/ Fake, dangerous climbing gear

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Marmolata - on 28 Jan 2019

Haven't seen it published here, I apologize If it has been already posted.

The EU has published some info on "climbing" gear that was for sale online. It doesn't comply with the CE guidelines even though it has the CE logo imprinted.

Further information here:

https://ec.europa.eu/consumers/consumers_safety/safety_products/rapex/alerts/?event=main.weeklyOverview&web_report_id=3232&Year=2019&Category=16&lng=en

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subtle on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to Marmolata:

meh, I bought some "Russian" ice screws back in early 90's when the guys used to flog them round the campsites in Cham etc., its always going to happen

if Brexit happens then who will certify the climbing stuff for safety, will there need to be a UK CE equivalent? 

Post edited at 14:58
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beardy mike - on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to subtle: I'd disagree that this is a "meh" issue. CE is being exploited by certain unreputable manufactures in China who have come up with a brilliant idea - China Export. They use a logo which is mostly undistinguishable from a real CE mark. The issue is clear, that these items go through no certification and are largely not fit for purpose. But you crack on, I'm sure if you bought some russian titanium screws back in the 90's it'll be reet. Apart from the russian screws were cack... as for your other question, well you don't have to be in the EU to regard CE as a sign of proper certification. But there is also UIAA certification which is extremely close to CE and which is what Americans and other states regard as a sign of excellence.

 

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danm on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to subtle:

EN standards for mountaineering equipment didn't exist in the early 90's, so selling those ice screws wasn't illegal back then. It would be now.

Brexit will have no immediate bearing on standards, and there are no plans for the UK to leave CEN. I can't see any UK based manufacturer having any interest at all in paying for separate UK certification when they'd need to certify to CE standards anyway in order to sell into the huge market right on their doorstep. BD certify to CE standards despite being a US based company, by way of example.

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Jamie Wakeham - on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to beardy mike:

There's no such thing as a 'China Export' mark - that's an oft-repeated myth.  It's simply a counterfeited CE mark.

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beardy mike - on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to Jamie Wakeham:

Same effect though isn't it...

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deepsoup - on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to beardy mike:

> China Export

There is no such thing as a "China Export" mark - that's something that started as a joke and became an urban myth.  Of course there are Chinese products out there with a CE mark on that shouldn't have one, but that mark is fully intended to be a bogus/counterfeit "Conformité Européenne". 

If the mark itself doesn't quite conform exactly to the standard for a CE mark that's just a quality control issue, which is hardly surprising really!

 

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Ridge - on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to deepsoup and Jamie Wakeham:

Thanks for that, saves me having to do my 'China Export' internet myth rant

 

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Ridge - on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to beardy mike:

> Same effect though isn't it...

Nope. It peddles the myth that you can tell a bogus CE mark by looking at the spacing on the letters, which is total bollocks.

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beardy mike - on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to Ridge:

Fair comment. If I could edit my response I would.

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Ridge - on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to beardy mike:

No worries, I spend a fair proportion of my working life pointing out you can't perform CPR on yourself by coughing, and perhaps emailing 8,000 of your colleagues with this nugget wasn't perhaps a good idea

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danm on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to Ridge:

It's a bit of effort, but what I've done in the past is to look up the notified body using their number after the CE mark. An email to them to confirm that they have indeed certified the product or not will do the trick. 

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GarethSL on 28 Jan 2019
In reply to Marmolata:

NTR Ropes and Belts "Never take a risk"

How apt. Anyone remember them Ukranian cams and plastic nuts? 'Perhaps Jiangsu NTR is the new Gear 4 Rocks.

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petegunn on 10 Feb 2019
In reply to Marmolata:

Thanks for posting.

One of my students has the black harness shown. I have given it to a friend who has contacts at lyon equipment so that they can have a look at it and test it.

I will post up on here when I hear back.

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Hyphin - on 10 Feb 2019
In reply to Jamie Wakeham:

And sometimes it's even legit  had exchanged off emails with one Chinese company few years ago. They were in dispute with certifying authorities about having to pay for separate certificates for items manufactured together but then sold under different brand names in different countries. They forwarded me copies of correspondence, including eventual agreement that they could use CE. They had until then appeared on the naughty list. 

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