate; you see them around, they don't have an appealing smell and you'd not catch me with one.

T.

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stevevans5 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Bacon and cheese toastie - Not as good once it has cooled off but still delicious, welded together by the cheese with a solid outer 

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Tom V 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

I actually think I've had more Octavias than tuna gunk sandwiches.

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PaulJepson 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Crunchy peanut butter on brown bread, my friend. That paired with a flapjack and flask of green tea and you're on to a winner. 

And what kind of nutcase puts a tuna sandwich in their toaster? That's asking for a disaster! 

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Neil Williams 02 Dec 2019
In reply to PaulJepson:

> And what kind of nutcase puts a tuna sandwich in their toaster? That's asking for a disaster! 

Toasted sandwich maker?

That said, I do quite like tuna mayo on (cooled down) toast.

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Rigid Raider 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

No, tuna is too oily and for some strange reason gives me painful bloating then awful flatulance.

The absolute king of sandwich fillings is sardines mashed with hard boiled eggs and mayo and lots of black pepper, a variation on good old kedgeree, another king of dishes, which was given to us by Bengal. 

Post edited at 15:48
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Durbs 02 Dec 2019
In reply to Lusk:

Big fan of hot sauces - and yes, Encona is IMHO the best match for a tuna melt.

Sadly, i'm veggie these days, so don't get to indulge as much.

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In reply to hpil:

What do you reckon, UKC?

Mercury poisoning I reckon. And with a cup of tea? Have you heard of biscuits?

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colinakmc 02 Dec 2019
In reply to Tom V:

“I’ve had more Octavias than tuna sandwiches.....”

But with ketchup or HP?

Post edited at 16:46
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marsbar 02 Dec 2019
In reply to muppetfilter:

Completely agree.  

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Moley 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Tinned sardine sandwiches (with other stuff) for me, rather than tuna. No idea how to hold a sardine sandwich together for walking or eating on the go, strictly on a plate at home and mop up the oily dribble afterwards.

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bouldery bits 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

You're all fools.

The answer is a frozen Margherita pizza cooked the night before and carefully wrapped in foil.

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angry pirate 02 Dec 2019
In reply to PaulJepson:

> Crunchy peanut butter on brown bread, my friend. That paired with a flapjack and flask of green tea and you're on to a winner. 

This!

I'm a huge fan of pairing the peanut butter with a smear of lemon curd. The lemon curd offsets the dryness of the peanut butter and the peanut butter offsets the tartness of the lemon curd. A match made in heaven!

Peppermint tea in the flask or hot Ribena. 

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Dave B 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Tuna melt= skoda octavia vrs

Cheese and crisp = Peugeot partner combi

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Tom V 02 Dec 2019
In reply to colinakmc:

That would put it in the Maserati category (numerically)

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Timmd 02 Dec 2019
In reply to Rigid Raider:

> No, tuna is too oily and for some strange reason gives me painful bloating then awful flatulance.

You could visit somebody you don't like?

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Tom V 02 Dec 2019
In reply to Moley:

I prefer to eat sardines out of the tin with bread on the side. During the years I was walling nearly all my stints had an empty tin dropped somewhere in the packing. Not quite as eventful a find for a future archaeologist as a Codd bottle but as good a resting place as a landfill site. 

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Moley 02 Dec 2019
In reply to angry pirate:

Peanut butter and marmalade, PB and jam (common mix), PB and mayonnaise, marmite and marmalade, PB and cheese. Some of my regular sandwich mixes.

Thinking about it, there's not much that peanut butter doesn't go with.

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angry pirate 02 Dec 2019
In reply to Moley:

Pb and j is a taste from my youth. Not sure I've ever tried peanut butter with marmalade. On the list for this weekend!

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Mark Edwards 02 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Mayonnaise – how come I like all the constituent parts but find that particular combination disgusting?

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Timmd 02 Dec 2019
In reply to Moley:

> Peanut butter and marmalade, PB and jam (common mix), PB and mayonnaise, marmite and marmalade, PB and cheese. Some of my regular sandwich mixes.

> Thinking about it, there's not much that peanut butter doesn't go with.

Peanut butter can be quite a nice 'background note' in a curry, it adds something extra to an 80p sauce from a jar if you're short on inspiration for dinner or what have you.

Post edited at 23:36
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Blue Straggler 03 Dec 2019
In reply to Moley:

> Thinking about it, there's not much that peanut butter doesn't go with.

away from sandwiches, last week I discovered that a handful of raisins and a spoon full of peanut butter make a brilliant addition to tinned rice pudding 

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Blue Straggler 03 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Leftover curry pieces in a wrap. Prepare it well but easily (margarine-equivalent on the wrap to avoid the curry soaking the bread), roll it meat and tight, chop it in two, wrap tightly in foil. 

Try to avoid eating seafood in general. 

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Blue Straggler 03 Dec 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Neat and tight ! Not “meat and tight” 

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BnB 03 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

My business partner had a tuna and mayonnaise sandwich every single day for the entire lifetime of our business. And probably for his whole working life, for all I know.

I can’t stand tinned fish so I always avoided him for an hour after lunch. But the pair of us are ying and yang and that was the secret of a successful relationship.

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RomTheBear 03 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

I’ve replaced the tuna mayo sandwich by the tuna mayo wrap. Tortilla wrap don’t disintegrate in the rucksack, have a higher calorie density, and are easier to chew when your face is frozen.

Post edited at 07:37
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hokkyokusei 03 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

I love tuna and mayo, with a bit of onion, black pepper and hot sauce.

But, if it's robustness on the hill that you're after, I give you: soreen and peanut butter. This similar gets more dense and compact that longer it sits in your rucksack, if you wrap it in foil, it will be good for the apocalypse. 

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graeme jackson 03 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Amazed no-one's mentioned Sandwich Spread, the king of sandwich fillers. I just don't understand why the supermarkets put it next to condiments rather than in the jam and marmalade shelves. Using 'their' logic I'd expect to find peanut butter in the chilled foods section next to the bloody lurpack.

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LastBoyScout 03 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Cold weather, maybe - definitely not in hot weather!

I have fond memories of an ex-colleague, sadly now deceased, who always turned up to meetings with a tuna baguette in one hand. Fortunately, fresh, cool and eaten before they stank the room out.

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GerM 03 Dec 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Robust and delicious sandwich fillings can be made with any tasty sauce like leftovers, curry, bolognese, chilly. Just add a small handfull of oats and simmer to thicken and it will aquire the required structural integrity for sandwich (or wrap) making. Thickened chilli with melted cheddar for the win. 

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Colin Scotchford 03 Dec 2019
In reply to muppetfilter:

Primula and pre sliced bagels. Minimum effort, open - 'circular squeeze' - close, job done, lasts for days

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Blue Straggler 03 Dec 2019
In reply to GerM:

Very good tip regarding oats for thickening, thanks!

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Moley 03 Dec 2019
In reply to graeme jackson:

> Amazed no-one's mentioned Sandwich Spread, the king of sandwich fillers. 

Yes, I had forgotten that, it is good but I never think of it as it is never where it should be on the shelves.

Which brings me to fillings I hate. Top place goes to Shippams fish and meat paste - yuk - all of them. The Shippams factory was just down the road from us in Chichester in the 60s and it could stink the town out. God knows what they rendered down in there in those days but I bought a jar last year. No improvement.

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Rigid Raider 03 Dec 2019
In reply to Tom V:

That explains the numbers of sardine tins in British drystone walls!

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Tom V 03 Dec 2019
In reply to Rigid Raider:

I can only take the rap for Derbyshire and Yorkshire!

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Dave Garnett 03 Dec 2019
In reply to muppetfilter:

> Im sorry but my experiences with Tuna mayo have always seen sandwiches descend into a liquid pulp. 

Not if you have the right proportion of decent mayo and robust wholemeal bread.  Our own finely chopped hardboiled eggs plus black pepper in mine.

To be honest I can never leave them long enough to go soggy anyway. 

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ben b 04 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Similarly, I have had more Octavias (two) than tuna mayo sardines (one bite). 

There are Two Rules for sandwiches:

1) There is no sandwich that can't be improved by the addition of a layer of crisps inside prior to eating, and 

2) The Emperor of all Sandwiches remains onion bhaji, Natco green chilli and coriander bombay sandwich spread, mango chutney, and fresh salad leaves/cucumber/tomato in brown bread.

 Am salivating as a I type - Pavlov would be proud!

b

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Blue Straggler 04 Dec 2019
In reply to ben b:

> 2) The Emperor of all Sandwiches remains onion bhaji, Natco green chilli and coriander bombay sandwich spread, mango chutney, and fresh salad leaves/cucumber/tomato in brown bread.

Many years ago, Marks and Spencer sold something extremely similar to this as a pre-packed sandwich and it really was the Emperor of pre-packed sandwiches (the Empress was the Boots Wensleydale and Apple one). 

Good old days of empire. 

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TheDrunkenBakers 04 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Tiger bread or a good granary, nice tuna mayo mix with a good pinch of cayenne with slices of fresh tomato on top is a sandwich of champions.  Add in watercress and its even better.

Post edited at 12:40
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Philip 04 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Malt loaf. Bought sliced. Butter. Replace in package. Done.

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graeme jackson 04 Dec 2019
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

> Tiger bread

Isn't that just a white loaf with a totally unsuitable crust?

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Basemetal 04 Dec 2019
In reply to Philip:

> Malt loaf. Bought sliced. Butter. Replace in package. Done.


Look out for the Winter/ Christmas/Any Excuse Specials packed with nuts and fruit etc... (But beware the weird apple ones!)

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ben b 05 Dec 2019
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Yep, that's the one - well remembered!

Also, absolutely extraordinarily, made by the old grannies of the WRVS Shop at Whiston Hospital, St Helens (minus the Bombay Sandwich Spread, which would have caused their false teeth to melt). Quite why they chose that to sit next to slices of pinkish ham in sliced plastic white bread was beyond me but my god I was grateful. They got 2 quid off me every day for a year I think. I went climbing for a week and they were considering calling the police as I hadn't been in to pickup my "funny sandwich"! 

Interestingly I think the salad in these really makes them go from just great to extraordinary. The texture and colour just add in a way that the usual slice of elderly lettuce in a tired egg mayo just can't compare to.

If anyone knows of a reliable supplier of Natco's Bombay Sandwich Spread I'd be delighted to hear. The Natco site comes up with a phishing warning... but the stuff is magnificent, and hard to track down.

cheers

b

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AllanMac 05 Dec 2019
In reply to hpil:

Tuna mayonnaise sandwiches are Fabialous.

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Moley 18:26 Sat
In reply to Basemetal:

> Look out for the Winter/ Christmas/Any Excuse Specials packed with nuts and fruit etc... (But beware the weird apple ones!)

Some interesting options now, and I quite liked the apple one, trying them all - did I mention the addition of peanut butter???

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Clarence 18:52 Sat
In reply to Moley:

A home made mature cheddar and apple butty is the food of the gods. It needs grating and mixing properly with a curl of soft butter but then you can just bung it in a jar or a bag and spread it on your bread when you stop. No more soggy butties.

Manky fish butties with mayo, nah you can keep them!

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Moley 21:49 Sat
In reply to Clarence:

Now that has me interested, obvious combination ( cheese and apple since my childhood), but would never have thought of grating for a sarnie. Must try.

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