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Lakes 3000s by teenager

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
 Guy Hurst 03 Mar 2020

My 16-year-old son has been talking about doing the Lakes 3000s for a year or so and has now found a similarly energetic friend, a year younger, also keen to do it this summer. My son has been out hill walking with me since I was carrying him on my back. He's a dance student, goes to the gym several times a week, enjoys mountain biking and bouldering when he has the time and avoids eating stuff containing refined sugar (he even reads the ingredient labels on what he buys), so he's very fit — annoyingly so when he speeds off ahead of me. He's a decent navigator, although not as good as he thinks he is, and has been up Skiddaw, Helvellyn, Scafell and Scafell Pike on various trips with me.

I can't see many serious objections to letting him have a go at this, so was wondering if anybody else can think of any major problems, or has any tips to give. Cheers all.

In reply to Guy Hurst:

Well, there's the obvious one for a young lad; being quick for a bit isn't the same as being able to keep going all day (and it will be all day).  So a few days out building both the ability to keep on going and then being confident about it would help.  Happily, this can be combined with the second tip, which is . . .

You go with greater confidence if you've been over the ground before.  So in order to build that all-day stamina, get him and his mates to walk over what they're going to take on in sections first, combined with other hills.  Ambleside to Keswick via Fairfield, Helvellyn and the ridge north of there.  Then Grasmere, Helvellyn, Skiddaw to Keswick.  Wasdale Head to Keswick via the Scafell group, Gable, Honister and the ridge west of Derwent Water.  Shap to the ODG via High Street, Patterdale, Grisedale and the Langdale Pikes.  Langdale horseshoe from Grasmere.  And others.

Which should keep him out of mischief for a bit.  Then plan on organising a bit of support, a point or two where you can be waiting with food and drink, wait for decent weather and the long daylight hours of June and off he goes. 

T.

1
 Bloodfire 03 Mar 2020
In reply to Guy Hurst:

He seems more sensible than most people I know... and probably fitter too. I'd say put a few measures in place to ensure their safety (communication, emergency procedures etc) but other than that, let them explore, get lost, find their way and make their own adventure. Seems like a perfect way to grow up. Sounds like a top kid and some top parenting. 

 jezzah 03 Mar 2020
In reply to Guy Hurst:

Great- go for it. Should be a great adventure for a couple of 16 year olds.

 dsiska 03 Mar 2020
In reply to Guy Hurst:

If he's spent enough time in similar hills and had few full-day walking / climbing trips then he'll be fine.

The usual stuff: carry spare enough snacks for a day (even those with sugar) and then some to spare, carry full waterproofs even if the forecast is good, carry a bivy / survival bag, headtorch, whistle. If the weather deteriorates then the aim is to get down but not at any cost (i.e. don't end up going down some random crags since you could fall). Have charged mobile (consider a battery pack, most places in the Lakes have reception these days). 

Have fun! 

In reply to Guy Hurst:

> ... so was wondering if anybody else can think of any major problems, or has any tips to give.

The tip is to just leave him too it!    Don't try to plan it for him.  If he doesn't get round he'll learn for next time. 

After all, presuming this'll be in the summer, he's unlikely to die of exposure.    

 Mark Eddy 03 Mar 2020
In reply to Guy Hurst:

I've taken a few families with teenagers on this route. It has always worked well as the youngsters have been fit and able. Plenty of snacks to keep them going and keep spirits high is a must.

Worth waiting for a weather window, the Scafell in particular are pretty grim when weather is rough up high.

But defo let him go for it

Deadeye 03 Mar 2020
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

Great.  he'll have a lovely time.  Your only job is collection at the end.  Don't be tempted to interfere

 Mick Bradshaw 04 Mar 2020
In reply to Guy Hurst:

Maybe some occasional text messages to let you know their whereabouts (eg from key summits or when moving from one massif to another) so if he was to need any help you would know roughly where to start.

2
 abr1966 04 Mar 2020
In reply to Coel Hellier:

> The tip is to just leave him too it!    Don't try to plan it for him.  If he doesn't get round he'll learn for next time. 

> After all, presuming this'll be in the summer, he's unlikely to die of exposure.    

Its not often that I agree with Coel 100% but this is the crux of it!

I was backpacking with mates from 15....end of what is now called year 10 we walked virtually the whole of the lake district....even got served in the Travellers Rest in Glenridding and the Fish Inn!

In reply to Guy Hurst:

Not sure about the advice not to ‘interfere’ -  I did it on my own when I was 17, and I didn’t object to some ground support from my parents. I’d say talk to him and see what he wants, but in general, good Lord, why ever not?

jcm


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