/ MasterChef Winners - what they are doing now

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subtle on 12 Feb 2019

As its says, a brief run down of what past MasterChef winners are doing now:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/profiles/3MBvFx9h7Ys79NHQQ5Fv7NW/winners

I found it quite interesting, in a way - Thomasina Miers and Matt Folas were always my "favourites", probably along with Natalie Coleman

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TheDrunkenBakers - on 12 Feb 2019
In reply to subtle:

Interesting although I'm surprised that none have earned a Michelin Star.  I would have thought that one might have by now.

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BnB - on 12 Feb 2019
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

> Interesting although I'm surprised that none have earned a Michelin Star.  I would have thought that one might have by now.

Any comparison between Masterchef and Masterchef the Professionals will quickly explain why.

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The New NickB - on 12 Feb 2019
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

Taking a quick look at their profiles, it’s only really James Nathan who has taken the sort of route that might eventually secure a star.

Post edited at 18:52
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Moley on 12 Feb 2019
In reply to BnB:

We always watch the professionals series, but last night I watched the amateurs for the first time. I was immediately surprised by the big gap in basics like food preperation and knife use, the professionals are so much more confident and faster, as a whole.

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Philip on 12 Feb 2019
In reply to Moley:

I preferred the old style, much more about good home chefs who didn't have delusions of turning pro.

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DaveHK - on 12 Feb 2019
In reply to Philip:

> I preferred the old style, much more about good home chefs who didn't have delusions of turning pro.

You mean this one?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Os82UYqssSc

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TheDrunkenBakers - on 13 Feb 2019
In reply to BnB:

> Any comparison between Masterchef and Masterchef the Professionals will quickly explain why.

Oh I get this, especially watching the amateurs in the first round a couple of nights ago.  There is a huge gap in skills, undoubtedly, at the start.  My point was really around the fact that excellent professional chefs, even Michelin starred chefs, start off with no skill and have to have a passion for the trade and a certain amount of talent with a knife and a understanding of what their customers want in taste and service.

Given that the amateurs who win clearly have a passion for cooking and proven their skills in front of a tough audience, I am little surprised that at least one of the winners hasn't tried to take it to the next level and earn a star (I can see at least one has earned Rosettes, however).

They seem to gravitate towards writing columns, books, or doing demos etc.

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Alyson - on 13 Feb 2019
In reply to DaveHK:

Before I clicked the link I was hoping it would be that one!

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subtle on 13 Feb 2019
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

> They seem to gravitate towards writing columns, books, or doing demos etc.

I guess there is a whole lot of difference between being a good cook and running a good restaurant kitchen though

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Ramblin dave - on 13 Feb 2019
In reply to subtle:

> I guess there is a whole lot of difference between being a good cook and running a good restaurant kitchen though

Yeah, from what I've read I've always assumed that it's like the difference between being quite good at karate and successfully invading Russia in winter.

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Philip on 13 Feb 2019
In reply to Ramblin dave:

In the early days of the new format, near the final, they would work in professional kitchens. I remember a barrister on there saying he want to win so he could have a career change to being a chef. Now you have to assume he's earned a decent amount and maybe doesn't need the money - fair enough.

If I decided to quit a cook, firstly I don't see why I'd want to turn a fun hobby into my source of income, but if I did I'd want to cook in my own small restaurant, not sweat under the pressure from some shouty chef.

My wife and I visit a little restaurant run by an ex lawyer or accountant, he cooks a few nights a week for a few covers. Food is okay, bug portions, great flavours, but it's only excellent home cooking. It's a far cry from the imagination you get at somewhere in the Michelin or Good Food guides.

I don't understand the motivation behind some of them, and can't help but imagine great disappointment. Those that have left to write books or teach courses have done very well for themselves. But unless you build enough of a brand (eg Hairy Bikers, Huw F-W, Gordon Ramsay) you're going to be just a passing phase.

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