UKH

Bike lock

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 girlymonkey 24 Sep 2021

My mum has got worried about various reports of bike thefts in our area (I don't think her bike is at risk at all, it's not a bike that anyone would target! However, it's her pride and joy so I will humour her on it!).

She sent me a link to a £16 D-lock from Halfords and asked me if it's better than a standard cable style lock. My instinct is that it is maybe a bit better, but at that price probably not much better. Would that be a fair assumption? 

Do you choose a lock based on price or style? There are some interesting style ones coming up on a search which look easier to carry around and claim great things: https://www.ammpoure.com/collections/home-appliance/products/mountain-bike-lock-anti-theft-folding-hamburger-lock-bicycles-and-motorcycles-portable-folding-lock-riding-equipment-bicycle?gclid=CjwKCAjw7rWKBhAtEiwAJ3CWLKDf_ZabCfgBfwKp0EvnisalsaTPrVKukkX0uT8Gy6HzmrR3DWhjLhoClHwQAvD_BwE

Any thoughts on this style? Other ones worth considering? 

I don't think that her bike is greatly at risk, but if she is going to spend money on a better lock, I would rather it was actually better rather than wasting money on something that is no better or only marginally better.

 Mike Peacock 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

I live in a city of lots of bikes, and lots of bike theft, so I use a U-lock (for the frame) and a chain lock (to link the frame and front wheel). Both of which were expensive (the U-lock was about £50 I think). But if your mum's bike isn't likely to be attractive to thieves, all she has to do is make it harder to steal than the next bike along. So provided the Halfords lock isn't totally rubbish maybe that would be enough to deter thieves.

If you want to spend money, you can get brackets to fix a U lock to a bike frame so the bike does the lock carrying for you, eg:
https://www.abus.com/uk/Mobile-Security/Bike-Safety-and-Security/Holders-and-bags/EaZy-KF

 daWalt 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

go for style - always:

https://www.pylones.com/en/bike-accessories/1691-gift-style-bike-lock-ketzavelo.html#/11-colors-Green

these are not very secure, the cable is not particularly thick underneath the stylized webbing sheath. they're secure enough, medium to light weight in terms of bike-lock cable, you would need decent bolt-cutters to go through them....

Post edited at 13:24
 Jon Greengrass 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

I choose a lock based on Sold Secure rating or the value of the guarantee. The lock you linked to offers neither of these, so I wouldn't get one, whereas the £16 one from Halfords is Bronze Sold Secure rated with a £300 cover level.  How much would your mum's bike cost to replace new, considering that bicycles have never been in shorter supply or more expensive?

I would only go for a D-lock or a chain, depending on what I'm locking the bike to.  Combination locks are a total no go, I've seen kids sitting by bike racks going through all the combinations to steal a bike.

 TheGeneralist 24 Sep 2021

If you want a lock that  keeps the  Insurance company happy then look at the Sold Secure Cabal.  It's a load of shite, but the insurance will pay out.

If you want a lock that will deal with everything except angle grinders then buy Almax or Pragmasys.  I have approximately 11m of Pragmasis chain in conjunction with a tyre o' crete.  Not sure why I bothered with the tyreocrete tbh as the chains alone weigh around 40kg.

If I'm camping then I use a 6m chain to lock them to the van rear axle.

If I'm nipping into a shop then I use the mini 2 metre  pragmasis chain(only 11mm thick)

if you want to protect against angle grinders then....

You're plumb out of luck. 

Post edited at 13:32
 gethin_allen 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

If a thief really wants a bike then they will probably get it, it's simply impractical to use so many locks as to make a bike guaranteed safe.

Most cable locks are a waste of time and can be cut easily and quietly with small concealable tools.

D-locks are considerably better, even cheap ones. The better ones would need power tools and large heave bolt croppers to cut through.

Those linked bar style locks like the one you linked to are somewhere between the two but fall victim to nut splitter tools which are quiet and easily concealable.

D-locks are heavy and a bit of hassle to carry around but you can get smaller ones with moulded silicone coverings that are still safe and less awkward to carry but you want something that can lock a frame + wheel to a solid object at a minimum.

Post edited at 13:33
 gethin_allen 24 Sep 2021
In reply to TheGeneralist:

I think you're maybe overestimating the needs of a middle aged cyclist with a not particularly desirable bike.

Not many people, even those with expensive bikes, will carry 11 mm chains around with them. and if you have a flash enough bike thieves have been known to just cut through the frame in order go get at the components that alone are worth a lot and are easier to dispose of anyway.

 Hooo 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

In my (bitter) experience cable locks are a waste of time if you're leaving any bike out of sight for more than a few minutes. They can be cut in a second with a pocket sized hand tool and the sort of scum that carry these will steal absolutely anything if it's easy.

A £16 D-lock will be far superior and on a cheap bike will probably deter anyone from bothering.

 ChrisJD 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

Is the lock for when 'out-n-about' or back at base? Or both.

 spenser 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

Best to consider what attractive bits can be nicked without tools and then lock those to the bike.

Strip lights and pump off it if leaving for a while.

U lock and a cable through one or both wheels.

Use a seatpost clamp which requires an allen key to undo (assuming that your mum isn't taking it out mountain biking and therefore doesn't need to adjust seat height regularly).

Personally I use a combination chain lock, however my bike is only locked up in a few situations:

On a secure site (work) for several hours

Next to my tent on a campsite, or in the middle of nowhere, guyline often wrapped around it, overnight

Half an hour outside a shop.

 girlymonkey 24 Sep 2021
In reply to ChrisJD:

Just in town when shopping etc. She has a locked garage at home.

Thanks for the comments, sounds like best to go for something that looks the part and doesn't weigh an absolute tonne. (Although, given the weight of her bike, it might make little difference!)

In reply to girlymonkey:

Some D-locks can be picked with a bic biro in a matter of seconds. Lots of info on youtube.

youtube.com/watch?v=l5efaWSWwlk&

A D-lock  will still act as a deterrent to illiterate bike thieves. Of course, if they really want your bike, they will wait until you unlock the multiple locks and remove the battleship chain. Then they will pull a knife or smack you with a bit of 4x2. Or they will lock their crap bike to yours, with a strong lock. Then come back later when no one is about and simply cut the frame, rob the bike and sell the parts on ebay.

OP: Has your mum though about making her bike less desirable to thieves? Painting it bright pink and fluorescent green, perhaps.

 gravy 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

A d-lock is defo more effective than a cable (although if you lose the key and have to cut it go for the fat cross bar rather than the d - much easier).  Cables can be useful but not usually worth the extra weight in your bag.  A sold secure one (as pointed out above) helps with insurance claims but doesn't really contribute to effective security.

The argument goes that it's quick and quiet to snip things with bolt croppers so these are popular tools - d-locks don't really succumb to these easily and require an angle grinder (or elbow grease and a good hacksaw blade) so are more effective. 

Most solid folding locks are quite snipable so not much more cop than a cable or chain.

They're all heavy - I have two locks, one I leave at work and the other I leave at home and I consider this very good value compared with carrying the lock on my commute.

Apparently a plastic bag over the saddle is an effective deterrent but I don't know why!

 LastBoyScout 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

For out and about, I've got one of these - D-lock for the frame and the cable through the wheels - can be found a lot less than the £70 here. I got mine for about £38ish in their sale:

https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bike-accessories/bike-locks/evolution-mini-7-lock-with-4-foot-cable-with-flexframe-bracket-sold-secure-silver-581667.html

However, D-locks are a pain, as they don't fit around some lamp posts, so I'm mainly using a HipLok Lite for short term locking around town on the pub bike - and that bike has anti-theft wheel nuts.

My next lock will probably be this one, as bit more versatile than a D-lock for getting round lamp posts - also shop around for best price:

https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bike-accessories/bike-locks/evolution-1090-integrated-chain---10-mm-x-90-cm-sold-secure-gold-126072.html-126072.html.

At home, I use Oxford motorbike chains attached to wall brackets, but that might be overkill for your needs.

 gethin_allen 24 Sep 2021
In reply to LastBoyScout:

"> My next lock will probably be this one, as bit more versatile than a D-lock for getting round lamp posts - also shop around for best price:

Sadly, that chain is 2.7 kg, a full 1.1 kg more than the kryptonite evolution mini7. Not really a good lock to carry around.

 NorthernGrit 24 Sep 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

Decent Dlock if only using one. Standard advice is use two different types of lock if possible as thieves are often equipped only with tools for dealing with one type of lock and will scout around for the right type.

 LastBoyScout 24 Sep 2021
In reply to gethin_allen:

> Sadly, that chain is 2.7 kg, a full 1.1 kg more than the kryptonite evolution mini7. Not really a good lock to carry around.

Doh - posted in haste and didn't notice that's the 90cm one! There is a shorter 55cm version, which is the one I meant:

https://www.kryptonitelock.com/en/products/product-information/current-key/000792.html

Still 2Kg, but then I like my bikes and don't want some scrote to have an easy target when I'm out

In reply to gravy:

Rather than a D-lock get a Glock. Much easier to carry and a great deterrent to bike thieves.

 Rampart 24 Sep 2021
In reply to Ridge:

>  a great deterrent to bike thieves.

Only if you camp next to the bike the whole time, which would negate the point

In reply to girlymonkey:

I have various locks depending on where I’m going to leave a bike. I generally think D locks are very good but sometimes not practical for carrying or getting around some railings, etc, so I also have one of these wearable chains - https://hiplok.com/product/hiplok-original/ . Not cheap, but easy to wear and use. Also, importantly in theory on paper, it satisfies my insurance requirement for a lock.

If the bike is not to be left for too long, anything that looks sturdy is a useful deterrent for a casual type of theft. If someone targets the bike though then there is not much that will stop a professional that can be carried in practice.

In reply to LastBoyScout:

> For out and about, I've got one of these - D-lock for the frame and the cable through the wheels - can be found a lot less than the £70 here. I got mine for about £38ish in their sale:

I use the cable part of that set up with a good quality closed shackle padlock on my motorbike when out touring. It seems like a very good bit of kit, the bike has never been stolen and there has never been evidence of tampering. 

Question is has it put people off trying or have I just been lucky. 


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