/ Another youngest munroist

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fmck - on 24 Feb 2013
The latest youngest munroist aged 9. This record seems to be more and more pushed for in the past year we had the 10 year old from Cumbria then the twins and now a 9 year old!

As fantastic achievement this is and all the best for the wee guy but:: Does make you think of a number of questions regarding the parents.
fmck - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:

The lad from Glasgow. D.Smith completed yesterday 23/02/13
IainRUK - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck: I think I know who the cumbrian was.. his old man posts on here..

Of course its always worth bearing in mind, but I don't think the motivations were anything other than genuine. Its hardly a money spinner.. great to see families out on the hill together..
prog99 on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
We met him and his dad last year. They'd done the fisherfield 6 and were off to an Teallach the next day.
He actually does most of the planning and there was no indication that dad was dragging him round the hills.
Orgsm on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:

If both his parents visit Scotland a lot, then it'd be pretty easy for him to complete the munros by that age, particularly if they are trying to complete them also. I first walked up Snowdonia, aged 4, and was walking on Kinder etc. with just my mates by 9. So definitely not too young at all
fmck - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to IainRUK:

No one would question this being a money driven venture. Hill bagging and with Internet forums probably a drive for notoriety these days maybe.

I just think does a lad that age need that when his bones are still forming. At what point did this lad decide himself " I want to complete the Munros as fast as possible"

The questions could go on and on.
IainRUK - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck: If the previous one was who I think it was he did the welsh 3000ers age 6... Aye possibly, but I'd say its a much healthier lifestyle than 6 hrs a day watching TV and playing the X-box..
fmck - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to Beat me to it!:

Your parents let you do that when you were in primary 4!

Doesn't read good.

I ran away for a weekend during the winter on Arran when I was 12. Got seriously learned over that one.
fmck - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to IainRUK:

My kids wouldn't know what that is but they spend time out on the hills enjoying themselves.

Program, dead lines, tick boxes me think not.
Orgsm on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to Beat me to it!)
>
> Your parents let you do that when you were in primary 4!
>
> Doesn't read good.
>

Nonsense , we were already orienteering by that age, nav well honed, and for the terrain our judgement was fine at that age. Some people much older still don't have hill sense, no matter how much they do it.

fmck - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to Beat me to it!:

Do you send your primary 4 year old kids off into the hills alone with a : " on you go it will do you good"

fmck - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:

Just seen the STV interview. Poor wee guy answers. The question what do you like about Munros : " I get to spend time with my dad"

Dear oh!
Orgsm on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to Beat me to it!)
>
> Do you send your primary 4 year old kids off into the hills alone with a : " on you go it will do you good"

Gods sake, we weren't sent out the door, with a don't come back till 5 attitude. We went, because we found it fun, and wanted to. No pressure from parents what so ever.
fmck - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to Beat me to it!:

That was avoiding the question me thinks or do you not have kids.
aln - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck: Could you explain exactly what your objections are?
Orgsm on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:

Oh you're asking about my kids, I thought you meant my parents.

In answer, yes I let my kids head out with their friends when they were that age. But they weren't pushed out the door with a "It'll do you good" as your post stated. As it is, they don't have the same enthusiasm for the hills as their parents, which is fine. But they do go out alone, doing the things they do enjoy.

I'm a great believer in letting kids explore the things they develop an enthusiasm for, and a bit of gentle encouragement, together with a bit of independence as they get older, goes a long way.
Murvis on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to IainRUK)
>
> I just think does a lad that age need that when his bones are still forming. At what point did this lad decide himself " I want to complete the Munros as fast as possible"
>
> The questions could go on and on.

I did most of the Munros I've done by that age - started age 3/4, did the more local ones several times etc, rather than trying to bag them all (though I wanted to!) - and I don't think it's a bad thing health wise. If anything it just makes walking/running up hill feel easy now because the body developed doing it, even after years out.
Roberttaylor - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck: I met that kid and his dad in the Ben Nevis car park last summer. Both friendly, interesting folk and into climbing as well. They mentioned the probable 'youngest completion' thing and I've been looking out for this article since then. Nice to see it.
fmck - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to aln:

Records are there to be beat so they say and I'm all for that but the youngest one I always find a bit in bad taste.
Getting kids younger and younger to go chasing records just doesn't seem right. Had the kid failed to achieve what would be the result?
To chase after a round in such a short time it obviously wasn't always good weather when they were out.
Had they become separated in bad weather would he be capable of getting out alone safely?
Again if his father fell would a 9 year old be emotionally capable of getting himself out. Long shot but hillwalking accidents do happen as we have seen this winter.
Don't get me wrong I'm all for kids out on the hill just needs a bit off common sense and ease off the frantic driven need for a completion of this type.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Steve Perry - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to aln)
>
> Had they become separated in bad weather would he be capable of getting out alone safely?
> Again if his father fell would a 9 year old be emotionally capable of getting himself out. Long shot but hillwalking accidents do happen as we have seen this winter.

I think your panicking a bit much here. A 9yr old is pretty resilient - which the lad has shown - I reckon he'd do just fine. I'm pretty sure he's old fella hasn't just took him up all the Munros without passing on some hill skills to him and after being up 282 of them, my money is on him getting back to their start point on his own if need be. Good on him.

fmck - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Steve Perry:

You would encourage parents to possibly get their 8,7,6 year olds to complete in order to be the youngest?
Kevin Woods - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Steve Perry: Well said. It gets me when the oldies come out about how outrageous it all is. What a shame. Moan the boy.
aln - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck: I'll second what the other poster said about the child's potential ability to get out of a dodgy situation. I don't know the kids level of ability, do you? As for your comment about the kids reaction to seeing his dad have an accident. Driving is dangerous, kids survive accidents which their parents don't. Should we stop family car journeys? Most accidents happen at home, make children live apart from their parents in case one of them falls down the stairs? And lastly why are you so sure the father was chasing a record, has he said that?
Neil Pratt - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:

I used to love getting out on the hill with my dad when I was little - it triggered a lifelong love of the outdoors in me, and I think I would have been ecstatic if we'd gone out more often, done bigger days, wild camped more and so on. In my case, my mum was pretty risk averse, so certain trips my dad did were declared 'off limits' to me.

As long as the wee guy is lapping it up, and there's an underlying concern for his physical and psychological welfare, then I don't see any reason why he and his dad shouldn't crack on.
jfmchivall - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to aln)
>
> To chase after a round in such a short time it obviously wasn't always good weather when they were out.

9 years isn't a particularly short time for a round.
wercat on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:

I suppose it comes down to whether you can evaluate kudos for a young achievement undertaken with the supervision of elders as against the fun of doing it under your own steam making the discoveries for yourself as an adult? 2 different sides of the coin.
Orgsm on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:

You are Health and Safety gone mad and I claim my £5


Did your parents not allow you out till you were 18, and did they send you out with an airbag?
colina - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck: cant see a problem with this .to be fair no 9 year old could possibly do such a feat unless he wanted too .good on the lad ,a great achievement .next step .youngest Everest climber maybe.
Jim C - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to jfmchivall:
> (In reply to fmck)
> [...]
>
> 9 years isn't a particularly short time for a round.

It is if part of it you have to learn to walk!
(usually about 9-15 months) lets say a year, so he did them in less than 8 years,
However, my guess he would be about 3/4 when he did his first, so if that is correct, then he did them all in 5 /6years.
malky_c - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck: I'm not sure about the whole record thing, but you don't end up achieving this without the kid being interested and enjoying it, so good for them. Having followed the progress of the twins from Argyll, it never looks like they aren't enjoying themselves. I'm all for kids getting out in the hills young - it's how I developed my interest in the outdoors.

Anyway, what is it with you these days? You used to post up really inspirational photo blogs that were enjoyable to read, but now you only come online to moan or troll.
fmck - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to Jim C:

He took him round in 3 years that sounds like a fairly intense round.

Just what is classed as a bag as one of my sons did his first Munro at 7 months. Albeit I think I would rather he spent 3 years with kids his age rather than adult baggers. It's a sure way to join the express highway to goofy town at school I would imagine.

Nope no way they can enjoy them at leisure.

fmck - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to malky_c:

Jeez what is it with you is it a one man crusade to make me a back slapping love forum Shiller ( I think that's what u guys call yourselves)

This is the third time you have come preaching and third Internet site.

Suppose it s a bit flattering to have a stalker : )
Nigel Thomson - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
>

>
>
Does make you think of a number of questions regarding the parents.

Any questions I have could be easily answered as I've had the privilege of sharing an office with the lads mother. A woman, who in my opinion is currently doing a sterling job of raising her children.
Dad appears to be not a bad guy too!

Tripe_Reporter - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to malky_c)
>
> Jeez what is it with you is it a one man crusade to make me a back slapping love forum Shiller ( I think that's what u guys call yourselves)

:)LOL

http://www.scottishhills.com/html/modules.php?name=Trip_Report_Authors&author_id=242
malky_c - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to Tripe_Reporter:

See? All quality stuff - much better than this whinge of a thread. No back slapping required.
fmck - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:

My input in this thread had to be suspended due to the " spooky B#####d " following me!
Tripe_Reporter - on 26 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to fmck)
>
> My input in this thread had to be suspended due to the " spooky B#####d " following me!

your former back-slapping love-in existence as a SHiller? You can't escape your past you know. ;)
Full moon addict - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck: as father of ben, the previous youngest munroist, I can say that you can't drag a child up all the munros. Its would just be a horrible experience all round. actually having a tick list is really good for children. Its a motivation as it is for many adults. since then, we've done less, but have visited the outer hebrides, norway and local hills. Its difficult for anyone to judge on here without actually meeting the people concerned.

Its a recognised fact that sons are close to their fathers from 6-12 years old - an ideal time to go hillwalking. after that they want to be with their mates. For me it was a special time and doing something like that is a real bonding experience.
fmck - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Full moon addict:

Gutted for you mate!

You have been an inspiration to me likewise the new youngest king. I already have lowered my 2 year old out the up stair velux window in preperation for the inn pinn.

As a wee tip for any other aspiring father is a little bit of grease on their wee hands helps with any initial fears!
ads.ukclimbing.com
kinley2 - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to fmck:
You still getting access Fraser? Amazing. :)

Nice wee quiet eddy you've found to play troll in - suits you.:))
fmck - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to kinley2:

Suppose its the same as yourself after your ban from walk highlands.

Kinley2/ tripe reporter or whatever other ones you use here its a light hearted discussion we both know with your history your the real one trolling.

Did I come to your table and start making a pest ?
kinley2 - on 01 Mar 2013
In reply to fmck: as a matter of fact...yes.

Anyhoo - carry on old man. Apologies if your flow was interrupted. ;)

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