/ Jobs you wouldn't do

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knighty 11 Sep 2019

I wouldn't want to be an airline pilot for £100k a year - so much time away from family with no weekly routine and working shifts.

Another job I wouldn't do is be an MP. £80k a year and open to as much public scrutiny and the fact that you can never make everyone happy!

What jobs wouldn't you do?

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john arran 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Salesperson for any products or services I wasn't convinced were among the best available.

I'd be crap at it as I'm nowhere near good enough at lying and wouldn't relish the prospect of learning.

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girlymonkey 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

I'm not too fussed about pilot or MP pay, they can do something else if they want.

What about carers and cleaners doing really hard jobs for normally minimum wage or not far off? And I can't say I wouldn't do them, as if I was desperate enough then I would. 

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robert-hutton 11 Sep 2019
In reply to girlymonkey:

Being a doctor is a profession I wouldn't to do I quite like being positive and from a distance it seems you seem to err on the side of caution.

Also don't seem to ill people 😁

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Hat Dude 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Anything involving Jayne Mansfield and Lobsters

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ChrisBrooke 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Anything where I had to speak to people. I like to spend my days listening to music and reading threads on UKC....

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Jon Stewart 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

I wouldn't do most jobs (and most people probably wouldn't do mine). I wouldn't do teaching, I wouldn't do any managerial job that entailed nothing but emails, phone calls and meetings (been there), I wouldn't do anything with long hours, exacting deadlines, I wouldn't do anything outside in the rain, or in noisy factory, or in the south of England (ok maybe Cornwall). I wouldn't work shifts, or with animals, or with anyone involved in marketing. 

Thankfully, I have found one of the jobs out there that I am just about prepared to do - but I wouldn't even do that full time.

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MG 11 Sep 2019
In reply to Jon Stewart:

Love the honesty!

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profitofdoom 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

> What jobs wouldn't you do?

It's a good question, but it needs qualifying - it depends on circumstances - if my family were hungry, I'd do anything to feed them. If not, I'd be far more selective

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Eric9Points 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

A fluffer in gay S&M films or Brexit secretary.

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Ridge 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Police, paramedic, nursing, teaching, social work, sales, management, cleaner, anything involving dealing with the public.

In fact would rather not be working if at all possible.

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LastBoyScout 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

So far, the only jobs I've ever refused to do have been in catering.

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The Wild Scallion 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Anything to do with testing on animals .

Any job taking advantage of people .

Military service , police , traffic warden , social work.

That will do for a start.

Post edited at 11:54
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Dax H 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Given the choice between not providing for my family or doing a job I don't like there isn't anything that is legal that I would not do. 

If I could pick and chose though, no animal testing or slaughtering (hypocritical because I eat them),  no hard manual work because I have done that all my life and I'm pretty broken now in my late 40s, nothing that would involve dealing with abused children because I would be compelled to inflict serious injuries to the guilty party. 

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In reply to knighty:

Once had a great job that did however involve climbing into the space under the public bogs at the linn of Dee and stirring the big old pile of crap with a pitchfork. Some of you hill folk are a bit unhealthy. 

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knighty 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

An interesting array of answers there!

My thinking has been based around what jobs do people think are under rewarded for their work - and that everyone has different things that they value. So to this end, completely unsurprising that people will do anything for their family!

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felt 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Spider farming

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two_tapirs 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

I wouldn't want the job of installing indicators onto BMW's; no one would ever see the end result.

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drolex 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

My current job.

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knighty 11 Sep 2019
In reply to drolex:

Ouch!

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Iamgregp 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Teaching, as I saw what 20+ years of it did to my mother.

Retail (other than something I was interested in like a climbing or music shop), have done it and the hours are long, pay is lousy and you get at least one person a day who makes unrealistic demands then starts spouting off "whatever happened to the customer is always right?!?!"

Anything that involves getting up really early in the morning, I just can't do it.

Sales.  Money is fine and it's easy work and a nice environment to work in (if you look past everyone being a bit of a sale-sy prick) but slowly but surely your soul is eaten away until the self-loathing become unbearable.

Other than that I'm fairly easy.  Though with my knees, back, and general puny constitution physical work is a challenge!

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what the hex 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Garlic bread factory.

Been there, done that, took weeks to get the odour off me.

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jkarran 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

I really struggle to think of jobs I would like to do, the list of those I wouldn't choose is practically endless!

jk

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snoop6060 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Any jobs that require me to go to hotels, wear a suit or endlessly shake people's hand. In fact any job that requires touching people in any capacity.  I'd also actually really struggle to accept a job that included any sort of commuting bar perhaps a 5 mins stroll. And I'd have to be able to leave whenever I wanted, even like 10am having started at 9am. And swear at work, I need to be able to say the word c**t and not get sacked. 

So yeah as expected I work in IT which ticks all these boxes

Edit: and also I couldn't do a job that expected me to be able to spell or use grammer correctly as you might be able to tell from what is written above

Post edited at 14:59
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Wingnut 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Two jobs I've seen done that I'm glad I don't have:

- The unfortunate lifeguard who, after someone had thrown up in the deep end of a swimming pool in Wolverhampton, had to wade around up to his neck in it with a giant fishing net, attempting to capture the, er, bits. Revolting.

- Someone seen rapidly receding in my rear-view mirror whose job appeared to be to leap out, protected only by his orange overalls, into the M54 in the rush hour and remove half a fox from lane 2.  Revolting *and* dangerous.

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Jack 11 Sep 2019
In reply to Eric9Points:

> A fluffer in gay S&M films or Brexit secretary.

Hmm, tough call. Spend all day surrounded by cocks, or work in the movies...

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DenzelLN 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Any public service role, the job i do now - construction, retail. Tbh its easier to think of what i don't want than what i do.

The ultimate answer to me and always has been is to work for yourself.

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Pefa 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Temporary jobs and MacJobs like zero hours and agency work. Absolute disgrace that this goes on as people need security to plan their lives and settle down. 

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Stichtplate 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

There's a temple in the centre of Phnom Penh with an elephant for the tourists to ride. As its holy ground no elephant crap is allowed to hit the deck, so there's this poor bloke dressed only in a loin cloth and carrying a basket, chasing the elephant round. Its 40 degrees and 100% humidity and there's no way he's able to catch a 7kg turd dropped from 2 metres without getting covered.

Other than that. Nurse in a paediatric hospice doesn't sound like a bundle of laughs.

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Tyler 11 Sep 2019
In reply to snoop6060:

> Any jobs that require me to go to hotels, wear a suit..….so yeah as expected I work in IT which ticks all these boxes

I work in IT and can't remember the last time I saw someone wearing a suit (I'm not just talking Linux coders in some basement but anyone at any level. Even the sales people don't anymore (although the suit does seem to be replaced by some awful uniforms depending on your role).

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john arran 11 Sep 2019
In reply to john arran:

> Salesperson for any products or services I wasn't convinced were among the best available.

> I'd be crap at it as I'm nowhere near good enough at lying and wouldn't relish the prospect of learning.

I'm genuinely curious as to what could possibly have caused three dislikes on this post. I fully expect dislikes to this one too, by really funny people, but I'd be really interested to know what could possibly be the reason to dislike the first one, as I'm baffled.

The way I see it there are a great many products out there for sale. Not all of them are going to be among the best available but someone still must have the job of trying to sell them, either wholesale or retail. My point was that I really couldn't see myself being able to do that job. How is that sentiment dislikable? What am I missing?

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mutt 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Anything involving oil exploration, extraction, distribution or sales and that goes for fracking. I cant understand how anyone who turns up at Shell HQ every morning for a work shift can look at themselves in the mirror and feel anything other than shame.

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Enty 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

That one where you wait until tea time and phone someone up to try to get them to change electricity companies.

E

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tjdodd 11 Sep 2019
In reply to mutt:

Similarly, tobacco or e-cigarette company.  I am genuinely interested in how people internally justify working for companies whose products are killing people (if it is the only job you can get then I can accept that).

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AndyC 11 Sep 2019
In reply to mutt:

> Anything involving oil exploration, extraction, distribution or sales and that goes for fracking. I cant understand how anyone who turns up at Shell HQ every morning for a work shift can look at themselves in the mirror and feel anything other than shame.

Yeah, right! Because all those oil workers are going out and actively forcing people to needlessly burn massive amounts of hydrocarbon. Take away the demand if you want to get rid of the supply chain.

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nastyned 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Police, prison officer, military, judiciary. 

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Iamgregp 11 Sep 2019
In reply to mutt:

> Anything involving oil exploration, extraction, distribution or sales and that goes for fracking. I cant understand how anyone who turns up at Shell HQ every morning for a work shift can look at themselves in the mirror and feel anything other than shame.

Weirdly I used to work for a company that had clients such as Rio Tinto (mining), BP etc and also Greenpeace, WWF, Amnesty etc etc.  It was a very odd mix.

Interestingly BP, who were one of the companies biggest clients, were fine with us working for Greenpeace and the other NGOs, but when we got a contract with Shell they threw their toys out of the pram and said if we did it they wouldn't work with us anymore.  Strange world. 

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GridNorth 11 Sep 2019
In reply to mutt:

IMO that's an extremely privileged, middle class attitude to take and dare I say really just amounts to virtue signalling.

Do I take it you walk every where?  If not they are merely satisfying a demand that you are helping to create. If you never use fossil fuels I take it all back.

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Fruitbat 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

> I wouldn't want to be an airline pilot for £100k a year - so much time away from family with no weekly routine and working shifts.

Yes, there are plenty of jobs that seem as if they'd be a good number from the snapshot that most outsiders have but the overall picture isn't always as rosy. To continue with your example, I knew an airline pilot who, in addition to the irregular hours and shifts, had some of his time rostered as the standby pilot in case of sickness etc. Not too bad, you may think - however, this was a 1-hour standby (had to be in work a max of 60mins after being called), he was based at Heathrow but lived in Manchester, so his standby time was spent in and around a Travel Lodge type place next to Heathrow. Can't remember how many days at a time he spent on standby but it's an example of an unseen side of what many may initially perceive as an exciting job. 

I'm quite aware there are many jobs that have a lot worse sides to them than the story above, plenty of examples in this thread. 

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Andy Hardy 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Just been reading the latest advert from Rab. There is just no way I could write the following -

"Since our founding in 1981 we have worked at the forefront of insulation technology, becoming masters of our craft. Developing cutting-edge insulation designs requires the same approach that we bring to the mountains. Moving constantly forward with careful thought and consideration, we continue to break new ground",

and mean it. 

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GarethSL 11 Sep 2019
In reply to mutt:

> Anything involving oil exploration, extraction, distribution or sales and that goes for fracking. I cant understand how anyone who turns up at Shell HQ every morning for a work shift can look at themselves in the mirror and feel anything other than shame.

Feel quite the opposite thanks. Mostly because we're educated types who understand the basic principals of global energy demand and are realistic enough to comprehend the economic requirements for a green energy transition. Whether you realise it or not, the inner workings of most big energy companies is shifting towards renewable energies and has been for some time. My colleagues and I are part of that shift, no shame there.

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mark20 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

I couldn't work in a helium balloon factory. I won't be spoken to in that tone...

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ebdon 11 Sep 2019
In reply to mutt:

Says the man using a electronic device powered by fossil fuels built of materials that have been mined....

(I actually work in decarbonisation but this kind of lazy ill conceived attitude really annoys me)

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Hooo 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Any job that involves cold-calling people, but especially if it is to sell something you know is worthless.

I despise anyone who does this, and I genuinely believe I couldn't force myself to do it even to feed my family. I could work in abbatoir or shovel shit without qualms though.

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Lusk 11 Sep 2019
In reply to GridNorth:

Oh how I laugh when I read posts like mutt's.
Are they that clueless?

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Pan Ron 11 Sep 2019
In reply to tjdodd:

> Similarly, tobacco or e-cigarette company.  I am genuinely interested in how people internally justify working for companies whose products are killing people (if it is the only job you can get then I can accept that).

How do you feel about Apu working in the Off License?

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tjdodd 11 Sep 2019
In reply to Pan Ron:

Interesting question. It's easy for me to say as I have never had to work in a shop selling tobacco. I feel working in the factory is worse than the shop but clearly that is irrational. Each is contributing to tobacco deaths. Mmmmm.

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JamieA 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

The duty manager at Redpoint Bristol (as advertised above in the promoted posts); £9.60 per hr to be responsible for the safety and running of the wall (I'm assuming by the "manager" bit).

I was on £10 per hour as a bog standard instructor at The Edge fifteen years ago! 

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freeflyer 11 Sep 2019
In reply to girlymonkey:

> What about carers and cleaners doing really hard jobs for normally minimum wage or not far off? And I can't say I wouldn't do them, as if I was desperate enough then I would. 

Friend of mine gave up full-time book-keeping in the fashion industry for 20 hours a week caring for end stage Alzheimer patients in her local care home and some cleaning for older folk; hubby does a 3 day week doing house clearances for the local hospice and some DIY. Sometimes money is not the top priority, and hard work not the bottom one. Most of their extra money goes on supporting her nearly blind diabetic Mum in Sardinia who is still managing to live independently. I do what I can (and am allowed to do) and worry about being seen as interfering :/

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Le Sapeur 11 Sep 2019
In reply to snoop6060:

> Any jobs that require me to go to hotels, wear a suit or endlessly shake people's hand. In fact any job that requires touching people in any capacity.  I'd also actually really struggle to accept a job that included any sort of commuting bar perhaps a 5 mins stroll. And I'd have to be able to leave whenever I wanted, even like 10am having started at 9am. And swear at work, I need to be able to say the word c**t and not get sacked. 

I go to hotels and wear a suit but I always choose my own hotels. Usually small quirky places on Sawdays or Airbnb. So much better than the corporate hi rises. Also my suit is quite individual and I like wearing it. If you are fortunate enough to have these choices then suits and hotels are great. I hate travelling in scruffy clothes. 

 I shake hands. I can also think of some jobs where touching people wouldn't be too awful! Shaking someone's hand isn't too bad. Being from a climbing background I can more than return the 'crusher', which always gets a surprised look as I'm not of a large build as most hand crushers seem to be.

My commute is usually 20 hours flying. Drinking booze, eating food and watching films, which isn't too stressful. I have a policy of never working on a flight.

I can't always leave an hour after I start, but I am the boss so can be quite flexible. 

I swear at work. My favourite profanity is c*ntasaurus! As of yet I haven't sacked myself for swearing. 

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Hooo 11 Sep 2019
In reply to tjdodd:

I would say the opposite. Working to produce a product that people want but can harm them can plausibly be justified ethically. Informed adults can make their own decisions about whether the damage the product does is worth it for them. The person making the product is not responsible for their decision.

Advertising such products on the other hand is evil. I believe that advertising or promoting in any way the use of something​ addictive is utterly immoral. To work in this field is to make your living from people's weakness and pain. Tobacco, alcohol, gambling, heroin, it doesn't matter what, if you're making a living by encouraging its use you are the lowest of the low.

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Snyggapa 11 Sep 2019
In reply to GarethSL:

> Feel quite the opposite thanks. Mostly because we're educated types who understand the basic principals of global energy demand and are realistic enough to comprehend the economic requirements for a green energy transition. Whether you realise it or not, the inner workings of most big energy companies is shifting towards renewable energies and has been for some time. My colleagues and I are part of that shift, no shame there.

I did it for about 15 years, no shame. It's a simple demand and supply equation in order to optimise money.

If the average consumer cared enough not to waste energy as much as the producers cared about their optimisation, the world would be a better place. Energy is too cheap, hence lazy people waste it. 

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Le Sapeur 11 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

There aren't many jobs I wouldn't do if the need arose. However the following are quite unappealing.

Vet. Especially in birthing situations. Although I have heard it can warm your hands on a cold day.

Office jobs with lots of 20 somethings.

Captain of any ferry journey lasting less than an hour.

Soldier.

Torturer. Hangman.

Labs testing on animals.

Whisky taster. I enjoy whisky.

HR. Just the initials are enough to turn me off.

Mountain guide.

Chef in a restaurant where the chef has no control over the menu, and the menu never changes.

Almost any job at sea for prolonged period of time.

Astronaut. Prolonged time in space.

Cutting up ships on an Indian beach.

Stand up comedian.

Anything that involves being nice to famous people.

The guy who sits semi-naked in a field for 10 mins while someone counts his midge bites.

Parent.

Pedal rickshaw rider in the UK.

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snoop6060 12 Sep 2019
In reply to Le Sapeur:

Some people love all that no doubt but a hotel is a hotel and a suit is a suit. It's all the doing 'business' stuff it represents. I've done it and absolutely loath everything about it. I'd rather sit neck deep in a ditch on my own for 8 hrs days as a living.  I'm not cut out for corporate life. 

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McHeath 12 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Blowjobs

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Duncan Bourne 12 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

There's quite a few I wouldn't do because I have seen the effect on people who do them. But a couple near the top would be.

teacher

social worker

Great professions but ones where you are scrutinised for everything you do, pilloried for the smallest errors and expected to work above and beyond for no extra pay or even thanks. I've seen so many people burn out its untrue.

Actually what it boils down to is I wouldn't like to do any job where I had zero autonomy, was micro-managed and had to suffer abuse with a smile

Post edited at 08:30
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HakanT 12 Sep 2019
In reply to Eric9Points:

Are fluffers still a thing, or did Viagra kill off the entire profession? Asking for a friend.

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HakanT 12 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

I can only think of two opportunities that I've been approached about when I was looking for a job that I didn't at least explore further. The first one was a role in a porno and the second was Head of Digital at British American Tobacco. It took me longer to turn down the porno.

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davidalcock 12 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

ATOS assessor, and their ilk. How do they sleep? 

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peppermill 12 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

As others have said if I was desperate I'd do whatever if i was legal. Assuming I have the choice-

Night club doorman. Paid my way through university the first time around by doing this, I've done lots of sh*tty jobs but this tops the lot. You see the worst side of people all the time and just end up hating everyone. There's a reason many of them are cnuts, they spend all night dealing with them.

Aside from that I'd go slightly mental doing a job that didn't involve helping others, I need more of  a purpose than just working for my pay at the end of the month.

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peppermill 12 Sep 2019
In reply to mutt:

> Anything involving oil exploration, extraction, distribution or sales and that goes for fracking. I cant understand how anyone who turns up at Shell HQ every morning for a work shift can look at themselves in the mirror and feel anything other than shame.

Jeez. And I was worrying about how I would come across to others with my post. What is it you do that has such a positive influence on the environment?

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peppermill 12 Sep 2019
In reply to davidalcock:

I don't think many do. Or last much longer than 12 months....

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Tom V 12 Sep 2019
In reply to JJ Krammerhead III:

Toilet cleaning doesn't sound much fun but it depends on the circumstances. When I was 18 and newly qualified to drive (but with no car of my own) I was working a summer job on the bins.  I was transferred to the bog cleaning department and had to clean all the WCs in Saddleworth . But along with the mop and bucket they gave me the keys to a brand new Ford Escort van..........some days it took me an hour to drive between the Clarence bogs and those at Binn Green............

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spartacus 13 Sep 2019
In reply to Tom V:

I don't think I would mind toilet cleaning, it depends on your mental approach, some people it would drive round the bend. You would have to take it seriously not just go through the motions.

A probationary period would be needed to get your hand in, or drop out.

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Sherlock 13 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Police Diver. Grim.

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profitofdoom 13 Sep 2019
In reply to Sherlock:

> Police Diver. Grim.

Grim indeed. But my worst nightmare job is teacher of mid-teens in a rough secondary school..... not for me, though it is for some people (I admire them)

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SC 13 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

A lot of people wouldn't want to work with sewage for understandable reasons but in my years working in the water industry, I have never met an unhappy worker in a sewage plant, they're always cheery even when up to their waist in waste.

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Neil Williams 13 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

The main one is that I don't believe I could kill somebody deliberately (regardless of what they had done) so I couldn't be in the military or an executioner or similar.

Other than that there's jobs I wouldn't like more than that I wouldn't do, and often it's because they're underpaid for the effort involved rather than because I'd object to the actual job.  Something like care workers come under this one - they tend to get minimum wage but really when you look at the effort that goes in they should be on at least £30K.

(FWIW I've done a good many literally s****y jobs in Scouting for nowt! )

Post edited at 14:08
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Uluru 13 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

Sewage treatment plant operative or abattoir worker

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aln 13 Sep 2019
In reply to SC:

> up to their waist in waste.

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aln 13 Sep 2019
In reply to knighty:

9 years ago my life turned upside down in 10 minutes. I lost everything I had, and ended up homeless, penniless and jobless. I used the local library internet to find a home and look for a job. I eventually found both. One job I applied for was working on the production line in a local food factory. Everyone said 'Anyone can get a job in The Shunk'. Despite getting everything correct in the computer test and being told I had the fastest time ever, I didn't get the job. I would've taken the job, but I think it would've driven me crazy. I dodged a bullet that day.

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Le Sapeur 14 Sep 2019
In reply to snoop6060:

> Some people love all that no doubt but a hotel is a hotel and a suit is a suit. It's all the doing 'business' stuff it represents. I've done it and absolutely loath everything about it. I'd rather sit neck deep in a ditch on my own for 8 hrs days as a living.  I'm not cut out for corporate life. 

Each to their own. I guess it depends who you are dealing with in your line of business. Sounds like you had the shitty end of the stick. My line of work deals with some very nice people and if I don't like someone I don't work with them. 

I disagree with your hotel and suit comment. A bit like saying a meal is a meal or a climb is a climb. All different experiences. 

Out of interest where do you stay on holiday if you don't like hotels (and assuming my earlier Airbnb comment precludes you from using b&b's etc)?

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The Grist 08:50 Sun
In reply to knighty:

Teaching......I actually retrained as a history secondary teacher a couple of years ago. I lasted 6 weeks in a ‘outstanding school’ before leaving. Most stressful, unrewarding and difficult 6 weeks of my life. Will never go back. 

I currently work as a personal injury lawyer. I have a client who developed repetitive strain injury wanking off pigs. That kind of puts other jobs in context. 

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HakanT 15:01 Sun
In reply to The Grist:

I think it's fair to say that your client won this thread.

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Ridge 18:36 Sun
In reply to The Grist:

Hmmm. Pig wanker or personal injury lawyer. Tough choice...  

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Timmd 15:04 Mon
In reply to peppermill:

> Jeez. And I was worrying about how I would come across to others with my post. What is it you do that has such a positive influence on the environment?

He has a point about fracking, but that's something for another thread. 

Post edited at 15:04
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Neil Williams 15:19 Mon
In reply to Le Sapeur:

FWIW I work in corporate-land and haven't worn an actual suit (as distinct from just formal shirt and trousers) for absolutely years.  Mostly you can get away with a toned-down outdoorsy look instead, i.e. a black or dark coloured soft shell instead of a jacket, particularly if like me you never wear a jacket indoors as it's too hot - first thing I would ever do on entering an office is take it off.

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Neil Williams 15:20 Mon
In reply to The Grist:

> Teaching......I actually retrained as a history secondary teacher a couple of years ago. I lasted 6 weeks in a ‘outstanding school’ before leaving. Most stressful, unrewarding and difficult 6 weeks of my life. Will never go back. 

Not sure if I'd want to teach or not - but I definitely think it is seriously underpaid for the effort required.

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Timmd 16:47 Mon
In reply to Neil Williams:

Teaching secondary teaching can apparently be as stressful as coal mining.

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subtle 16:51 Mon
In reply to Neil Williams:

> Not sure if I'd want to teach or not - but I definitely think it is seriously underpaid for the effort required.

But think about the short working day, and the holidays that teachers get.

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Seymore Butt 17:40 Mon
In reply to knighty:

My daughter's married to a dairy farmer with a flock of hill sheep as well. Up at 5am, works till 7/8pm everyday of the week with only 7 days holiday a year (if he's lucky).

At least he gets to drive some serious bits of farm machinery.

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The Grist 18:55 Mon
In reply to subtle:

I was working 70 hours a week when I was teaching. As a lawyer I only work about 45. 

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In reply to The Grist:

> I currently work as a personal injury lawyer. I have a client who developed repetitive strain injury wanking off pigs. 

It's no picnic being an intern at the House of Commons.

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Phil Lyon 19:12 Mon
In reply to Jon Stewart:

If you add term-time only to that list I'd like to know what job you do, so that I can apply.

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Neil Williams 21:17 Mon
In reply to subtle:

> But think about the short working day, and the holidays that teachers get.

Though no choice of when to take them (so holidays are expensive) and they spend a fair bit of the time preparing lesson plans, marking etc.  TBH, I'd take my rather smaller amount of "take when you like" annual leave any day.

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Neil Williams 21:18 Mon
In reply to Timmd:

> Teaching secondary teaching can apparently be as stressful as coal mining.


Assuming you're not claustrophobic I wouldn't have thought coal mining was *stressful*, just physically really hard.  I'd imagine stock dealing is probably a lot more stressful.

Post edited at 21:18
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alan moore 21:29 Mon
In reply to profitofdoom:

> But my worst nightmare job is teacher of mid-teens in a rough secondary school.....

Teaching in a posh secondary school might be worse..

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alan moore 21:33 Mon
In reply to Neil Williams:

>I wouldn't have thought coal mining was *stressful*, just physically really hard.  

A teacher gets paid for standing around and talking. A miner would get the sack for that!

In fact, even if you work hard, they shut your mine down anyway. Which is very stressful.

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Timmd 21:37 Mon
In reply to Neil Williams:

> Assuming you're not claustrophobic I wouldn't have thought coal mining was *stressful*, just physically really hard.  I'd imagine stock dealing is probably a lot more stressful.

I guess stress in a job can be relative to an individual's ability to cope. It was a teaching relative during the mid 90's who was talking about secondary school teaching being comparable to mining, the era it was said in has set me wondering whether it was to do with the shaky footing mining was on in the UK at the time, or if it was looking at mining across the board to do with noise exposure sometimes leading to excess stress and disturbed sleep, or what. Googling doesn't throw anything up comparing secondary teaching and mining.

Post edited at 21:38
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Neil Williams 21:39 Mon
In reply to Timmd:

> I guess in the end, stress in a job can be relative to an individual's ability to cope. It was a teaching relative during the mid 90's who was talking about secondary school teaching being comparable to mining, the era it was said in has set me wondering whether it was to do with the shaky footing mining was on in the UK at the time, or if it was looking at mining across the board to do with noise exposure sometimes leading to excess stress and disturbed sleep, or what. Googling doesn't throw anything up comparing secondary teaching and mining.


Might well be a more general meaning of "stress" as "negative effect on the body" - comparing the stress of teaching with the physical effort and poor working conditions of mining, perhaps.

If all jobs were paid the same I'd definitely do a more physical job, though.

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Timmd 22:07 Mon
In reply to Neil Williams:

> If all jobs were paid the same I'd definitely do a more physical job, though.

I know what you mean, in how the physical body is designed to be active - and it feels good to be, but the stress of staying uninjured can be a factor in physical work. I definitely think that the pay should be much higher for the manual workers who can end up with worn out knees and elbows, and dodgy backs and what have you, I knew of a guy who got told he had 'construction knees', during the process of having replacement knee joints fitted after being a construction worker for most of his life. I guess the search for the perfect job can be a long one. 

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Jon Stewart 22:23 Mon
In reply to Neil Williams:

> If all jobs were paid the same I'd definitely do a more physical job, though.

I'm not sure. Part of what I like about my sedentary job is that when it finishes, I can't wait to dash up a mountain by an obscure and dangerous route, or go bouldering, and run home before it gets dark. I reckon if I'd been heavy lifting all day, I'd be straight home for beers and light entertainment.

If I lived in a city where I couldn't climb or get up a hill etc after work, I guess it would be better to get some exercise at work. But then I'd move.

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Timmd 10:35 Tue
In reply to Neil Williams:

I was thinking about lifespan and life outcomes a while ago in relation to different jobs, and about people who live in the 'blue zones' around the world where people have the longest lifespans. Apparently there is a correlation between having being active as an integral part of one's daily life and living for longer*, which set me thinking that there might be something to be said for some of the less interesting or stimulating jobs which require people to be on their feet during the day, so long as people can afford to live on the wages, and eventually retire too.

*Active in the sense of gardening manually, or having to frequently move about during the day being good enough, that is, rather than hard physical work or going to the gym.

Post edited at 10:41
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Timmd 20:18 Thu
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:

That appeals to me, if there's some safety measures like a 'break away' to stop the chainsaw getting caught up from endangering the helicopter, and something to stop electricity from going up to it, I'd be very keen.

The amount of focus needed would be stimulating I think, more involving than some other jobs. 

Post edited at 20:20
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cb294 20:53 Thu
In reply to Timmd:

I agree, but look at these guys installing spacers on a live 756kV line from a helicopter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPNK7bc2qvM

Or even worse, transferring workers onto a live high voltage line:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_NEAEGeFIw

Yes, birds sit on power lines...

CB

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Timmd 21:03 Thu
In reply to cb294:

The first job doesn't seem to bad, but seeing the helicopter flying away in the second video must be a weird feeling. 

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Lusk 21:13 Thu
In reply to cb294:

> Yes, birds sit on power lines...

They're warming their feet.

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Ceiriog Chris 22:27 Thu
In reply to mutt:

> Anything involving oil exploration, extraction, distribution or sales and that goes for fracking. I cant understand how anyone who turns up at Shell HQ every morning for a work shift can look at themselves in the mirror and feel anything other than shame.

Why ?

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