/ Arete Sans Nom - Aiguille Verte

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HosteDenis 07 Aug 2019

Does anyone know a good online topo, or which book to buy or look at, to know the details about the Arete Sans Nom that takes you to the Aiguille Verte?

Thanks.

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pneame 07 Aug 2019
In reply to HosteDenis:

Probably can't do better than CampToCamp in June this year - https://www.camptocamp.org/routes/55197/fr/aiguille-verte-arete-sans-nom

Looks fabulous. And a challenge. Challenging getting down again!

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teh_mark 07 Aug 2019
In reply to pneame:

> Looks fabulous.

Fabulously chossy from what I've heard!

I found an account from some New Zealanders who traversed from the Drus to the Verte while looking for info on the Drus traverse a few months ago. Might be a useful read in addition to the CampToCamp page.

https://alpineteam.co.nz/2018/traverse-les-drus-aiguille-verte

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jcw 08 Aug 2019
In reply to teh_mark:

I don't think those who've actually done it, and  I know a few, would describe it as chossy

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summo 08 Aug 2019
In reply to jcw:

> I don't think those who've actually done it, and  I know a few, would describe it as chossy

The verte is a classy mountain. I'd avoid ascending by whymper, only because the other main lines are much better. 

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jcw 08 Aug 2019
In reply to summo:

Quite,  including the Sans Nom, the classiest of the ridges as I have always believed. We're not talking about the face which I always regret not having done with one of the Burgess twins. 

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jon 08 Aug 2019
In reply to jcw:

> Quite,  including the Sans Nom, the classiest of the ridges as I have always believed.

I think the following sentence explains it:

> Here our plans to continue to Les Droites, another day's climbing, were foiled; the descent slopes were completely bare in the late season.

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jcw 08 Aug 2019
In reply to jon:

Well, of course the conditions are important. What I was sniping at is wannabe gurus of Chamonix climbing making ex cathedra pronouncements because they have got themselves into the top of the pops as posters n the weekly competition  (see the post on like and dislike buttons). What I appreciate is measured judgement based on real knowledge rather than remarks like  "fabulously chossy from what I've heard" in reply to an experienced mountaineer like Peter.

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pneame 08 Aug 2019
In reply to jcw:

Thanks John! I'm touched - although the TR link posted by teh_mark is quite cool, in September (if the article date is the trip date)which might not be the best time of year. Pretty impressive enchainement, I thought. 

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teh_mark 08 Aug 2019
In reply to jcw:

On review it appears I actually misread the original post. I neither have knowledge of or have heard anything about the quality of rock on the Arete Sans Nom. At all. For some reason I read it as continuing a traverse of the Drus over the Sans Nom. I'd been to the pub. By most accounts I've heard, the rock quality indeed isn't particularly fantastic if you continue over the Grand Dru in the direction of the Sans Nom.

For the record, the emphasis in my original reply was on from what I've heard - i.e. from speaking to people who have done the routes in question, and from spending a fair amount of time poring over accounts and topos and routes descriptions while thinking about looking at doing the Drus traverse. I don't think I'd ever claim to be a 'Chamonix guru', or even an 'aspirant guru'. Nor a grit guru, or an ice axe guru, or a Bernie Sanders guru, or a guru on any of the topics I've commented on lately.

I couldn't really give a f*ck about where I appear in a list of top posters. Other than the deranged, who would honestly think that being a prolific poster on an Internet forum makes them a foremost expert on the subject matter? I'd like to think that - on the subject of climbing at least - I only post where I think I can be helpful or contribute something to the discussion, but I'd never consider myself an expert. Not even remotely - I'm a committed punter at very best. In this instance, I thought the link might be of interest and thought it might be worth highlighting that I'd heard from a few source that a section of the ridge isn't particularly great. Talking about a completely different route. Only trying to be helpful, if admittedly a touch flippant.

(Do you honestly think that I think I'm entitled to make 'ex cathedra pronouncements' on anything because I've had a lot of spare time on my hands and have posted a lot recently? Bizarre.)

Try the other side of the bed tomorrow morning.

Post edited at 23:15
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jcw 08 Aug 2019
In reply to teh_mark:

probably will, it has been a stressing day though I haven't been to the pub. 

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summo 09 Aug 2019
In reply to teh_mark:

I think the clue really is when they say it was bare and loose etc. Not surprising in September last year, with it being very hot for a long time. 

They said whymper was bare, again this can often be the case by August in most years. Stone generally whistle down there late afternoon every summer. 

Ps. It's a great hill, very early start up moine, down whymper. You'll never forget it for the right reasons and would be back for more another year. 

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jon 09 Aug 2019
In reply to summo:

> ... whymper was bare, again this can often be the case by August in most years. Stone generally whistle down there late afternoon every summer.

Not really, they start at 9am when the sun hits the Moine ridge!  

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Robert Durran 09 Aug 2019
In reply to jon:

> Not really, they start at 9am when the sun hits the Moine ridge!  

I think descending the Whymper first thing in the morning in summer is probably one of the more dangerous things I have ever done. I was too tired to even think straight and it was a long time ago, but I don't imagine things are any better these days!

And the Moine Ridge up and down (another occasion) is one of my chossier experiences.

Post edited at 09:54
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summo 09 Aug 2019
In reply to jon:

> Not really, they start at 9am when the sun hits the Moine ridge!  

No wonder it was lively the last time I descended whymper at 4pm! Yes. It starts when the sun warms the face, but it's worse later. 

Post edited at 16:47
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jcw 09 Aug 2019
In reply to jon:

They start a darned sight earlier than that if you've missed the way and get on the face after doing  the Couturier. Martin and I finally decided it was safer to unrope and each for himself as the grand pianos trundled down. I fell but by some miracle saved myself and finally we managed to abseil over the rimaye. One of the most genuinely frightening experiences of my Alpine life. 

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