Pedestrians on cycle paths/lanes?

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 The Potato 16 Nov 2018

I dont mean shared paths / lanes that have the blue bike / person symbol on them I just mean a path with a bike symbol on it.

Are people allowed to walk on them? I encounter this daily and Im not certain enough of the law to comment on it.

 elsewhere 16 Nov 2018
In reply to The Potato:

There would have to be red circle no pedestrians sign. I don't remember ever seeing one on a cycle path.

http://www.bikehub.co.uk/featured-articles/cycling-and-the-law/

When using separated-from-cars cycle paths ie signed footways shared with pedestrians, cyclists ought to keep to the side intended for cyclists. Pedestrians do not have to keep to “their” side of shared-use paths, the markings for pedestrians are advisory only.

Remember, Highway Code rule 62 says:

“Cycle Tracks. These are normally located away from the road, but may occasionally be found alongside footpaths or pavements. […] Take care when passing pedestrians, especially children, older or disabled people, and allow them plenty of room. Always be prepared to slow down and stop if necessary…Cyclists and pedestrians may be segregated or they may share the same space (unsegregated). When using segregated tracks you MUST keep to the side intended for cyclists as the pedestrian side remains a pavement or footpath.”

Cyclist have to stay on cycling bit, pedestrians don't have to stay on pedestrian bit?

Post edited at 20:05
In reply to The Potato:

It's the sort of thing that many people decide to get their knickers in a twist over. If I encounter people walking I slow down and ride round them, or make a friendly noise/bell so they can move. I do have a friend who thinks that riding fast under a blind bridge (Union canal in Edinburgh for those familiar) with a narrow path or passing pedestrians closely at c.25mph is acceptable because he rang a bell first. Berk. 

I don't know what it is about the British psyche that makes sharing space such an antagonistic thing. I hear friends who are cyclists moaning about f*cking pedestrians or bloody dog walkers when they've probably been obstructed by one pedestrian/dog, and likewise I hear people moan about cyclists when they've encountered one path-hogging cyclist. It's like a slower and less lethal version of the roads. Why can't we get our heads around the concept of sharing space and making allowances?

Post edited at 19:59
 The Potato 16 Nov 2018
In reply to The Potato:

Im happy to slow down a bit and use my bell, problem is when there are people who think they own the path and berate me for cycling there

 The Potato 16 Nov 2018
In reply to elsewhere:

> When using separated-from-cars cycle paths ie signed footways shared with pedestrians, cyclists ought to keep to the side intended for cyclists. Pedestrians do not have to keep to “their” side of shared-use paths, the markings for pedestrians are advisory only.

Ummm.....Ive already said on non shared paths so whats your point?

 elsewhere 16 Nov 2018
In reply to The Potato:

Added a para but pedestrians markings advisory probably the main point along with no red circle sign for pedestrians.

You can only point to the cycle symbol (once every 200 yards on some routes).

Post edited at 20:10
In reply to elsewhere:

> You can only point to the cycle symbol (once every 200 yards on some routes).

Indeed, but are we all so far up our own arses that we can't just deal with this without it ruining our day? Christ almighty how easy are our lives if we even notice this! (Not specifically directed at you BTW, just a despairing rant).

 

 elsewhere 16 Nov 2018
In reply to Stuart en Écosse:

Yes, we're all just going from a to b.

Some sections of my route have cycling direction signs at each end a couple of hundred yards apart. At one place unless you enter by just two of the six or eight entry points there's nothing to indicate mixed pedestrian/cycle path. Never a problem there though. 

Post edited at 20:57
 FinrodFelagund 19 Nov 2018
In reply to The Potato:

> I dont mean shared paths / lanes that have the blue bike / person symbol on them I just mean a path with a bike symbol on it.

> Are people allowed to walk on them?

Yes. They are. 

 the sheep 19 Nov 2018
In reply to FinrodFelagund:

Just as you are allowed to cycle on the pavement too should you wish.

In reply to the sheep:

> Just as you are allowed to cycle on the pavement too should you wish.


It's illegal to cycle on a pavement

 the sheep 19 Nov 2018
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

No, its illegal to cycle on a footpath, however most pavements are not footpaths

 Rampikino 19 Nov 2018
In reply to the sheep:

Section 64
Something that confuses many cyclists is whether or not they are allowed to cycle on the pavement. According to Laws HA 1835 section 72 & RSA 1984, section 129, cyclists must not cycle on the pavement.

 the sheep 19 Nov 2018
In reply to Rampikino:

The act refers to footpaths and causways which can be beside or separate from the road, whilst a technicality and one that would probably not wash with the old bill were you nabbed riding on the pavement thats the wording. 

The point that would need clarification would be is it a footpath as designated on an OS map, or is a footpath merely somewhere where folks walk?

 elsewhere 19 Nov 2018
In reply to Rampikino:

Except over the years at least one and I think more than one ministers have said pavement cycling is generally* OK

*ie not 20mph dodging pedestrians

https://road.cc/content/news/108119-transport-minister-responsible-cyclists-can-ride-pavement

That doesn't actually change the law though.

 

Post edited at 12:38
 Rampikino 19 Nov 2018
In reply to the sheep:

Not sure how clear you want it, but here's the view of a legal company...

Is there legislation for pavement cycling?

The simple answer to this is yes. Section 72 of the Highway Act 1835 prohibits ‘wilfully riding’ on footpaths, which refers to the path at the side of a carriageway. The original law from 1835 doesn’t refer to bicycles or cyclists (as bicycles weren’t in such common use in England as they are today) and it doesn’t mention pavements - as this is a modern word. However, the interpretation is clear - it’s not legal for a cyclist to ride their bike on the pavement. The Highway Code also states: “You must not cycle on a pavement.”

The offence of riding a bike on the pavement is punishable by an on-the-spot fine, a fixed penalty notice of £30. This is charged under Schedule 3 and Section 51 of the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988.

 

 Rampikino 19 Nov 2018
In reply to elsewhere:

No it's a fair point.  I'm dealing with the fact in law rather than whether or not it would be enforced!

 

 gravy 19 Nov 2018

The most difficult thing about cycling with pedestrians is a lack of predictability.  I use a bell from a long distance off but try not to use it close up as a last resort yelling works but isn't pleasant.

A typical scenario is the walker turns looking over one shoulder but turns around the axis of their head (understandable) and in order to do that they take steps around in a circle  crossing the path you can't tell if they will go CW or CCW so the person warned late really needs the space of 3 walkers to avoid them. 

Another is that, without any attempt to look or determine the direction of the warning bell they just step left or right.  This even occurs randomly if they are already at the edge of a path - they are just as likely to step into the middle as the side.

Groups are even worse - unless one person hears before the others and coordinates the group, people turn, step side ways, cross the path in seemingly random directions.

Phones and headphones significantly add to the problem and massively disrupt situation awareness (especially for riders when headphones seem like madness to me).

Dogs and dog walkers range from the sane and pleasant to the barking mad and dogs are as thick as shit and seemingly lack any sense of self preservation relying on their owners for instruction (which they frequently don't get). They should be a law against extendible leads with black cable!

Most of this is quite normal and quite understandable and there are a couple of generally useful principles that are useful in dealing with this:

(1) The faster or more mechanical you are the more you should take care not to injure others.

(2) Mixing peds and bikes is much kinder on everyone than mixing cars and bikes (or cars and peds).

(3) Be nice to your fellow person - try not to run them down, startle them of knock them off their bikes.

Warn early and take care - it's not too hard.

In reply to the sheep:

> No, its illegal to cycle on a footpath, however most pavements are not footpaths


Highway code rule 64

 

You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement.

 PaulJepson 19 Nov 2018

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