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Lakes soil erosion

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 Toerag 21 Jan 2020

Interesting article on the Beeb today:-

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-51183134

Is the erosion confined to grazed areas or is it all over the place e.g. 'our' paths?

 glilje 21 Jan 2020

Here's your ignorant comment for the day:

They say it will lead to more exposed rock faces on the fells, more climbing coming to the lakes!

 Lankyman 21 Jan 2020
In reply to Toerag:

There are lots of places quite high up in the fells where trees have been planted in recent years. Some I've come across are at the head of Wet Sleddale, Upper Eskdale, Long Sleddale and other odd spots. Presumably this is an attempt to combat soil erosion. It does seem apparent to me that erosion scars have become more obvious in recent years after some of the big weather events, gullies and bog bursts I mean rather than paths per se.

 ianstevens 21 Jan 2020
In reply to Toerag:

Do you even need to ask this question? Some of the paths in the lakes are horrendous erosion scars.

 ian caton 21 Jan 2020
In reply to ianstevens:

Not like they used to be. Going up to pavey ark was like climbing a gravel pit. 

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 biggianthead 21 Jan 2020
In reply to Toerag:

I've not seen any significant change over the last 40 years.  Except footpaths where the National Trust/Lake District National Park encourage tourism . Get off the beaten track nothing changed.

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 Lankyman 22 Jan 2020
In reply to biggianthead:

> I've not seen any significant change over the last 40 years.  Except footpaths where the National Trust/Lake District National Park encourage tourism . Get off the beaten track nothing changed.


Are you looking? There are lots of places where erosion is becoming increasingly a problem. Look at this https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1957307 taken in July 2010.

Those fresh scars weren't there on my previous visit the year before. Take a look at this photo of the same dale head in June 2006 https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/594902

I've come across this kind of feature elsewhere in the Lakes and other places in northern England where I walk often enough to notice change.

 John Kelly 22 Jan 2020
In reply to Lankyman:

https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1957307 31

They are, I think, caused by hydraulic pressure during intense rainfall events 

https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/binaries/content/assets/metofficegovuk/pdf/weather/learn-about/uk-past-events/interesting/2009/heavy-rainfall_flooding-in-the-lake-district-cumbria---november-2009---met-office.pdf

There is a big one in Langdale (mickleden), appeared overnight during storm desmond, soil in big blocks, bit like avalanche debris, pushed off the base by water pressure from the slope above, natural phenomena - I think

Post edited at 17:27
 Jim Lancs 22 Jan 2020
In reply to John Kelly:

. . .  appeared overnight during storm desmond, soil in big blocks, bit like avalanche debris, pushed off the base by water pressure from the slope above, natural phenomena - I think

Yes I went out immediately after Desmond and after the storm in 2009. These features on many slopes were the thing that struck me most. Some were still 'active' with huge amounts of water erupting from the ground.

In reply to biggianthead:

Maybe ask the prof about his data/research? I doubt if he's talking nonsense 

 pasbury 26 Jan 2020
In reply to Toerag:

An impression I have from living in the lakes, albeit 25 years ago is that the hills were covered in very short turf because there were so many sheep. Now as I hillwalk mainly in Wales the turf has been replaced with a far more varied, tussocky flora. There are hills where the short turf still exists, on the Black Mountains and especially lower places like the Begwyns.

I think it’s sheep. And let’s not forget that sheep are essentially a heavily subsidised nostalgic decoration on our uplands.

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