/ Tips for safe commuting in the winter?

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Bobling 28 Aug 2019

Ride home tonight had a distinct Autumnal feel with cloud cover and rain making it dark and wet, though not yet cold.  Everything just felt a little harder...my glasses were covered in moisture, visibility generally was worse, pedestrians and drivers seemed to be paying a little less attention, brakes were wet and so a little less effective, cars seemed to be louder and closer...and so on...a lot of little factors stacking up to make it feel just a bit more dangerous.  

So would anyone care to share their top tips for staying alive while cycle commuting in the winter?  Particularly anyone who has a solution to the wet glasses problem...as per threads passim I need to wear glasses to prevent eye infections from having my eyes sandblasted with crud.  Anyone have a recommended lights set up?

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More-On 28 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

For the glasses the following will probably sound terribly obvious but a survey of fellow commuters at work each year suggests it's not - wear a helmet (or hat) with a peak and gloves, track mitts etc with a good wiping area, and then be utterly scrupulous with one hand for glasses and the other for everything else (nose, drips from helmet etc etc).

As I say not earth shattering, but it works...

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the sheep 28 Aug 2019
In reply to More-On:

Your best option is having lots of rear lights so drivers can see you from behind as that’s your biggest risk in low light 

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LastBoyScout 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Treat glasses regularly with Rain-X or similar

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elsewhere 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Wet glasses - just wipe them a bit.

Usb chargeable flashing lights, 2 front, 2 back. Hence doesn't really matter if a battery goes flat as you still have a light.

You can put some lights on helmet or rucksack so more visible above cars. Make sure they really are visible and not pointing at sky.

Put the lights on in low bright sunshine.

spoke reflectors or reflective tyres, smother bike in reflective tape.

You might be safer dressed in black and without lights as you will be more cautious! All the hi Viz and lights makes no difference when people are not paying attention.

Give up if you are recovering from a cold. Unless you bounce well  maybe give up for a few days per year to avoid frost.

Post edited at 00:18
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Dave B 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

I'm very happy with the cateye volt 800 front and use exposure trace r rear.  I've got a see sense icon 2 on order too. I'll compare and contrast. Hope the new light will be here soon... 

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felt 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

I don't commute but do ride most days in winter on the road bike.

Watch wet leaves and wet painted parts of the road/metal road coverings when cornering and changing direction.

Neoprene booties keep your feet dry and warm. A thin skull cap under the helmet is nice at sub 4C.

When the sun is behind you and low in the sky you don't exist for even the most conscientious of drivers, doubly so if the road is also wet. I've never worked out a satisfactory solution, apart from not being on the bike. A flashing front blinky or two might help.

Black without fluorescent detailing is for crows and Benedictine monks.

Don't obsess about Strava if possible. 

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Presley Whippet 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

As above, 2 sets of good lights on your bike provides redundancy. 

Don't forget to light yourself as well. Lights on your helmet, jacket, rucksack will ensure that you are visible should the worst happen and you part company with your bike. 

Proviz jackets are excellent, sweaty but a small price to pay. 

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nniff 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

As above:

Rain-X on glasses.  Peaked cap - remarkably good at keeping the rain off the lenses (inside and out).  I always get too hot in a cap, so I have a Bontrager helmet that has a peak that fits to the cradle with velcro.

Exposure Tracer-R on the back and another on my helmet (held on with a saddle rail mount and aero post bungee).  And a Cycliq camera/light.

Two Exposure Sirius lights on the front - both flashing in built up areas or both on full beam out of town.

Reflective wrist bands with red LEDs on each wrist for turn signals and for the peripheral vision of those drivers who forget that have not yet actually overtaken you

Black reflective tape on the front forks. 

I look like a Christmas tree having a fit

Camera on the front too.

I also carry an elastic headband thingy that converts one of the Sirius lights into a headtorch for when I get a puncture in the pouring rain at night.

All lights on, day and night.  Same summer and winter

40 miles/day into central London, whatever the weather, although if it's really awful I'll drive the first/last six miles

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LastBoyScout 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

What everyone else said - 2x lights front and back, reflective straws on spokes and reflective clothing:

https://www.halfords.com/cycling/cycling-clothing/hi-vis/halfords-spoke-reflectives

Keep an eye out in Aldi - the same things come up there in the bike special events for about £4.

I tend to run MTB SPDs now on my commute bike, as easier to get in and out of and the shoes are easier to walk in. Wear booties over the top and wool socks to keep feet warm.

I've also moved to hi-viz/reflective gloves - Altura NightVision 4 windproof or SealSkinz all weather XP ones if it's wet.

Also have a hi-viz/reflective rucksack cover - £5, also Aldi.

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elsewhere 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

One of my best buys were Shimano winter MTB boots. Still a bit of dampness in heavy rain but much dryer and nicer than messing about with soggy overshoes.

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TobyA 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Mudguards. They add weight, can rattle and generally be a bit annoying. But getting covered in gritty water and mud is considerably worse.

And the weather isn't that awful yet.

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the sheep 29 Aug 2019
In reply to nniff:

> I also carry an elastic headband thingy that converts one of the Sirius lights into a headtorch for when I get a puncture in the pouring rain at night.

Scwalbe Marathon plus are awesome tyres to avoid punctures. I have just ordered anew one for my rer while. Its the third successive one i have worn out before getting a puncture!

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Jon Greengrass 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

>  brakes were wet and so a little less effective,

Disc brakes?

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Bobling 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Once again UKC does the business, thank you everyone for your thoughts!  Some great gems here.

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Wanderer100 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

I wear glasses all the time. Misty or wet lenses are rarely a problem as I wear a peaked cycling cap under my helmet and that manages to keep the moisture down to a minimum. 

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nniff 29 Aug 2019
In reply to the sheep:

> Scwalbe Marathon plus are awesome tyres to avoid punctures. I have just ordered anew one for my rer while. Its the third successive one i have worn out before getting a puncture!

I hear people say good things about them.  I, however, hold a deep-seated prejudice against Scwhalbe after my sustained and disastrous efforts to go tubeless.  If they weren't spraying sealant everywhere they were trying to put me into a ditch.  You had one job.......

Michelin Pro4 for me

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Graeme G 29 Aug 2019
In reply to LastBoyScout:

Never heard of this. Just checked it out, is it any use for walking/climbing? I have to wear glasses and if it’s wet my view is either blurry as I’ve taken my glasses off or blurry cause my glasses are covered in rain. Drives me nuts!

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Yanis Nayu 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Drivers are always EVEN worse around cyclists in rainy weather, for reasons I don’t understand. 

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nniff 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Graeme G:

> Never heard of this. Just checked it out, is it any use for walking/climbing? I have to wear glasses and if it’s wet my view is either blurry as I’ve taken my glasses off or blurry cause my glasses are covered in rain. Drives me nuts!

Assuming you're talking about Rain-X - to an extent.  It makes the water bead and so it runs off more readily, especially if there's wind as there is on a bike (and indeed car windscreens for which is intended).  You can tap your glasses against something and the water pings off.  Perfect it is not.

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Graeme G 29 Aug 2019
In reply to nniff:

I was, thanks. Might give it a try.

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subtle 29 Aug 2019
In reply to the sheep:

> Scwalbe Marathon plus are awesome tyres to avoid punctures. 

They are indeed! And they even can come with a reflective band round them to help headlights see them.

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RX-78 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

I wore a high viz gillet, as it helps when you are stopped at the lights and a truck is behind you. I got to see the effect once when the police were doing a 'try to see what it's like type thing for truck drivers and cyclists.

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subtle 29 Aug 2019
In reply to RX-78:

> I wore a high viz gillet, as it helps when you are stopped at the lights and a truck is behind you. 

Not that handy when carrying a rucksack on the commute though.

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elsewhere 29 Aug 2019
In reply to RX-78:

> I wore a high viz gillet,

Good alternative for light rain or moderately cold.

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subtle 29 Aug 2019
In reply to subtle:

Nice, looks like a great option!

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Wilderbeest 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Came off my bike in November 2 years back...completely lost the front wheel turning...

3 months limping and driving to work followed so I promptly ditched the so called “4 season” tyres and fitted some with a bit of tread. OK so they’re not cool and they are supposedly heavier and slower  but I really do feel safer.

Mind you I’ve stopped taking corners too quickly when it’s a bit slippy under foot and that probably helps

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Mike-W-99 29 Aug 2019
In reply to subtle:

> They are indeed! And they even can come with a reflective band round them to help headlights see them.

Best tyres I’ve ever used. One puncture in over a decade using them and that’d floored an elephant.

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elsewhere 29 Aug 2019
In reply to Wilderbeest:

> Came off my bike in November 2 years back...completely lost the front wheel turning...

Leaves compacted into slimy mulch and a dirty puddle dried into slippery muck have been my downfalls.

As has an impatient kid opening car door rather than wait in traffic jam. You can get doored from both left or right.

Post edited at 23:41
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TobyA 30 Aug 2019
In reply to the sheep:

How far did you ride to wear out a Marathon Plus? I'm on a second pair. I only got rid of the first pair because the sidewalls were cracking a bit. I think I had had them for maybe 6 years and had probably done the best part of 10,000 kms on them.

I've just taken the second pair off my bike because I caved in to fashion pressure and bought some Panracer Gravel Kings to have tubeless on my bike. Everyone moans about Marathon's being hard to fit, but FFS! I was fighting with the Gravel Kings for what felt like hours! Total 'mare. I've got one set up tubeless successfully now but the other one still has a tube in it, hoping that after its been seated and inflated that way, I might actually be able to get it to seat tubeless.

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climbingpixie 30 Aug 2019
In reply to subtle:

I was about to recommend something similar. I've got one of the Hump rucksack covers and it's great. It fits my rucksack or on my pannier, depending on what I'm using on the bike, an I get visibility and protection from rain/road muck.

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greg_may_ 30 Aug 2019
In reply to Bobling:

As per other, Marathon Plus tyres. They work.

Mudguards and winter boots. You’ll not regret it.

Thankfully I’m lucky enough to do all bar the last 500m of my commute on  canal. Cyclocross tyres 80% of the year  which get switched for studded Marathons when it gets icy.

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martianb 13 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Having been almost knocked off my bike twice riding to work in the spring evenings with a low sun. I've fitted a helmet light, adjusted it to point where I look and set it to strobe.

It's saved me a few times as drivers come whizzing up to junctions or roundabouts, blatantly not seeing me until I look directly at them and they get 'strobed' by my helmet light and they immediately notice me jumping on the brakes. I've surprised myself as to how noticeable it's worked.

I also have a light on the bars set to constant, there's a rear red light on the helmet light, 2 rear lights on the bike set to strobe and 2 of the hi vis yellow bands with flashing red lights on it on my rucsac. 

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AndyC 13 Sep 2019
In reply to martianb:

Conversely, the other morning I had my first encounter of the season with an idiot cyclist with a small supernova strapped to his forehead. Be seen, be safe, most importantly cycle defensively, but don't blind oncoming cyclists and other road users. It's effing selfish.

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monkey man 14 Sep 2019
In reply to AndyC:

Enjoying these replies. Mudguards (properly fitted ones rather than plastic clip ons which always rub) and a very bright front light as none of the roads I commute on are lit are my tips.

I like the idea of the proviz bag - does anyone have any recommendations for a properly waterproof one that is durable? Had some alpkit and expeed ones which died quick. Would be even better if it were reflective too!

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Dave B 14 Sep 2019
In reply to monkey man:

I've been using an ortleib courier bag with additional solas reflecting tape. 

Definitely waterproof 

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spenser 14 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

With the brakes I would suggest tapping on them when approaching a bend, this gets rid of the water on the rim of the wheel (presuming that you are using rim brakes).

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angry pirate 14 Sep 2019
Dax H 15 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

There is a guy I see cycling around with a plastic stick that sticks out from the side of his bike in to the road with a light on the end. It's maybe about 500mm long. I certainly find it makes him more visible and I managed to chat with him once and he said that most people leave extra room when overtaking him than they do if he doesn't fit it. 

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Bobling 16 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Cycle defensively. Always presume that the vehicle on the side road or at the roundabout has not seen you. Risk is a % game. Wear bright clothing, cycle on cycle paths when you can, minimise roads with lots of traffic, be assertive when you have to be, bright lights, mudguards, marathon plus tyres, don't cycle when its icy (I came off 4 x in one winter before I learnt that one). Buff for your head and ears, buff for your neck, warm gloves, overshoes, change of socks at work....see it as some light training for Scottish winter climbing.

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galpinos 16 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

This is going to be my first winter as a cycle commuter. I've got two front lights (one stobe, one constant), two rear (both flashing) and a Proviz gillet that I can wear over whatever I've got on.

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Garethza 16 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Don't be that douchebag with their front light on strobe when you are riding on an unlit bike lane!  

Post edited at 17:11
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AndyC 16 Sep 2019
In reply to Garethza:

Unless it's snowing! Cycling through heavy snowfall in the dark with the front light on strobe is magical!

But that also reminds me it will soon be time to break out the studded tyres

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overdrawnboy 16 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Buy a Bus Pass

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elsewhere 16 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Moisturiser! Something to protect your face from sleet morning and evening on a bad day.

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nniff 17 Sep 2019
In reply to elsewhere:

> Moisturiser! Something to protect your face from sleet morning and evening on a bad day.

Definitely, and Burt's Bees pomegranate chap stick for lips and nose, and two tissues, one up the hem of each side of your jersey.

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Timmd 17 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

I find this air horn to be very effective at getting people to notice me, Hi Vis and flashing lights are great, but they can depend on people being on the ball enough to look all around them. An airhorn like this means that people who aren't looking can be alerted that you're actually physically there (rather than just spiritually, ha).

https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/bells-horns/samui-air-zound-3-rechargeable-horn/

Seeing drivers heads spin around in alarm after I've pressed it is something of a guilty pleasure.  

I leave it switched to 'full' and just gently tap it for pedestrians. At 115db it really does cut through the noise of traffic.

Post edited at 12:00
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Guy Hurst 17 Sep 2019
In reply to Bobling:

Somebody has already mentioned spoke reflectors, but I would stress the benefit of these. They make a massive difference to your visibility from sideways on. Get the Scotchlite 3M ones, which stay in place and are highly reflective, unlike some others.

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Timmd 17 Sep 2019
In reply to elsewhere:

> Moisturiser! Something to protect your face from sleet morning and evening on a bad day.

That reminds me I need to get my mountain orientated Mtn Eqip waterproof re taped for winter. As I teenager/early 20's person, I used to like cycling back from the Peak with the sense of having had my face scrubbed clean by the hail. 

Read this back, it seems like a masochistic thing to enjoy - maybe I'm going soft?!

Post edited at 15:11
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climb the peak 17 Sep 2019
In reply to nniff:

inspirational

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Dax H 06:34 Wed
In reply to Bobling:

Ay that sort of thing yes. 

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Duncan Bourne 07:17 Wed
In reply to elsewhere:

> Usb chargeable flashing lights, 2 front, 2 back. Hence doesn't really matter if a battery goes flat as you still have a light.

I used to use USB lights but then it would come to winter and I had forgotten to charge them, or after the weekend and I had forgotten to charge them. Now I use battery lights and carry spare batteries.

i agree the more lights the better.

> hi Viz and lights makes no difference when people are not paying attention.

Amen to that.

I keep my road commuting to a minimum. We have cycle trails and canals although low bridges can be a problem in the dark winter mornings.

If snowing I use my mountain bike although I find snow easier to cope with than hard frost.

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cb294 07:57 Wed
In reply to Duncan Bourne:

Depending on where you live, a second wheel set with spiked tires can make sense.

Takes me a couple of rides to get used to each winter, but with ice or hard packed snow on the cycle path it makes all the difference. Brake or lean into curves just as normal, and don`bother about ice patches. Just don`t forget you cannot corner as hard on dry tarmac!

CB

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Duncan Bourne 09:51 Wed
In reply to cb294:

Thanks for the tip

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Timmd 12:53 Wed
In reply to elsewhere:

> You might be safer dressed in black and without lights as you will be more cautious! All the hi Viz and lights makes no difference when people are not paying attention.

That's why this is cool. It's very gratifying to see driver's heads spin around in alarm.

https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/bells-horns/samui-air-zound-3-rechargeable-horn/

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elsewhere 21:13 Wed
In reply to Bobling:

Cycling stuff at Aldi, Sunday  29 September.

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