/ New Climate Breakdown Climbing

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As a climbing community how are we going to meet the challenges of climbing and reducing our carbon footprint?

Some crap ones to start: 

  • No Himalayan first ascents count unless you travel overland 
  • Cheeky Alpine weekend climbing trips don't count as a globally aware true summit tick
  • Proper Munro rounds are continuous and are done by public transport
  • Adding transport method onto every route tick list. They only count if there are 3 or more people in your car.
  • Hitch hiking scores more points 
  • Everyone only gets one trip,  big walling in the States, subsequent trips get the cold shoulder down the pub
  • Never leaving the UK doubles your scores
  • Never leaving Yorkshire triples it (and the rest of the country breathes a sigh of relief)
  • Etc......
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mrphilipoldham - on 18:05 Wed
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

What about the holier than thou professionals who like to talk the talk, but very rarely walk the walk? A recent first ascensionist in the slate quarries, who chose a topical route name for example, one of their latest Instagram posts was taking a helicopter out to an island for climbing?

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Jimbo W on 18:17 Wed
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

Perhaps UKC could host a climate flight pledge page. A page of people publicly committed to climbing and walking locally, voluntarily giving up flying, that would be a start!

Your talk of points invokes the idea of an app, a strava for carbon counting your activity, and the improvements you make. I mean living publicly seems to be the thing with Facebook and Strava, so why not for our Carbon impact, which might also be a focus for a new community to share ideas and joint action. Might also one day form the basis for an exchange of carbon credits?

Post edited at 18:41
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DerwentDiluted - on 19:11 Wed
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

I'm investing heavily into a startup business that is looking at ways of sequestering carbon using energy harvested from well intentioned platitudes.

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wercat on 19:31 Wed
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

Oi!! Oi!!  Arvestin' Platipudes indeed...

No mistreatment of Ma's Soupials! 

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toad - on 20:07 Wed
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

Those SAR helicopters burn a lot of hydrocarbons

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In reply to DerwentDiluted:

Nice one. Great minds think alike. You should follow your passion, cos its all good and after the storm the sun will shine. So we are where we are and what goes round comes round. 

Yours platitudinally. 

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profitofdoom on 01:38 Thu
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

Good plan, some more,

*No more nylon ropes: home-made hemp only

*Keep in touch with partners only by letter, delivered by horse carriage. No phones, laptops, or UKC

*No Himalayan first ascents count unless you cycle there

*Drink beer only from hand-carved wooden mugs

*No nylon tents allowed: make shelters from naturally-fallen bits of wood

*When camping, no fires for cooking. Lay food out in sun to warm up

*Wooden bolts

*Guidebooks carved onto slate pages

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SenzuBean - on 06:23 Thu
In reply to mrphilipoldham:

> What about the holier than thou professionals who like to talk the talk, but very rarely walk the walk? A recent first ascensionist in the slate quarries, who chose a topical route name for example, one of their latest Instagram posts was taking a helicopter out to an island for climbing?

While perhaps not the best choice - how does a helicopter ride for 25km compare to an international flight? I'm going to estimate that it's a lot less of an impact.

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In reply to profitofdoom:

A reasonable first attempt Mr Doom. But you must try harder. How as a climbing community are we realistically going to do our bit? Or don't you believe the forecasts? Or is it all just too difficult? 

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mrphilipoldham - on 07:33 Thu
In reply to SenzuBean:

What does it matter? It’s a carbon extravagance in pursuit of the selfish, ultimately. Besides which, I’d be highly surprised if the helicopter was based at the pick up point - so it would not only likely have a transit to there of who knows how many miles, but then also makes four journeys to drop out, fly back, pick up, fly back so at the very least it’s 100km..

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summo on 07:55 Thu
In reply to SenzuBean:

> While perhaps not the best choice - how does a helicopter ride for 25km compare to an international flight? I'm going to estimate that it's a lot less of an impact.

Lead by example. It's not that far to kayak. 

Post edited at 08:00
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summo on 07:59 Thu
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

> A reasonable first attempt Mr Doom. But you must try harder. How as a climbing community are we realistically going to do our bit? 

Climb local, lift share, join a club, communal kit for items rarely used... 

Typical ukc post "we must really be doing something to protect this planet, I've been flying to the alps every year for the past 30 years and each time the glaciers are shrinking, it's shocking."

We are the problem.  

Post edited at 08:00
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In reply to summo:

Good points. Do you think it is possible in a liberal democracy, with its emphasis on individual freedoms, to make a big change? Do we have to ration flights? Ban things? Enforce codes of conducts? Or can it all be done by individual choices through a sort of nudge theory? 

The concepts of limiting travel and freedoms to choose run against just about everything we believe in. 

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summo on 09:00 Thu
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

Tax fuel more. But make fuel costs for those with longer commutes tax deductible. It's non essential travel that needs targetting. Sort out shipping bunker oil. Put 5% more vat on anything non essential.  

People won't consciously make the changes. We do token gestures to make ourselves feel better, thinking it offsets all our bigger bad habits. 

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Clint86 - on 13:42 Thu
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

I've done my last 80 munros only using the train, bike or bus, and it doesn't feel like a punishment. It generally just adds to the trip not using a car.

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Phil79 - on 13:53 Thu
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

> I'm investing heavily into a startup business that is looking at ways of sequestering carbon using energy harvested from well intentioned platitudes.

I predict you'll make a fortune.

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profitofdoom on 15:14 Thu
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

> A reasonable first attempt Mr Doom. But you must try harder. How as a climbing community are we realistically going to do our bit? Or don't you believe the forecasts? Or is it all just too difficult? 

That's Mr. profitofdoom or Mr. profit to you. Thanks Ms. or Mr. Heartinthe highlands

About "Or is it all just too difficult?", yes it is, and it doesn't get any easier. But I've been dealing with comments like that for well over 50 years now

About "Or don't you believe the forecasts?" - I do believe them

OK, I'll "try harder". From now on I'll carpool in my 2nd Porsche once a month, only fly round the world for fun once a month instead of weekly, turn the central heating down to 35 C. in spring, eat no more than 3 steaks a day, keep to 150 MPH max on the M6 on weekend trips to Scotland, buy bikes for the servants, recycle caviar jars, only flush the toilet 3 times, not drive to any shops less than 25 feet away, move to Business Class from First Class every Xmas, and get a secondhand Lear jet, OK?

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DerwentDiluted - on 15:50 Thu
In reply to Phil79:

> I predict you'll make a fortune.

It's a simple yet lucrative process, CO2 + moronic platitudes through a biglie condenser gives pure carbon in the form of diamonds, platinum and Oxymorons.

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In reply to profitofdoom:

Forgive me but are you not being a bit silly about a difficult subject. I would agree that trying to consume less is desperately difficult. I think that applies to all of us. The attitude you describe is not that uncommon and shows us how hard the task is for humankind.

Best wishes

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profitofdoom on 00:42 Fri
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

> Forgive me but are you not being a bit silly about a difficult subject. I would agree that trying to consume less is desperately difficult. I think that applies to all of us. The attitude you describe is not that uncommon and shows us how hard the task is for humankind. > Best wishes

There's silly, and there's irony, which can be effective. The irony is certainly not directed at you, or at Extinction Rebellion

I agree that consuming less applies to all of us

Best wishes to you too

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Pbob on 23:04 Fri
In reply to Heartinthe highlands:

It would be interesting to compare the footprint of our leisure time against the footprint of our work activities. My guess would be that the work footprint of those of us in jobs which don't contribute to the overall betterment of society would far outweigh the footprint from all of our leisure activities. At the risk of offending some here, I'm talking about those on Golgafrinchan Ark Ship B.

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