Loading Notifications...

Go Outdoors Going into Administration

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
 leon 1 21 Jun 2020
Report
 henwardian 21 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Crickey. Glad my new rucksac arrived on Friday. Guess my discount card won't be that useful going forward though!

Report
 toad 21 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Bugger. Does that mean ultimate outdoors as well?

Report
 kevin stephens 21 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Oh No!

Does that mean we will have to fall back on our local independent climbing shops and have to put up with the extra overheads of things like exceptional customer service?

Report
 spenser 21 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

I probably buy 90% of my stuff from independents but Go are useful for picking up bits and bobs before trips in the ready that Outside etc aren't for those of us who live in places like Derby. 

Report
 gman2012 21 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

I think it's a sign that no one has been buying outdoor gear in Spring/Summer 2020 and this is just the first.

Report
 timjones 21 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

> Oh No!

> Does that mean we will have to fall back on our local independent climbing shops and have to put up with the extra overheads of things like exceptional customer service?

That is fine if you have a local independent climbing shop.

Report
 d_b 21 Jun 2020
In reply to timjones:

Also, there's no incentive to provide exceptional customer service if there is no competition. I'm sure we all remember specialist shops that treated their customers like morons and thought they were doing people a favour by serving them.

Sometimes bring a faceless company is a competitive advantage.

Report
 kevin stephens 21 Jun 2020
In reply to timjones:

> That is fine if you have a local independent climbing shop.

Many of them have a prompt and very good mail order service 

Report
 afx22 21 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

In reply to kevin stephens:

Mail order can be very useful but it’s not so good if you want to work out what size you need or compare clothing materials.

While Go Outdoors have not been at their best for a few years, this is a shame, especially for those who will likely loose their jobs.  It’s not a good sign for the industry as a whole.

Report
In reply to gman2012:

> I think it's a sign that no one has been buying outdoor gear in Spring/Summer 2020 and this is just the first.

Could also be a sign of a large corporation focusing on profit, expecting a dip in the market and would rather refocus on something else. That’s all assuming they were doing fine until now. JD is owned by Pentland Group (58%) which owns a number of brands. Go Outdoors has only been acquired 4 years ago anyway. 
 

Would it be a different matter for an independent business or outdoor focused corporation? No idea. 

Report
In reply to kevin stephens:

> Many of them have a prompt and very good mail order service 

Once you go to non-local shop (online), you compete with a number of shops which arguably can offer lower prices. 

Report
 gman2012 21 Jun 2020
In reply to PPP:

> Would it be a different matter for an independent business or outdoor focused corporation? No idea. 

Well, we're going to find out.

Report
 timjones 21 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

> Many of them have a prompt and very good mail order service 

What happened to the local part of your ideals?

Mail order is all well and good if you know exactly what you want, if you need to see the goods the local wins the day and if that is Go Outdoors then so be it.

Report
 kevin stephens 21 Jun 2020
In reply to timjones:

I was replying to those people who don’t have a local shop, they still have the benefit of supporting a specialised retailer , for example with expert personal advice over the phone if not face to face. Try phoning Go Outdoors to discuss the respective merits of different camping stoves or crampons 

Report
In reply to leon 1:

I believe a "pre pack" is planned, so it'll just involve the closure of the unprofitable stores.

Report
 Beanmanclimb 21 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

It's been downhill since JD took over.

Report
 kevin stephens 21 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Gone Outdoors 

Report
 LastBoyScout 21 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Interesting - I walked past the Reading branch on Friday, but my wife wouldn't let me go in, as too much else to do.

I thought they might have been ok with lots of walkers/bikers/etc buying online for lockdown activities.

Report
 girlymonkey 21 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

Local independent shops? Not round here! I get specialist advice from online sources and then find the kit online. You send it back if it doesn't fit. Has long been the case, will continue to be the case! 

Go outdoors was useful for it's price match promise, and I sometimes took the dog in for a wander on a rainy day for a change. Was more inclined to go there than Tiso. 

I'm not very sad though, internet shopping is much simpler. It's all well and good saying you want to try things in shops, but you can't try it if the shop doesn't have it. So you trek for half an hour to a shop, find they don't have it and then still have to go and get it online! 

Report
 timjones 21 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

I don't have to phone them I can pop into a local store, see rhe goods and talk to a member of staff.

The merits of independent start to pale when they are offering nationwide mail order IMO.

Report
 GrahamD 22 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

> Oh No!

> Does that mean we will have to fall back on our local independent climbing shops and have to put up with the extra overheads of things like exceptional customer service?

Funnily enough, I don't have one of those, and in any case, I've not been in one that stocks large bottles of Camping Gaz.

Report
 S.Kew 22 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

I wouldn’t be surprised if Mike Ashley at Sports direct buys part or all of the company. Sports Direct already stocks climbing gear (On website), mountain biking, outdoor clothing etc. With climbing increasing in popularity, we may start to see climbing gear stocked in Sports direct shops soon and not just on-line. 

Report
 Lemony 22 Jun 2020
In reply to S.Kew:

Climbing is surely a minuscule part of what GoOutdoors do? In terms of their stock holding in every shop I've been to it must be well under 1% and in terms of what they actually sell, significantly less than that.

I always assumed GO only stocked climbing stuff at all because a. it had a long shelf life* and b. it makes good window dressing to make the place look more credible.

Online that's basically an irrelevance.

*You regularly find stuff on the shelves that haven't been in production for years.

Report
 Alex_Handhold 22 Jun 2020
In reply to S.Kew:

Yep. I feel sorry for the employees but we shouldn't feel bad for the company. JD have the cash to keep GoOutdoors afloat but clearly don't deem it a viable or worthwhile business anymore. This is excellent news for independent stores that have been struggling to compete for years 

Report
 GrahamD 22 Jun 2020
In reply to Alex_Handhold:

>This is excellent news for independent stores that have been struggling to compete for years 

Like Decathlon,  you mean ?

Report
 gman2012 22 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

I've bought rock shoes at GO the last couple of years, they had all their stock piled next to some comfy chairs and a small climbing wall so you could grab a few boxes, try a few out and use your smartphone for info. 

Most of the floorspace seemed to be hillwalking/camping gear which I suppose has been the hardest hit.

Report
 galpinos 22 Jun 2020
In reply to toad:

Isn't that a Blacks' "brand"?

Report
 gman2012 22 Jun 2020
 galpinos 22 Jun 2020
In reply to gman2012:

Cheers, didn't realise that.

Report
 Doug 22 Jun 2020
 AukWalk 22 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Got some stuff I need to return - hopefully be able to do that today! :O

Overall think it might be a good thing for outdoor shops long term. Go Outdoors seems to have been dominating the market and taking customers from other shops (although maybe that's a misconception on my part given what's happening!) while providing an increasingly poor offering since the takeover.

Do have a browse in the local one sometimes, but the product range really isn't that great any more tbh. At least decathlon's still going if I do want to grab some cheap own-brand outdoor stuff.

Report
 S.Kew 22 Jun 2020
In reply to Lemony:

Yeah. Go outdoors stocks a good range of climbing gear, but not huge.
their departments all seem the same size for things like fishing, cycling, climbing etc. Think camping is their main thing. 
Mike Ashley has a history of buying struggling firms for cheap. A very shrewd business man. Ruthless though. He may just buy stock from Go outdoors and put it into his Sports direct shops. He has done this with other shops that were entering administration. 
Go outdoors won’t be the last big shop to enter administration though. With these big stores having huge commercial building rents and very little revenue, more will surely follow. 

Report
In reply to girlymonkey:

> Local independent shops? Not round here! I get specialist advice from online sources and then find the kit online. You send it back if it doesn't fit. Has long been the case, will continue to be the case! 

> Go outdoors was useful for it's price match promise, and I sometimes took the dog in for a wander on a rainy day for a change. Was more inclined to go there than Tiso. 

> I'm not very sad though, internet shopping is much simpler. It's all well and good saying you want to try things in shops, but you can't try it if the shop doesn't have it. So you trek for half an hour to a shop, find they don't have it and then still have to go and get it online! 

That, and my local running shop can’t even filter by shoe size. There were 9 shoes of a particular brand, the filtering panel shows 4 in my size, you select that size and it still shows 9 shoes... I reported it them. 

Why would I pay £90 instead of £60 for the same shoe if the buying experience is so bad? Sure, going to a shop and getting them fitted is a bonus... but I could also order 4 pairs in total and return 2-3 pairs if they didn’t fit. 
 

The online-first businesses handle this so much better. 

Report
 Martin W 22 Jun 2020

I think it'll be a shame if this means that their Calibre brand of MTBs will disappear.  They seemed to have decent, well-thought-out products at price points that challenged the major brands and other retailers.

Have to say I didn't use them very much, though.  I've never bought any climbing gear from them.  Apart from a couple of rucksacks in sales it's just been the occasional bit of outdoor clothing and a few odds and sods like water bottles and maps.

I wonder how much the emergence of Decathlon in the UK market hurt them?

If it does turn out to be a pre-pack and they just rationalise and keep going then at least there will still be stores to browse in.

I'm with girlymonkey in finding that Tiso, despite having a bit of cachet associated with the name, seems to manage to be uninspiring as a retail destination.  It often seems indistinguishable from Cotswold Outdoor.  And their choice of what items to stock (or not) from the different manufacturers sometimes seems a tad perverse.  But maybe that's part of their problem: they don't/can't go for the big store approach and stock practically everything from every manufacturer, at least in Edinburgh (I think the Leith "Outdoor Experience" store actually has less floorspace then Rose Street, especially now that Alpine Bikes have a chunk of it).  And they've been disappointingly slow to get the shops open as lockdown has stared to ease (cf Decathlon & Go Outdoors) possibly again due to space constraints meaning that they can't put social distancing measures in place.  I wouldn't be surprised to see Tiso group undergoing a bit of a shake up fairly soon.

Report
 girlymonkey 22 Jun 2020
In reply to PPP:

And try finding a range of options to try on in a bricks and mortar shop, particularly small shops, if you are not a 5 foot 10, size M bloke! It's not commercially viable to stock a range of things for anyone who is not "average".

I tried using shops when I last needed winter mountaineering boots. It was no good. I could drive half and hour in one direction to try one pair of boots, so one hour round trip. If I wanted to try others for comparison, that was another round trip in a different direction etc. And each place would have one pair of boots in my size! Online, I can order multiple pairs, have them all in the house at the same time so try one after the other for direct comparison, and send back the ones I don't want. 

Shops have been a dying model for a while, this crisis will just speed that up.

Report
 PaulJepson 22 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

It's default to look at it from our perspective as climbers but what % of Go Outdoors' business is from the likes of us?

The real shame is that a majority of their business will be from people buying Crag Hoppers fleeces, walking boots, hiking gear, and vango kit for their kids DofE awards, and that their business will now likely go to even worse big business like Sports Direct. 

Whilst a small minority of the business in specialist sectors will revert to the independents, most of Go Outdoors' market share will just go to other similar or worse chains.  

Report
 robhorton 22 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

I don't buy much from Go Outdoors but do find them useful for things like car camping kit and have always found their staff reasonably knowledgeable on their core stuff. I wouldn't go to them for crampon advice but neither would I expect Needle Sports to be able to give good advice on family tents nor blow-up mattresses.

I feel sorry for the staff but can't say I feel any great affinity to the actual business.

Report
In reply to Martin W:

Decathlon have been in the UK longer than GO has been around surely? Or at least GO was one shop in Sheffield when Decathlon already had stores in the UK. 

Report
 neilh 22 Jun 2020
In reply to S.Kew:

JD Sports is not owned by Mike Ashley which is Sport Direct.

It is a totally seperate compay, equally shrewd in the sportsgoods world.

Disappointed. GO has some cracking deals if you keep your eyes open.

Probably reopen with less shops and better deals with commercial landlords.Being a commercial retail landlod is not good at the moment.

Report
 DizzyVizion 22 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Definitely gutted as it's one less source for gear.

The Coatbridge store is nearest for me but it's rare that they have in stock what I've found online marked as an in-store only item (not available for delivery).

Staff there have always been helpful. I feel sorry for them.

Report
 Phil79 22 Jun 2020
In reply to Martin W:

> I think it'll be a shame if this means that their Calibre brand of MTBs will disappear.  They seemed to have decent, well-thought-out products at price points that challenged the major brands and other retailers.

I think Calibre is a stand alone brand, but sold exclusively through GO outdoors?

Considering the popularity of their MTBs (Bossnut and Triple B) I'd be surprised if they don't continue, suspect other retailer or big bike shops would be happy to stock them....

Or even go direct sales on their website now they are an established brand... Works for Canyon, Rose etc.  

Post edited at 12:16
Report
In reply to TobyA:

> Decathlon have been in the UK longer than GO has been around surely? Or at least GO was one shop in Sheffield when Decathlon already had stores in the UK. 

This is what I thought but I rarely trust my own memory enough to post with any conviction 

Report
 S.Kew 22 Jun 2020
In reply to neilh:
 

Haven’t mentioned JD Sports.
I said i think Mike Ashley may buy stock from Go Outdoors and sell it in his Sports Direct stores, as he has a history of doing this. Maybe even take over some Go outdoors stores and rebrand them under Sports direct. But like you say i think Go Outdoors will close some and keep others open, but all the additional stock no longer needed will be flogged to someone. 
Go Outdoors has certainly gone downhill though since JD Sports took over them. 
 


 

Report
In reply to Phil79:

Calibre is an in house brand and a few of their staff jumped ship recently. 

I can't see them continuing in the same vein as they did previously. 

Report
 Martin W 22 Jun 2020
In reply to TobyA:

> Decathlon have been in the UK longer than GO has been around surely? Or at least GO was one shop in Sheffield when Decathlon already had stores in the UK. 

Go Outdoors was founded in 1998.  Decathlon opened its first UK store, in London, in 1999.  According to the BBC News piece linked in the OP Go Outdoors currently has 67 stores.  Decathlon has 45.

I'd say they've been going roughly neck and neck, with GO having a small head start, Decathlon maybe being a bit more choosy about where it opened stores - and obviously having the advantage of support from its large corporate parent on the continent.

I'm 99% certain that the GO store in Edinburgh (well, Leith - or Granton if you're being really precise) opened before the Decathlon at Hermiston Gait, though I'm willing to be proven wrong.  I believe the Edinburgh GO store opened in 2011 or 2012 and from what I can find online the Edinburgh Decathlon was certainly open no later than 2014.  It did always strike me as odd that Decathlon took so long to open in Edinburgh, especially since so many of the smaller outdoor retailers here failed or downsized away from Edinburgh (e.g. Nevisport) back in the late noughties/early 2010s.   Maybe Decathlon were being a bit canny and waiting to see how GO fared?

Report
 Phil79 22 Jun 2020
In reply to thepodge:

That's a shame, hope they don't entirely disappear. Their bikes are great value.

Report
In reply to Martin W:

When Decathlon opened in Merry Hill (West Mids) it was really exciting as they were so cheap, that was probably around 2000 or 2001 or so I think? I lived in Thameside (East of Manchester) in 2000 and I think the Stockport Decathlon was open then as well. I don't know when GO started expanding across the country, but I guess a good bit later than that? I lived abroad for most of the last 20 years so shopping at Decathlon for cheap cycling gear for me and kids clothes for the kids was a big part of summer holidays staying with my parents! They definitely only got a big GO near them about 10 years ago. Now in Sheffield we have both (for the time being at least!) quite close to each other, so if you can't get what you need in one, you can pop over the ring road and see if the other has a reasonably priced alternative!

Report
In reply to S.Kew:

> I said i think Mike Ashley may buy stock from Go Outdoors and sell it in his Sports Direct stores, as he has a history of doing this. Maybe even take over some Go outdoors stores and rebrand them under Sports direct.  <

I think Sports Direct took over Field and Trek some time ago. Some F&T shops stayed open for a bit but closed once stocks had run down. Sports Direct at least used to have occasional climbing shoes, QDs, nuts in its shops (possibly some ex F&T) but I haven't noticed any climbing gear in them for some time. I imagine the climbing sections of Go Outdoors would suffer a similar fate.

Report
 GrahamD 22 Jun 2020
In reply to TobyA:

> Decathlon have been in the UK longer than GO has been around surely? Or at least GO was one shop in Sheffield when Decathlon already had stores in the UK. 

I think it depends where you were.  Harlow had GO long before Decathlon 

Report
 Martin Hore 22 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Sorry if someone else has already made this point. I thought administration was something a company entered into if it could not pay it's creditors (liabilities to staff and customers included). I don't understand how Go Outdoors as a part of the JD Sports Group is permitted to enter administration while JD remains solvent. Surely the responsibility for GO's liabilities rests with JD. Seems to me that JD is trying to avoid these. 

Martin

Report
 jimtitt 22 Jun 2020
In reply to Martin Hore:

It's a plc so a seperate company and can be liquidated with no ties to the parent company. It's normal.

Report
 LastBoyScout 22 Jun 2020
In reply to S.Kew:

> Mike Ashley has a history of buying struggling firms for cheap. A very shrewd business man. Ruthless though. He may just buy stock from Go outdoors and put it into his Sports direct shops. He has done this with other shops that were entering administration. 

Unfortunately, when he got involved with House of Fraser, it meant that those shops pretty much turned into Sports Direct jumble sales over night. In amongst what was previously the well laid out upper end of the clothing market, you'd start bumping into rails of cheap sports clothes.

Report
 S.Kew 22 Jun 2020
In reply to LastBoyScout:

Yeah. At times it seems as though Mike Ashley is taking over the high street. 
I do think you could see increased climbing stock at Decathlon if Go Outdoors completely go under. Decathlon definitely have more climbing gear online than they used to. Don’t know about Decathlon stores, as haven’t been in one for a while. 

Report
In reply to TobyA:

You confused me there Toby. Where the hell is Thameside? However, I then realised that you meant Tameside. I certainly remember the Stockport decathlon being open a long time before the Ancoats Go Outdoors, of course our perspective will be based on what is happening locally, which might not be reflected nationally.

Report
In reply to The New NickB:

Sorry, predictive text on my phone might have corrected it for me! Lived in Mossley (not Moseley as my phone immediately corrected it to!).

Report
 freefall01 23 Jun 2020
In reply to Lemony:

Business-wise, the most profitable area of these shops is the boot room.

Whe I worked for Tiso in the 80's they only stocked climing gear for show, thee was no money in it and it was too easy to nick.

I once had to stop a business man and empty his briefcase which he'd stuffed a few friends !!!

Report
In reply to leon 1:

JD sports bought GO back. 

Can someone smart explain to me what just have happened and how is this legal? Did they just really write off debt, retained staff and will carry on as usual? 

https://news.sky.com/story/jd-sports-buys-back-go-outdoors-after-pushing-it-into-administration-12013411

Report
 GeorgeFNewport 23 Jun 2020
In reply to Lemony:

The seem to have dug out the long shelf life climbing shoes when I went in last week, I saw a pair of Scarpa's which haven't been current range for some years. 

Report
 Simon Caldwell 24 Jun 2020
In reply to PPP:

Just a standard tax fiddle

Report
 GrahamD 24 Jun 2020
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

Or a way of laying people off without going through the process. 

Report
 Slarti B 24 Jun 2020
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

> Just a standard tax fiddle

I think this sort of "pre-pack" administration is not so much a tax fiddle as a way of avoiding all creditiors and existing obligations, especially landlords.  It means they can drop less profitable stores and renegotiate leases.   Presumably if staff are kept on they would get some protecytion through TUPE? 

It leaves a bad taste in the mouth, although it can also be seen as a way of getting out of expensive long term leases from inflexible landlords. 

Report
In reply to Slarti B:

It's basically an equivalent of Chapter 11, near enough.

Report
 ring ouzel 24 Jun 2020
In reply to freefall01:

Really? I worked in the Stirling shop in 1982 then opened up the Buchanan St. shop in Glasgow in 1984ish where I managed all the climbing gear and technical side. Our store manager (guy named Jon) was told by Graham Tiso himself that we had to employ people with climbing experience to work in that section as it was important to him. 

I agree it made little money. All our climbing gear was on a farmers  rake thingy that Graham always used. Positioned behind the till because it was easy to nick. Did you do that too?

But there were always climbers employed in the shops and we were encouraged to be active. We needed to know all the gear and how to use it. It mattered to Graham that we did. It wasn't stocked just for show.

Report
 Doug 24 Jun 2020
In reply to ring ouzel:

I remember Jon/John telling me that the most profitable line (combination of profit per item & N° sold) was wellington boots

But that was 40 odd years ago & the company is no longer managed by Graham & is much larger. Does today's management have the same attitudes ?

Report
In reply to leon 1:

Just heard a report that they've already pre-packed.  Was probably the plan all along.

Report
 Martin Hore 24 Jun 2020
In reply to jimtitt:

> It's a plc so a seperate company and can be liquidated with no ties to the parent company. It's normal.

Thanks Jim. I thought that was probably the case. I guess my argument is that it shouldn't be. If one company takes over another, it should take on current and future liabilities as well as the assets. Perhaps the law needs reviewing?

Martin

Report
 tehmarks 24 Jun 2020
In reply to Martin Hore:

The problem is that if the law were different, it would curb innovation. Companies would be unwilling to try new ventures if the very existence of its succesful core business was at stake if the new venture failed. There's a delicate balance to be achieved; I agree that in this case that it doesn't sit well.

Report
 ring ouzel 24 Jun 2020
In reply to Doug:

Hi Doug! Yes I remember that! 

After Graham died it went downhill. One of his sons took over and then it was bought out by someone else who also own lots of other shops. When I go in now its a very different shop to what it was then. 

Remember in Stirling we had all the climbing mags on the counter? We were encouraged to read all of them to keep up to date. I think the Stirling shop is now part of a supermarket. Times change.

Report
In reply to Martin Hore:

> Thanks Jim. I thought that was probably the case. I guess my argument is that it shouldn't be. If one company takes over another, it should take on current and future liabilities as well as the assets. Perhaps the law needs reviewing?

> Martin

The Board of a company is legally obliged to call in Administrators if the assets cannot cover current and future liabilities. They could be criminally liable if they continue trading. If there are insufficient assets to pay for Administrators, a court will appoint one. The Board and thus shareholders then have no control and the best offers will be taken for whatever there is. In the current retail world. Its rent (and cash flow)that is the issue. If You legislate that new owners (if there are any) to take all liabilities then no one would buy them because self evidently they would fail. 

Report
 Martin Bennett 24 Jun 2020
In reply to leon 1:

Fear not. I'm led to believe it won't, after all, happen and that JD Sports will buy it back from the administrators, minus a shop or two.

Post edited at 22:58
Report
 Baz P 25 Jun 2020
In reply to aostaman:

Unless you made the current liabilities, via purchases, worth more than the assets, went into liquidation on Friday and let the wife buy it back on Monday.

Does this still happen?

Report
 jimtitt 25 Jun 2020
In reply to Baz P:

I've never seen a commercial invoice that doesn't say that all goods remain the property of the seller until they are paid in full. Unpaid-for stock isn't an asset and the receiver will arrange it's return (eventually).

Organised or planned insolvency IS a useful commercial tool because it allows a company to restructure and continue trading or even prosper at a level previously unthought of, that's why all countries allow it in one form or another. It's not all dodgy one-man band builders out there, Chrysler's Chapter 11 insolvency is one of the better known examples.

Post edited at 16:51
Report
 Baz P 25 Jun 2020
In reply to jimtitt:

But the goods could be buildings, fixtures, car parks or repairs.

Lots of small company invoices, mine included, do not stipulate property ownership.

Report
 Ian W 25 Jun 2020
In reply to Baz P:

> But the goods could be buildings, fixtures, car parks or repairs.

> Lots of small company invoices, mine included, do not stipulate property ownership.


Then they are stupid. When it s clear the company is potentially insolvent, the legal onus on the directors is to the creditors, no longer the shareholders. as directors it is assumed you know when this point arrives; ignorance is not an acceptable defence, and whilst the penalties are rarely more than financial, jail time is an option. If any action is seen to be done deliberately to disadvantage creditors, it is an offence.

Report
 jimtitt 26 Jun 2020
In reply to Baz P:

> But the goods could be buildings, fixtures, car parks or repairs.

> Lots of small company invoices, mine included, do not stipulate property ownership.


None of those are goods.

Report
 Gillieshill 26 Jun 2020
In reply to kevin stephens:

What local climbing shops?  None left here in Stirling.  Just a Cotswold.

Report
In reply to leon 1:

If they own the Sheffield building I can imagine it'll be sold for redevelopment into flats and they move out to somewhere with more space and better parking. 

GO is one of my least favourite places to shop, their website is poor and fighting your way through the clothing section of the Sheffield shop is never pleasant. 

Plus their pricing structure and loyalty card doesn't instill any confidence... Pay five pounds to save 7 pounds on a 20 pound item? Well you've just made up the full price them haven't you? 

Report
 SteveX 26 Jun 2020
In reply to Baz P:

You should also state payment terms, if you do not say 7 days, do not be surprised if someone takes 3 months.

Report
 tehmarks 26 Jun 2020
In reply to SteveX:

Not entirely true. Payment terms are assumed to be 30 days unless otherwise agreed between both parties. Obviously it's good pratice to agree and state payment terms specifically, but the default is 30 days if this hasn't been done.

Report

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.