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music as bouldering

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 paul mitchell 12 Feb 2020
1
 john arran 12 Feb 2020
In reply to paul mitchell:

Hugely impressive. Compelling more for technical brilliance than for inherent musicality, although the section from about 9 mins or so was pretty mindblowing technical wizardry. Thank you for sharing the link.

In reply to paul mitchell:

Great clip!

Different genre, a bit less light-hearted (perhaps), but just as virtuosic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXGeOHdiHrE&

Post edited at 17:16
GoneFishing111 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Jon Stewart:

I find Hamelin's cadenza in his HR No2 quite impressive.. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8u8Ho_3VOBs&

from about 11:30

NERD - how are you getting on? How old are you now?

 gravy 13 Feb 2020
In reply to GoneFishing111:

I'm not sure you can give Font grades to jazz noodling

 deepsoup 13 Feb 2020
In reply to gravy:

Quite right.  It's very long and sustained and it looks awfully pumpy.  Clearly ought to be graded as a route.

 petemeads 13 Feb 2020
In reply to paul mitchell:

Thanks for the heads-up on this artist,  and to the other suppliers of impressive videos. Hard to know how to grade any of these performances - they look to be at the limit of ability but how can a non-player judge?

Climbing/bouldering probably does not look that hard to a non-climbing pianist...

PS have a look on youTube for Richard Hills playing Tiger Rag on the theatre organ sometime.

In reply to GoneFishing111:

> I find Hamelin's cadenza in his HR No2 quite impressive.. 

Oh yes!

Back to jazz, here's a favourite clip of mine:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06_uCl_Bovs&

and another

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTJhHn-TuDY&

 ena sharples 14 Feb 2020
In reply to paul mitchell:

Thanks for sharing-she can play! (and then some)

In reply to paul mitchell:

I don't know what Font grade Daniil Trifonov would get, because he seems to be kind of off the scale:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYAb2FeIlLA&

 paul mitchell 15 Feb 2020
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Adept but  a little self congratulatory,and mechanical.

In reply to paul mitchell:

> Adept but  a little self congratulatory,and mechanical.

Liszt is certainly self-congratulatory. But wouldn't you be if you were the best pianist who ever lived? I've also heard his music described as mechanical before, but I don't really get it. It's certainly very tightly structured, but I don't find the effect at all mechanical. To me, the 12 Transcendental Etudes are music from another realm, and no.5 (Gordon's link) is my favourite. It's like a little gang of impish spirits have sneaked into our material reality and are running amuck.

As for Trivinof's interpretation, well, he's clearly possessed by the spirit of Liszt. I think to hear him play is to witness the supernatural. And he's not all manic bashing, he can do exquisite heartbreaking beauty as well:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQcZR8EasM0&

If the Liszt was some fierce, dynamic roof; then the Chopin is a entirely holdless friction slab. Who's to say which is more difficult? 

In reply to Jon Stewart:

Agreed. Liszt is really over-the-top, so a bit like a multi-pitch rock climb with each pitch taking outrageous lines.

In reply to Jon Stewart:

Thanks for posting the link to the Chopin Nocturne. Sublime.

 krikoman 15 Feb 2020
In reply to paul mitchell:

'orrible init?

Sounds like a load of cats fighting on a piano

While it might be very difficult and hard work, it's equally both to have to listen to.

Post edited at 22:19
 john arran 15 Feb 2020
In reply to krikoman:

I draw an analogy with special effects in films. They can be jaw-droppingly spectacular but if the special effects (the musical virtuosity) are a major part of the film then it's unlikely that the storyline or the dialogue (the melody or the lyrics) will be truly memorable.


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