UKH

/ Hill or Mountain?

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subtle on 05 Dec 2018

Hmm, is Foel Penolau a hill or a mountain then?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46441129

Sure a bigger debate then the grade of 3 pebble slab, or even Brexit?

 

malky_c - on 05 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

Regardless, it's an arse of a hill ;-)

Eric9Points - on 05 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

There are no mountains in Britain.

Gordon Stainforth - on 05 Dec 2018
In reply to Eric9Points:

What do you think that is? -

http://torridonblog.sais.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/IMG_0539-1024x575.jpg

Post edited at 13:31
Moley on 05 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

If Myrddyn says it is a mountain, then it is a mountain. Great place, so long as you don't lose the path!

alan moore - on 05 Dec 2018
In reply to Eric9Points:

In Wales everything vertiginous is a mountain.

In Scotland it's always hill.

Usually always anyway.

malky_c - on 05 Dec 2018
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Liathach - nice hill!

Andy Mullett - on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to Moley:

Path....hahahahaha.  See you up there soon. A

 

Blue Straggler - on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

I have spent my life until yesterday when i saw the story, convinced that the height criterion for a mountain was 3000 feet, not 2000 feet!

Moley on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to Andy Mullett:

> Path....hahahahaha.  See you up there soon. A

Well, goat track!!

Must get back there this summer, currently both full of "lurgy". Keep well.

subtle on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to Blue Straggler:

> I have spent my life until yesterday when i saw the story, convinced that the height criterion for a mountain was 3000 feet, not 2000 feet!

I blame brexit for lowering the criteria, the expectation now being everything over 2000 feet will be classed as a mountain

girlymonkey - on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

I never thought there was a difference! I always thought it was 2 words for the same thing, I tend to use hill if I'm walking and mountain if I am mountaineering! 

subtle on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to girlymonkey:

> I never thought there was a difference! I always thought it was 2 words for the same thing, I tend to use hill if I'm walking and mountain if I am mountaineering! 

By that definition then most in the UK would be both -  hills (walk up them on path) and mountains (to go mountaineering on them away from the path up them)

Sir Chasm - on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

If some people call them hills and some people call them mountains then they're already both. In any event, they're all hills and some are mountains too.

mnyateley - on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

> Hmm, is Foel Penolau a hill or a mountain then?

> Sure a bigger debate then the grade of 3 pebble slab, or even Brexit?

Hill or Mountain? I think it was the Ordnance Survey, in its wisdom, that defined a mountain as being over 2000 ft which equates to being above 600 metres these days.

subtle on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to mnyateley:

> Hill or Mountain? I think it was the Ordnance Survey, in its wisdom, that defined a mountain as being over 2000 ft which equates to being above 600 metres these days.

Hmm, what about the Douglas Boulder then?

Boulder/Hill/Mountain?

john arran - on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

Clearly neither. It's a Peaks ;)

subtle on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to john arran:

> Clearly neither. It's a Peaks ;)

Its only a singular boulder though so no plural. The Douglas Peak?

girlymonkey - on 06 Dec 2018
In reply to subtle:

Indeed, I refer to the same mass of raised ground by both names.i see them as synonymous. So if I am mountaineering, I usually talk about going up the mountain. If I'm walking, I usually refer to the hill


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