/ REVIEW: Jöttnar Asger Jacket

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Striking a catalogue pose while inadvertently accessorising with my hat... There's a trend at present for hybrid softshells that combine a wind resistant outer with a fleecy inner. The Asger must be one of the lightest - and that makes it ideal for active use, says Dan Bailey. But is the fit suited to climbing?

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James123 13 Nov 2019
In reply to UKC/UKH Gear:

Steep price for a wind shell with a pile fleece. Power grid fleece with a separate wind shell is far more versatile IMO. 

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In reply to James123:

Jottnar seem to be plumbing the depths of how unnecessarily complicated and therefore expensive you can make a fleece. Sorry, I should say "technically sophisticated jacket" 

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TobyA 13 Nov 2019
In reply to purplemonkeyelephant:

Aren't they just doing what I think Rab, Mountain Equipment, Montane and probably others have done in the last few winters of offering a Polartec Alpha insulated jacket with the lining removed? When people stopped using Alpha between two layers a few years ago I could see the logic, but did think basically it was reinventing Buffalo shirts once again.

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In reply to TobyA:

Did you know Polartec Alpha was developed for Special Operations Forces? £195 for a lightweight fleece made in the far east. 

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Flashman38 14 Nov 2019
In reply to UKC/UKH Gear:

It`s difficult to heat up Polartec Alpha when only 45g/m weight.

For the runners only surely.

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HeMa 14 Nov 2019
In reply to TobyA:

> ...of offering a Polartec Alpha insulated jacket with the lining removed? 

I was under the expression that Alpha had always been offered sans lining (and it is not really a fleece). At least all the alpha-apparel I have, have not had a lining (Marmot something, like 5 or so years ago... and now a Lowe Alpine and OR jackets).

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HeMa 14 Nov 2019
In reply to Flashman38:

> It`s difficult to heat up Polartec Alpha when only 45g/m weight.

> For the runners only surely.

I guess you haven't really used one...

The two jackets I have are more than adequate for -15 to -20 deg C ice climbs fests with a thin wool under layer (and if needed water & wind repellent top layer). Sure a belay jacket is handy at those temps... but that's what everyone has... warmer temps (think around -5 deg C), the alpha is enough.

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TobyA 14 Nov 2019
In reply to purplemonkeyelephant:

> Did you know Polartec Alpha was developed for Special Operations Forces? 

Yep. I was never quite sure how all that body armour and webbing full of ammo didn't squash it. When it first came out about five years ago that seemed to be the big selling point! Can't say I was particularly convinced. I reviewed Marmot's first alpha jacket and it was sweaty and not very well cut as I remember it. http://lightfromthenorth.blogspot.com/2014/02/marmot-isotherm-hoodypolartec-alpha.html

On price, well some people are prepared to pay that. If you want something similar but a bit cheaper Rab's version is 50 quid less. 

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TobyA 14 Nov 2019
In reply to HeMa:

Definitely the first season it came out everything was lined, it was very much sold a super breathable synthetic insulation - but because it was knitted they could have super breathable liners (Marmot used something that had lots of holes in it, that seemed quite sensible). It might have been Rab or Montane who first sold a jacket with no lining and that seemed to work so have caught on with UK companies at least.

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HeMa 14 Nov 2019
In reply to TobyA:

Maybe... can't remember and as I don't have the Marmot Isotherm pullover anymore, can't really say.

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James123 14 Nov 2019
In reply to TobyA:

Any concerns of durability of alpha direct from washing, use under a pack etc? compared to Rab VR lite or Marmot driclime with there micro pile that doesn't seem anywhere near as fragile. 

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