/ building a touring set

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
ford23 - on 20 Oct 2012
Im planning to try build up a touring set for this winter,
starting with bindings then skis, then boots later on
Does anyone have any good value second hand bindings such as the marker duke or baron, which fit alpine skiing quite well ( and possibly some touring skis)? if I can get enough money before winter I was thinking of maybe buying a set off sport conrad, can anyone give any opinions on either the bindings marker duke 16 ,or the skis k2 backlite, or offer any suggestions ? thanks
Dave Kerr - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to sethmford:
> can anyone give any opinions on either the bindings marker duke 16 ,or the skis k2 backlite, or offer any suggestions ? thanks

Dukes and Backlites would be an odd combo. A light, narrow ski paired with a set of beasting, cliff hucking bindings. Unless you are about 16 stone and properly tear it up Dukes will be excessive.

To get recommendations I suggest you post a bit more about what kind of skiing you like or want to do. For example, do you want a do everything (inc piste) set-up or do you want a pure touring set-up? What do you wnat the ski to be best at and where are you willing to compromise? The standard you ski at would be helpful too.
ford23 - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr: yes, thanks for the advice, to clear that up, i plan to use them for an mix of pieste and touring, i very much enjoy off pieste desents so probably looking for a heavier binding, and as im not genrally looking at long long tours i wouldn't mind a slightly heavier ski, as for standard im not really sure, ive done piste for maybe two seasons and spent this winter lugging my very heavy skis up mountains in the pyranesse to ski down them, id guess harder than black runs. id just really like to get into a situation this winter where I can skin up what ive previously had to lug skis up and enjoy the mountains
Aly - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to sethmford: To echo what Dave has said, I think you need to tell us a bit more about what kind of skiing/touring you're hoping to do on them. The Duke's are definitely a strange choice for the Backlite and would probably work better on either the Coomback or the Sidestash. Also, do you really need the extra DIN that the Baron's don't offer - how heavy are you?

Also, whilst it's tempting to buy bits and pieces at a time, is it really worth buying bindings if you have no skis to ski them on? it might make more sense to buy a pair of boots that fit well, and then hire a touring setup until you have the cash to buy the skis and bindings together, otherwise you're paying this years prices to own a pair of bindings you can't use until next year when you buy the skis.
ford23 - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to Aly: sorry the reason i was looking at the dukes was just from reading on the website, i cant claim to know much about ski touring kit. i weigh 80 kiloes, it terms of what id like to get from touring, id hope to be doing 1 day tours from where i live ( central high pryaneese) so probably largley very steep assents and descents although if i ever got the chance id love to go to somewhere like norway where there is more veriety of landscape.
i owe a nice set of downhill boots ( comfortable enoguh to walk in as ive bitten the bullet and climed in them a couple times) and a second hand pair of downhill ski's which i should be able to attach bindings onto should i get hold of some. i've looked into renting near where i live its just exteremly expensive ( i think work out more than a pair of bindings for the holiday), especially as ive got 5 weeks off at chritsmas and with the weather being virable so i'd need them for the hole time, then the same at Easter. Again I know hiring would be better in many ways i think its just not economicaly available.
Aly - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to sethmford: Sorry, I think you posted whilst I was typing a reply!
Well, if you're after a more downhill orientated setup that will be skiied on piste a fair bit then a Marker-like binding isn't a bad idea. Unless you're a very aggressive skier or pretty heavy then the Baron's are a cheaper binding but otherwise identical to the Duke's (4-13 rather than 6-16). It might also be worth considering the Freeride Pro's (the newer ones look much stiffer than the old versions) or the new Salomon binding (if it's available yet?) if you can find any of them cheap.

For a downhill setup in the Alps or Pyrenees I'd have thought that you would want about 100mm at the waist for an all-mountain ski. In the K2 range you have the Coomback or the Hardside, and maybe the Sidestash if you want to go a bit wider. You might also want to have a look at things like the Volkl Mantras or any number of skis in that kind of size (second hand DPS, Black Diamond, Black Crows, Atomics etc. etc. etc.)

Unless you can find second hand you'll also have to shell out over 100 for skins, and although it's a bit of an initial outlay, I think it's worth buying the whole lot together so you have a use-able setup.
Aly - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to Aly: It might also be worth considering a pair of Alpine Trekkers if your skinning is likely to be fairly shortlived and only really to access steeps. The plus side there is you could recycle your downhill binings and continue to use your DH boots (if you won't be doing a huge amount of skinning or walking out in them).
ford23 - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to Aly: yea, i thoguht they looked like a good option, however people seemed to disagree. also they seem hard to find second hand though, not very common. But as a temporary thing they could be really useful, although again not very usefull the more i got into it..
Dave Kerr - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to sethmford:

One option for you if you could afford it is to get a ski that will give good downhill performance in a variety of conditions and save some weight by pairing it with a Dynafit binding.

If weight is not an issue then marker barons are probably the way to go for price and security on shorter tours / approaches. Fritschi Freerides probably tour better but are a bit more expensive.
Dave Kerr - on 20 Oct 2012
In reply to sethmford:

Conrad has some amazing package deals
OwenM - on 21 Oct 2012
In reply to sethmford:
> also they seem hard to find second hand though, not very common.

I've a pair, if your interested PM me.
ford23 - on 22 Oct 2012
In reply to OwenM: message sent ( i think to your email)
cyberpunk - on 23 Oct 2012
In reply to sethmford: Hey I am in the same boat here in Austria for this winter, so I cannt answer your question but here are 2 very good videos on ski touring repair kit that I will be carrying with me when touring this winter.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reHCAPTYGz4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvyExS2CwEs
Swanage luvver - on 13 Nov 2012
In reply to sethmford: Hi, I have an old touring set if you're interested and dont want to spend too much initially. It consists of a pair of 180cm Atomic Beta Ride 922s fitted with Fritschi Diamir Titanal bindings & brakes plus fitted skins. All for say 80. Pics available.
edinburgh_man on 13 Nov 2012
In reply to Swanage luvver:

Could you send me a photo please - prob take these if they are still available. (Need a spare set).

ross dot mathers at google mail dot com
Morgan Woods - on 13 Nov 2012
In reply to sethmford:

i've skinned up for a few hours my 123mm waist skis and marker barons....not the lightest but ok for half a day or so. As said above not sure why you would match markers to Backlites. Dynafits would make more sense....in fact i might even take the markers off and put some dynafits onto my big skis to trim the weight a bit.
crewman waden - on 13 Nov 2012
In reply to sethmford:
Have a look at the mfd alltime site, getting a set for my S7s and can re use my tyrolia alpine bindings.

http://runmfd.com/

enjoy the touring

Morgan Woods - on 13 Nov 2012
In reply to crewman waden:

cheers for that....they look pretty solid.
Mike_Gannon - on 13 Nov 2012
In reply to sethmford: I went with frischi bindings. I found they sit above the ski so some people think they reduce the performance. But they are more robust when you ski crud broken snow, are less likely to pop, and are less problematic when the snow is sticking to your boots.
Fultonius - on 13 Nov 2012
In reply to Mike_Gannon: Are you really suggesting a fritschi is more robust than a baron??

ads.ukclimbing.com
sdjhayes - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Fultonius: Having skied both - they are both great... the Fritschi is the better tourer, the Baron the better Freeride... it's always a compromise !!!
Have the best of both worlds - get Quiver Killer Inserts, mount both and choose depending on what you are doing...
It's not a joke - as a ski tech, I set up my boards to accept more than one binding, and do the best for the day. I have 3 sets of bindings (Fritschis, Duke & Alpine Downhill) and a good few sets of boards, and am not locked into a single setup :-)
Have a look at my site:
http://www.ski-drop.co.uk/bindings--quiver-killer.html
This IS worth considering if you are into your skiing
sdjhayes - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to crewman waden:
By the way - I wouldn't touch these with a bargepole... a rubbish solution unless you're doing very limited side country...
moffatross on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to sdjhayes:

Yes, Quiver Killers are pretty good, I share Dynafits & Barons between my planks ...

http://i44.tinypic.com/33biutd.jpg
fairweatherclimber - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Swanage luvver: I might be interested in these if you still have them?
Cheers
kevin stephens - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to sethmford:
My advice would be to get a complete set up skis, bindings, boots, skins, transceiver! probe and shovel from new. it will cost a fair bit but go to a good shop and you should get some discount and most importantly expert advice to get the right gear for YOU that will last a lifetime. For me Scott Missions, Fritshi Eagle bindings and Scarpa Denali boots ticked all the boxes (Ok I've got a pair of BD Factors too). Your ideal kit may be totaly different.

But a mail order lucky dip based on some advice from UKC is likely to end up as an expensive mistake. Skiing is a big commitment not just in terms of gear cost but time and money to master the skills - but ever so worth it.

Good luck and enjoy
In reply to sethmford: I recently bought a full set up from Sport Conrad. Buying in dribs and drabs is expensive. Also, Sport conrad sell bindings on skis that have been used onvefor demo purposes at a big discount. Shop around.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.