/ UK 3000ers Completers list . Totalling 303 summi

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Completist6503 27 Sep 2019

Ive recently just completed the English and Welsh 3000ers to add to my Munro round compleation summitting all 303 seperate Hills and mountains above this height in UK. Ive recorded this on 2 post specific with images of all 303 summits . 

Is their a completors list yet for this challenge?

Ian Simpson SMC Munro completist 6503. Would the UKC like to start one ?

4
Deleted bagger 27 Sep 2019
In reply to Completist6503:

I don't think there's a specific list but the SMC site details all the 3000ft compleatist.

So far I've done the Munros, Munro Tops, Firths plus Corbetts. Currently working my way through the 2000 footers.

johnhenderson 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Completist6503:

I didn't realise  hill walking was a competition. 

I've spent the last 30 years doing it all wrong.

Silly me.

11
axor 28 Sep 2019
In reply to johnhenderson:

It's great that people are proud to complete x amount of hills over x meters high. Not a competition for me. However, I have climbed 54 of the SIMMS of England and I did it for myself thank you very much!

If you make a note of the areas you have walked and try to walk new areas you will be sure to see more of the beautiful national parks we are so lucky to have.

1
Dan Arkle 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Completist6503:

I sort of assumed that every* Monro Compleatist would add the English and Welsh cherry on top of the cake!? 

*It must be 75%+ surely? what else are they going to do? Give up walking? 

Deleted bagger 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Dan Arkle:

> I sort of assumed that every* Monro Compleatist would add the English and Welsh cherry on top of the cake!? 

> *It must be 75%+ surely? what else are they going to do? Give up walking? 

They could also do the Munro Tops. I think it's only about 10℅ of Munro compleaters go on to finish the Tops. In resent years the Tops have been made easier with the demotion of Knights Peak.

Pero 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Dan Arkle:

> I sort of assumed that every* Monro Compleatist would add the English and Welsh cherry on top of the cake!? 

> *It must be 75%+ surely? what else are they going to do? Give up walking? 


There's no law that stops you climbing the same hill more than once. 

Dan Arkle 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Pero:

Touché 

I presume the Monro Tops is a really big undertaking, unless done in conjunction with your Munros?

Fruitbat 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Deleted bagger:

> They could also do the Munro Tops. I think it's only about 10℅ of Munro compleaters go on to finish the Tops. 

Most people probably aren't that aware of the Tops when they start the Munros and so may be quite a way through their round before they realise that they are something to compleat alongside the main summits. I suppose that by this time they won't bother going back to hills just to do the Tops, especially if, say, they only get to Scotland once or twice a year anyway. 

Those who start a second round or - probably more realistically - do second ascents whilst still compleating their first round may realise that it's worth ticking the Tops alongside the Munros. I wonder if anyone has just done a round of the Tops i.e. just had hill days that covered all the Tops but not any of their associated Munros? (ignoring any days that may have included Munros whilst carrying out this feat). Edit: Dan Arkle has just asked similar in the post before this.

I bet the number of Toppists (Toppers?) reduces as a percentage of Munroists just because the latter will keep increasing and doing the Tops will always be slightly more niche, or even unknown to many. Doing the Corbetts will probably be the next list that most Munroists start.

Post edited at 16:30
Toccata 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Fruitbat:

Hamish Brown said he didn’t regard you as a compleater until you had done the tops too.

Fruitbat 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Toccata:

> Hamish Brown said he didn’t regard you as a compleater until you had done the tops too.

Well, about 6000 of those SMC-registered Compleaters are going to be dissappointed when they hear of Hamish's thoughts (assuming the 10% of Munroists do the Tops as well).

Deleted bagger 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Fruitbat:

> Well, about 6000 of those SMC-registered Compleaters are going to be dissappointed when they hear of Hamish's thoughts (assuming the 10% of Munroists do the Tops as well).

I'm all for it. I'd easily make it into the first 500!

Fiona Reid 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Dan Arkle:

> I presume the Monro Tops is a really big undertaking, unless done in conjunction with your Munros?

Perhaps, We did the Tops when doing our second round of Munros, there's a few that are a long way from anywhere so you have to be pretty dedicated to do them all.

Dave the Rave 28 Sep 2019
In reply to Pero:

> There's no law that stops you climbing the same hill more than once. 

I agree. It’s nice to have a hill that you can wander up without having to  think too much about navigation etc. Just switch off and enjoy the landscape

Mark Bull 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Completist6503:

To answer the original question, I think the answer is no: the SMC Munroists list only recognises completion of the full set of Furths, including Ireland. 

Roadrunner6 29 Sep 2019
In reply to axor:

> It's great that people are proud to complete x amount of hills over x meters high. Not a competition for me. However, I have climbed 54 of the SIMMS of England and I did it for myself thank you very much!

> If you make a note of the areas you have walked and try to walk new areas you will be sure to see more of the beautiful national parks we are so lucky to have.

Exactly, challenges like this get people around the UK. Through doing the munro's (not completed yet), I got to see parts of scotland I might not otherwise have visited.

felt 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Fruitbat:

> Most people probably aren't that aware of the Tops when they start the Munros 

I wasn't even aware of the Munros when I started the Munros, leading to much subsequent repetition just to iron things out.

DancingOnRock 29 Sep 2019
In reply to johnhenderson:

Completion, not competition. 

MG 29 Sep 2019
In reply to DancingOnRock:

> Completion, not competition. 

Compleation, I think you will find!

3
DancingOnRock 29 Sep 2019
In reply to MG:

> Compleation, I think you will find!

What does that mean? Can’t find it with google. Or is it irony that’s gone over my head?

Graeme G 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Deleted bagger:

> So far I've done the Munros, Munro Tops, Firths plus Corbetts. Currently working my way the 2000 footers.

But have you done the deleted tops?

Gordon Stainforth 29 Sep 2019
In reply to DancingOnRock:

Compleat etc was how the word was spelt up to about the end of the eighteenth century, cf. The Compleat Angler. A bit weird to see it used again on UKC in the C21st ...

Post edited at 17:35
petemeads 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Blame the SMC for the antique spelling...

MG 29 Sep 2019
In reply to DancingOnRock:

Sorry, it’s the spelling used when you finish the Munro’s, by long standing tradition.

Deleted bagger 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Graeme G:

> But have you done the deleted tops?

I'm working on it. Got a handful to go. They are well off the beaten track. I seem to be managing about one a year so I could be some time.

Graeme G 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Deleted bagger:

Bet you wish you’d done them when doing the hills first time round? I’m compelled to do them and god they don’t half drive me nuts. No earthly reason to do them, other than they’re on a list which my mates have done!

DancingOnRock 29 Sep 2019
In reply to MG:

Ah. Very good. Thanks. That’s another bit of useless information stuck in my head. 

Deleted bagger 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Graeme G:

> Bet you wish you’d done them when doing the hills first time round? I’m compelled to do them and god they don’t half drive me nuts. No earthly reason to do them, other than they’re on a list which my mates have done!

You're not wrong. There's one which I missed on a winter Mullerdoch round in 1990 which is going to take determined effort to claim. Still, as I'm the only person whose bothered about doing I've only got myself to blame. 

Kevin Woods 29 Sep 2019
In reply to Deleted bagger:

Not Stob Coire Lochan by chance? First time I did that round I was so knackered I missed it out, made sure to get it next time around.

MG 29 Sep 2019
In reply to DancingOnRock:

Now I can’t delete that apostrophe that shouldn’t be there. I blame you😀

DancingOnRock 30 Sep 2019
In reply to MG:

Ha. No. You only get 30mins to edit a post once you’ve submitted it. 

ScraggyGoat 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Deleted bagger:

One would have thought the 'non reporting' tops completions are probably very high, as the group that go on to do them are probably less inclined to write off to record. I don't think doing the tops is that unusual if you are Scottish based and a regular hill-goer, I can think of many friends that have ended up 'ticking' them.

I tagged along on my partners post munro tops round, and the Mullardoch tops figured towards the end; had grand weekend with snow down to loch level, spindrift on the tops, the stags still roaring, in fact one swam the loch to challenge for a group of hinds on the other side. Bizzare to see just a pair of antlers sticking out of the water, looking like a branch moving steadily across the loch. We used sea kayaks (transporting lots of fluff and food) and got back from the head of the loch to the dam in well under two hours.  I must go back as there are old stalkers paths on the south side around Coire Domhain that would make good day out.

Post edited at 14:19
ScottTalbot 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Deleted bagger:

I have to admit, I don't really understand the distinction between Munro's and Munro Tops!? Surely, by bagging a Munro, you've been on the top!?

I know I could Google it...... :-P

2000ers, 3000ers etc much more straightforward!

Lankyman 30 Sep 2019
In reply to ScottTalbot:

> I have to admit, I don't really understand the distinction between Munro's and Munro Tops!?

Think of the Munro as the whole mountain (some of the largest ones are like ranges in their own right). The Tops are subsidiary summits on the range which aren't distinct enough to be considered as Munros in their own right.

Dave Hewitt 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Lankyman:

> Think of the Munro as the whole mountain (some of the largest ones are like ranges in their own right). The Tops are subsidiary summits on the range which aren't distinct enough to be considered as Munros in their own right.

That's the way it's come to be seen in recent years, but strictly speaking, as per the original definition, it's the other way round: all 500-odd things are Tops and 282 of those are also, at present, main summits. When I began in the early 1980s that seemed to be fairly commonly known, but most people now see Munros and Tops as separate lists. Someone asked upthread if anyone had ever been round all the Tops without doing the Munros - that's impossible, but funnily enough the SMC list has (or used to have - I'll check details when I get a minute) someone who was listed for both Munros and Tops (fair enough) but with the Tops year earlier than the Munros year (not fair enough). What used to be quite common - not that doing the full list has ever been a popular sport - was to finish all 500-odd with a final Munro followed by one of the subsidiary Tops on the same day, eg the great William McKnight Docharty did this (Aonach Beag and Stob Coire Bhealaich - that way round, I think - on the last day of May 1948).

Re the overall number of Topists, or whatever they're called, the suggestion upthread of roughly 10% of main-Munro completions is about right, although ScraggyGoat's point about unreported completions of Tops is also true, and might well nudge the percentage up a little - although of course there are heaps of unreported main-Munro rounds too. But it's worth noting that the 10% figure is an overall one, across the whole spread of 130 years of Munroing - in the early days it was higher, up around 25% I think, and these days the figure for any given year is more like 5%. Quite a lot of the people who do repeat main-Munro rounds do one round of Tops but then just "keep it simple". Examples of multiple rounds of Tops are unusual - and Stewart Logan's ten full rounds is rare and remarkable.

Incidentally, re percentages, in terms of what's known roughly one in ten Munroists goes on to complete the Corbetts (almost all Corbetteers are prior Munroists - it's almost always done on a postgrad sort of basis and non-Munroist Corbetteers are thin on the ground - the late Rowland Bowker was one, and I know of a couple more, but it's a small proportion). And roughly one in 20 Munroists goes on to add at least one repeat round. Hope that helps.

ScottTalbot 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Lankyman:

> Think of the Munro as the whole mountain (some of the largest ones are like ranges in their own right). The Tops are subsidiary summits on the range which aren't distinct enough to be considered as Munros in their own right.

Ah! Thanks for the clarification. So, the other tops are what might be considered (south of the border) to not be separate peaks at all, Like Fan Y Big in the Beacons, just on a much grander scale!

Lankyman 30 Sep 2019
In reply to ScottTalbot:

> Ah! Thanks for the clarification. So, the other tops are what might be considered (south of the border) to not be separate peaks at all, Like Fan Y Big in the Beacons, just on a much grander scale!

Not too familiar with the Beacons but in the Lakes there would probably be four Munros plus a very small number of Tops - Helvellyn Lower Man https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2175434 and possibly Symonds Knott (https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6069409 ) come to  mind. I'm not sure if the southern knoll on Skiddaw's summit ridge would count?

Mark Bull 30 Sep 2019
In reply to ScottTalbot:

Confusingly, the list of Furth Munros (in England, Wales and Ireland) does not distinguish between Tops and Main Summits. 

There are 6 in the Lakes: Scafell Pike, Scafell, Ill Crag, Broad Crag, Helvellyn and Skiddaw

Post edited at 17:09
malk 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Completist6503:

do the continentals get as obsessed with the 4000m then 3000m alpine peaks?

wondering if anyone has compleated https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mountains_of_the_Alps_above_3000_m

Post edited at 17:20
Lankyman 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Mark Bull:

> Confusingly, the list of Furth Munros (in England, Wales and Ireland) does not distinguish between Tops and Main Summits. 

> There are 6 in the Lakes: Scafell Pike, Scafell, Ill Crag, Broad Crag, Helvellyn and Skiddaw

Doh! How could I forget the other 'pikes' of Scafell? Especially as Ill Crag is one of the grandest peaks surrounding Eskdale. Sadly, looks don't count (as per many of the less spectacular Munros) and neither Ill nor Broad Crags could ever be regarded as Munros. By my reckoning there are still four English 'Munros' with possibly two, three or four 'Tops' depending on how generous you want to be.

Post edited at 17:29
Dave Hewitt 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Mark Bull:

> There are 6 in the Lakes: Scafell Pike, Scafell, Ill Crag, Broad Crag, Helvellyn and Skiddaw

My pal Gordon Ingall (12000+ Wainwrights plus lots of Scottish stuff) has a good story about Ill Crag or Broad Crag - I forget which - and the common Lakeland navigational technique (spreading to Scotland, I fear) of following other people. He was heading for Scafell Pike a few years ago, but knowing it would be mobbed on top decided to have lunch on one of the lower tops first. It was misty and he was aware of being followed by a group of four blokes, and when he sat down on top of Ill/Broad they duly arrived and one of them demanded to know if this was the top of Scafell Pike. Gordon said no, it's Ill/Broad - at which the bloke became quite annoyed and said "Well, what are we doing here?" Gordon said all four of them looked "quite handy" (he's in his 70s and a gentle soul), so he decided not to get into a debate. Eventually they headed off somewhere into the mist, still annoyed, and Gordon breathed a sigh of relief and carried on with his lunch.

Deleted bagger 30 Sep 2019
In reply to Kevin Woods:

> Not Stob Coire Lochan by chance? First time I did that round I was so knackered I missed it out, made sure to get it next time around.

No. The offending article is Creag a'Chorie Aird on Mullach na Dheiragain. Not sure his I'm going to tackle it. I'll have to give it some thought.

Completist6503 01 Oct 2019
In reply to Completist6503:

Ill claim no 1 .     

NO 1- Ian Simpson UK 3000ers Completist             7 SEP 2019

DaveHK 01 Oct 2019
In reply to Completist6503:

> Is their a completors list yet for this challenge?

Does it not just amount to another 4 or 5 days out? You could easily add it on to your Munros in a week's holiday. In comparison to the Munros or other rounds it doesn't really seem worth recording.

Post edited at 21:57
petestack 01 Oct 2019
In reply to Dan Arkle:

> I presume the Monro Tops is a really big undertaking, unless done in conjunction with your Munros?

It's a much bigger undertaking even done at the same time, but still significantly easier than in Munro's day.

In reply to Toccata:

> Hamish Brown said he didn’t regard you as a compleater until you had done the tops too.

It's what Munro was aiming for and I think an integral part of his vision.

In reply to MG:

> Compleation, I think you will find!

I'm with Robin Campbell in finding that 'twea'!

In reply to Graeme G:

> But have you done the deleted tops?

I have. Didn't want to miss anything that had been listed, so did the lot. Some quite frankly deserved to be deleted, but then some Subsidiary Tops probably still deserve to be Separate Mountains (e.g. the lower Sgurr na Lapaich) and vice versa (Na Gruagaichean, which, impressive as it looks from the West is, dare I say it, logically just a top of Binnein Mor). Cover everything and such distinctions become irrelevant!

2
petemeads 02 Oct 2019
In reply to Completist6503:

How about Hugh Symonds, 1990 for number 1? Not just a compleatist but a continuous traverse of all 303, in 97 days, as detailed in 'Running High' - of which I have a signed copy...

ScraggyGoat 02 Oct 2019

The additional Welsh and English additions are so few, that a great many 'munroists' over the years will have done them incidentally, as a course of just 'getting out'.  I'm sure a huge number of English based 'munroists' over the decades will have done so as the lakes and wales are their 'local' hills, and most English hillgoers that then moved to Scotland and did their munros will have done them as well.  Consequently the likely first 303's is going to be decades ago, certainly well before the 90's.

Dave Hewitt 02 Oct 2019
In reply to ScraggyGoat:

John Rooke Corbett will have been one such person, for sure, as his early work in the Rucksack Club Journal covered the English and Welsh 3000ers, before he moved on to looking at what he called "the Twenty-Fives". His first RCJ piece on this kind of stuff appeared in 1911, I think, and he'll have climbed all the relevant hills as that's what he did (and he was based in Manchester in those days before his move to Bristol). Corbett completed (I'm with Robin and Pete in being anti-"compleat") the main Munros plus the subsidiary Tops with the Buachaille in June 1930, so that was almost certainly him finishing the 303 or whatever the equivalent number was at the time. James Parker was quite possibly the first person to have done it (with Corbett a close second), as he finished main Munros with Ben Hope on 19/7/27 then completed Furths (including Ireland) with Tryfan on 19/4/29.

As the Scraggy one says, there'll have been lots of such people historically, especially as one is only looking at Scotland+England+Wales and excluding Ireland. Colin Dodgson will have done it, possibly when he wrapped up his Munros and Tops on Mull in Oct 1951, and his unlisted sidekick Tim Tyson is pretty likely too. There'll have been lots of others, eg John Dow finished Munros with Beinn na Lap on 4/6/33 and Furths somewhere in Ireland on 1/10/56 - so that's three of the first five listed Munroists, for starters. Anne Littlejohn might well have been the first woman to do it (although if Molly Fitzgibbon did complete the Munros - we'll probably never know for sure - then she might well have done the 303 earlier given that she was based in Windermere.)

Simon Caldwell 02 Oct 2019
In reply to Dave Hewitt:

I finished the Munros in 2016 but did the English/Welsh summits decades before that. I think pretty much everyone I know who is ticking Munros has already done the England and Wales hills as well for the reasons ScraggyGoat gives. If you add the Irish furths then that total drops to roughly zero ;-)

Iain Thow 03 Oct 2019
In reply to Deleted bagger:

Do it from a camp in Glen Elchaig, then you can carry on up Ceathramhnan and down the Stuc Mor/Beag ridge. Makes a great loop, not too epic, and Creag a' Choire Aird (which was called the NE top of Creag a' Choire Aird when it was an undeleted top) is only a very minor detour.

And you can pick up the Elchaig Grahams on the same trip if you haven't got round to them yet.


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