UKH

Small Wood Stove

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 ImperialJohn 14 Apr 2021

Can anyone recommend a small lightweight wood burning stove.

I wanted something for boiling/cooking but can also provide a small amount of heat in the tent at night.
 

Everything I looked at so far sends to be geared more to cooking and is very open. I was hoping to find something very small where you can regulate the oxygen getting in. Something more sealed and contained that I can have within my tent for a little bit of warmth without catching fire to everything. 

The stuff the Canucks and Yanks class as ultralight weights three or four pounds plus. 😂
 

 plyometrics 14 Apr 2021
In reply to ImperialJohn:

Not sure you want to be burning anything in your tent. 

 Lankyman 14 Apr 2021
In reply to plyometrics:

> Not sure you want to be burning anything in your tent. 

Yes. Also consider the possibility of carbon monoxide fumes from burning or smouldering?

 deepsoup 14 Apr 2021
In reply to plyometrics:

I'd be a bit wary about anything where "you can regulate the oxygen getting in" too, on account of how a limited supply of oxygen getting in might mean carbon monoxide instead of carbon dioxide coming out.

A couple of rather grim cautionary tales:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-21059594
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-33976414

 plyometrics 14 Apr 2021
In reply to Lankyman:

That was my immediate thought!

In reply to plyometrics:

Indeed.  If you want "heating" in your tent a hot water bottle and a stove to heat the water (outside!) is the way to go.

You can get tents designed for a stove, of course.

In reply to ImperialJohn:

Unless it's a proper tent stove, with a chimney, and your tent is designed to accommodate a chimney, don't do it.

 petegunn 14 Apr 2021
In reply to ImperialJohn:

Go outdoors sell a Denali Tent Stove but are 11kg, they have an area to put your pan or kettle

 Lankyman 14 Apr 2021
In reply to petegunn:

> Go outdoors sell a Denali Tent Stove but are 11kg, they have an area to put your pan or kettle

Handy if the OP has a packhorse or a Sherpa!

In reply to ImperialJohn:

Just make a circle of rocks on the groundsheet and build your fire in that. The rocks should stop it spreading too far.

3
 jimtitt 14 Apr 2021
In reply to ImperialJohn:

Small wood stoves are a pain in the ass, you spend most of your life snapping twigs and poking them in which for cooking is problematic. Light stoves burn through quickly, are erratic burning and retain no heat.

Getting the right chimney diameter is a hassle as is sufficient height to get good draw and not smoke out the rest of the world. You need a spark arrestor on the top unless the tent is canvas and the chimney tall (and probably still want one). The tar droplets look like shit and are irremovable. The exit through the tent is an expensive hassle (or you cut a larger hole and sew in a Nomex panel).

Charcoal is better than wood but you still need a chimney and the stoves are heavier as the grate has to cope with higher temperatures.

 toad 14 Apr 2021
In reply to ImperialJohn:

"What kind of tent do you have" is probably a more important question than "What kind of stove"

If it isn't designed for a stove, forget it! Too risky for CO, too much chance of an actual fire.

I have a very heavy eldfell woodburner for a tentipi. Both designed for each other from low vents to chimney standoff. And I still use a CO alarm

 nniff 16 Apr 2021
In reply to ImperialJohn:

"Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day, but set that man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life."

 HowlingGael 16 Apr 2021
In reply to ImperialJohn:

As others have said, you don't want a wood burner in your tent unless it has a chimney. (so not an ultralight option!)

I have used Tea light candles in the porch of a backpacking tent in the winter and one of them will make a surprising amount of difference. You do need to be very careful though and not be tempted to use it in the tent itself. I always leave the fly zip open a bit to allow airflow.

I used to fill a Sigg water bottle with hot water last thing, put the bottle inside a sock (a great way to dry out damp socks you will need the next day) and use it as a hot water bottle. The water will be cool in the morning but will still give you a head start making that vital first brew.

On the whole a lightweight gas stove or a jetboil might be a better, more versatile option but whatever you decide is your call so have fun and take care.

 Philip 16 Apr 2021
In reply to ImperialJohn:

youtube.com/watch?v=QeHGDr81XwM&

As other have said, CO is your enemy. Heating with exhaust gases is the wrong way to go, you want a heat exchanger to swap harmful hot air for harmless.

Or just stop being such a sissy. :-P 


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