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Snowdonia Mountains now SHUT...

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
 Sl@te Head 25 Mar 2020
 wercat 25 Mar 2020
In reply to Sl@te Head:

Well that has set a precedent for 2020, like 2001!  Lakes Next?

2
Northern Star 25 Mar 2020
In reply to Sl@te Head:

I can perfectly understand not wanting visitors traveling from afar to walk in the mountains, but this is such a shame for local people who can access these areas perfectly easily on foot.  Getting up in the hills is probably essential for the mental health and well being of many during these difficult times, finding the solitude and space they need to put their difficulties into perspective. 

I wonder if the Snowdonia Park Authority could not have supported local people in this respect but unfortunately I guess the unintended consequences of this will mean that the remaining open parks, beaches, green spaces etc. will just become busier - making it slightly more difficult to keep a reasonable distance from other people.  I sincerely hope that this (seemingly) knee-jerk reaction does not cause negative consequences further down the line.

10
 olddirtydoggy 25 Mar 2020
In reply to Sl@te Head:

I don't blame them as too many can't be trusted. I wonder what action they can take if somebody ignored the new restrictions? There's always one.

In reply to olddirtydoggy:

I suppose that'll depend what mechanism they've used to close them, being public rights of way?  They can close the access land easily enough as that's effectively permissive.  I guess a byelaw?

Edit: Ah, the Welsh Government have made a law:

"The closures ensure that park authorities are complying with the "Health Protection (Coronavirus: Closure of Leisure Businesses, Footpaths and Access Land) (Wales) Regulations 2020" introduced by Welsh Government this week."

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/wsi/2020/334/regulation/4/made

Not sure if there's an English equivalent so the Lakes/Peak may not be able to.

Notably it says they *have* to, not that they *can*!

Post edited at 18:20
 gezebo 25 Mar 2020
In reply to Sl@te Head:

Well some are. I think it’s also aimed at people bringing their campervans etc and also to allow the closure of campsites etc. 
 

Maps need to be made showing where the restrictions are in place. I hope it’s not a sledgehammer approach to cracking a nut and it does seem a little copy and paste from foot and mouth. 
 

In reply to wercat:

Wales rushed through legislation to enable the closure of access land and rights of way if deemed to be a risk which might be what was used here. Nothing similar in England yet. 

 Tom V 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Northern Star:

>  Getting up in the hills is probably essential for the mental health and well being of many during these difficult times, 

No, it's probably not. Time we gave this one a rest.

19
 Al Randall 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Tom V:

I'm not questioning the logic of banning travel but stopping people going into countryside areas whilst thousands of others, in the worst effected areas, continue to cram together on tubes and buses seems a little odd.

Al

3
 Tom V 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Al Randall:

That's not what I was talking about. It's the notion that access to the hills is an essential without which people will descend into mental illness. It's been touted about on here for well over a fortnight now  and it's part of the mindset which thinks that climbers and hillwalkers are different from other people and should therefore have special dispensations.

If getting into the hills is such an essential that you can't get by without it because of the mental suffering its absence will cause then , like an alcoholic or a gambler,  you have already got serious  dependency issues  which need addressing fairly urgently.

The same applies if you can't live without fishing or riding a motor-bike etc etc.

18
 gezebo 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Al Randall:

The council here have closed beaches, footpaths etc. Trying to prevent being going out.  One local councillor is asking for the army to be brought in too. In the meantime people are being forced into o walk on roads with no footpaths etc. Bins are being sealed up and bin collections reduced and delayed with recycling centres closed. Fly tipping has increased markedly. It seems they want people to stay at home but reduce to infrastructure to keep them safe and hygienic at home.
 

There was talk of teachers preparing work for pupils and I know one pupil (yr8) yesterday had a 15min group chat with a teacher who said that in two weeks they’ll be set a couple of ‘tasks’ each week. 
 

In the meantime council have just issued their yearly demands with what I believe is a 7% increase. 

3
In reply to Northern Star:

I would have thought those living in the Snowdonia NP area were pretty well catered for with countryside walks without having to actually venture up mountains and into somewhat  more remote areas. Thus solitude and a sense of isolation are readily available. 

In reply to gezebo:

>  with recycling centres closed. Fly tipping has increased markedly. It seems they want people to stay at home but reduce to infrastructure to keep them safe and hygienic at home. <

Quite a lot of garden bonfires during day near me (SW london)

> There was talk of teachers preparing work for pupils and I know one pupil (yr8) yesterday had a 15min group chat with a teacher who said that in two weeks they’ll be set a couple of ‘tasks’ each week. <

My son has been teaching via Zoom at pupils' request since the lockdown. However he finds it almost impossible to enforce homework.

 Dave the Rave 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Sl@te Head:

A shame for the locals that is.

I can’t see the sense in it really.

Hopefully it’s not been instigated by some jealous git who can’t access the hills without a longish drive and has shoved the ball up their jumper.

7
 Al Randall 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Sl@te Head:

I would be interested to know, especially from those encouraging such extreme measures, how long do you think it's sustainable for?

Al 

Post edited at 17:58
1
 gezebo 04 Apr 2020
In reply to earlsdonwhu:

> I would have thought those living in the Snowdonia NP area were pretty well catered for with countryside walks without having to actually venture up mountains and into somewhat  more remote areas. Thus solitude and a sense of isolation are readily available. 

They would be except some councils are being very over zealous in trying to shut down all country side areas. 

 gezebo 04 Apr 2020
In reply to oldie:

I’m glad that your son is at least trying to engage with the pupils. My little ones have had nothing bar being sent home with some plain and squared paper. My other half has had nothing from the primary school for hers and only the 15min group chat for ok the high school. I fear that the impact of no real education or social contact will be very detrimental in the long term for them. 

In reply to gezebo:

I reckon the loss of a term or two will make barely any difference, to be honest.

If schools have to be closed longer than that, I reckon the Government will step in with a stronger plan on a national basis, such as work based on reinstated Schools programmes on TV (which I used to love watching when I was off sick!)

Post edited at 18:10
 Philb1950 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Al Randall:

Went for a 3 hr walk from home yesterday with the dogs. Didn’t see a soul until we entered the village again.People were out legitimately but so many in a small village, we were all dodging each other. Can anybody explain to me, with a reasoned argument, that what I did was wrong, although most certainly not illegal. 

3
 Amine head 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Philb1950:

Absolutely  nothing. 

2
 kevin stephens 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Philb1950:

Assuming you’ve only posted on UKC not too much as the number of people upset and envious of your fortunate location shouldn’t be excessive 

In reply to gezebo:

> The council here have closed beaches, footpaths etc.

Where is this? Do they have the right to do this?

4
 Tom V 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Philb1950:

That's fine until the entire population thinks "What's good enough for Philb is good enough for me ! F* ck the guidelines, I'm off out for 3 hours"

No man is an island.

13
 gezebo 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Neil Williams:

I’m not sure. Social isolation for younger children, particularly those that are only children could be quite significant. If they don’t go back until September- which seems possible then that’s 6 months of social development and learning lost.

Deadeye 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Philb1950:

Almost certainly fine, but depends where you went to be honest.  People picking shades of grey doesn't really help the overall effort.  So maybe best to not publicise it?

Post edited at 18:52
1
In reply to Deadeye:

> So maybe best to not publicise it?

In these days where everyone has a platform to share their opinion, some people are taking a long time to learn that sometimes it's better to say nothing.  It's at the root of a fair few unnecessary disagreements.

T.

Deadeye 04 Apr 2020
 GrahamD 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Al Randall:

Not as odd as allowing car loads to travel away from the most affected areas to potentially come into contact with others from less infected areas

 Al Randall 04 Apr 2020
In reply to GrahamD:

Yes that's why I mentioned that I understood the logic of the travel restrictions.

 gezebo 04 Apr 2020
In reply to Mark Kemball:

A few areas across Conwy council area in addition to the honeypot areas in the Park. Eg around Conwy were barriers have been put up. The farmers union are also in the press talking about the threat to farmers posed by walkers although around here you only ever see them buzzing around on quad bikes. 
 

Gwynedd and Anglesey locals are also up in arms about the ‘influx’ of tourists which is not being helped by county councillors fueling the fire requesting the military set up road blocks but the roads- A55, A5 and others are absolutely dead around here (North Gwynedd). 

 Roadrunner6 05 Apr 2020
In reply to GrahamD:

> Not as odd as allowing car loads to travel away from the most affected areas to potentially come into contact with others from less infected areas

The main reason for the travel bans or not overwhelming resources/NHS at that location.

The UK has not done enough testing to have any confidence where the disease is - locals seem to wrongly assume it is not in their community..

COVID19 has a 10% mortality rate according to the data in the UK, which we know means they are missing about 10 times that number of cases because it should be about a 1% mortality rate, probably lower.

 Roadrunner6 05 Apr 2020
In reply to gezebo:

TBF to teachers, as a teacher, we are trying to teach, and be full time parents. I'm teaching with a 4 year old daughter, 2 new borns and a wife who just had a C-section and of course don't have paternity leave. But plenty of other teachers will be at home with their kids.

Our kids normally have 4 x 75 minute blocks a day. They now have 4 x 45 minutes but we don't have to be on zoom for 45 minutes, just at least 15 minutes per class to set the work. We are still being paid because we are still paying out mortgages etc.

It won't be perfect at all. It's not normally home schooling at all. At best we just have to prevent regression and have some moving forwards.

 Tim Davies 05 Apr 2020
In reply to gezebo:

Conwy, Llandudno, A55 all deserted yesterday. You can play “spot the car” on the A55 webcams. 

 

 galpinos 05 Apr 2020
In reply to gezebo:

> There was talk of teachers preparing work for pupils and I know one pupil (yr8) yesterday had a 15min group chat with a teacher who said that in two weeks they’ll be set a couple of ‘tasks’ each week. 

That's pretty poor. I have one in Yr2 and one in the school nursery and they only got sent home with an exercise book and mini whiteboard but have been sent a worksheet for both weeks via a website/app the school use. For Yr2 it has English, maths, geography, science, Big Question/PE tasks and we get sent daily challenges and updates from the teachers about what they and other pupils have been doing.

The teachers have done far more than I thought they would/could and I've been very impressed with the entire school team.

Even after two weeks, my two are struggling with not being able to see their friends. They are a very sociable pair and zoom play dates are quite cutting it. It'd be a lot harder on them if they didn't have each other though.

In reply to gezebo:

But even walking on the lanes in Snowdonia or Exmoor etc gives you a greater sense of isolation and rurality than  side roads in Manchester.

 gezebo 05 Apr 2020
In reply to earlsdonwhu:

I’d completely agree and if you live in urban areas it must be very difficult. I suppose part of my point is that the councils are being quite overzealous in areas which is now forcing people to walk on lanes etc not designed for pedestrians which have increased in numbers and now putting them in conflict with cars, tractors, cyclists, lorries. Etc. 

2
In reply to earlsdonwhu:

A sense of it - but I've been running locally around Bletchley (typical Barratt-box suburbia) and it's been dead quiet - people *actually are* staying at home.

If I was in London I'd be looking to run in places like the City and Oxford Street - they'll be dead.

Post edited at 12:45

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